Must Read on Pocket

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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Tushar Kirtane

Shared April 26, 2016

It’s a paradox: Shouldn’t the most accomplished be well equipped to make choices that maximize life satisfaction?

Joe McCann

Shared May 18, 2016

Fascinating article on happiness

Valentin Muro

Shared May 19, 2018

Being better educated, richer, or more accomplished doesn’t do much to predict whether someone will be happy. In fact, it might mean someone is less likely to be satisfied with life.

Rakesh Gupta

Shared April 26, 2016

Being better educated, richer, or more accomplished doesn’t do much to predict whether someone will be happy. In fact, it might mean someone is less likely to be satisfied with life.

Oscar Bazaldúa

Shared April 28, 2016

One extreme is a kind of scarcity-minded approach, that my win is going to come at somebody else's loss, which makes you engage in social comparisons. And the other view is what I would call a more abundance-oriented approach, that there's room for everybody to grow.

Joe Christy

Shared May 1, 2016

Why should there be a correlation between smarts and happiness anyway?

Petr Zvonicek

Shared July 3, 2016

The one thing that has really really helped me in this regard is a concept that I call “the dispassionate pursuit of passion” in the book, and basically the concept boils down to not tethering your happiness to the achievement of outcomes.

What I recommend is an alternative approach, which is to become a little more aware of what it is that you're really good at, and what you enjoy doing. When you don't need to compare yourself to other people, you gravitate towards things that you instinctively enjoy doing, and you're good at, and if you just focus on that for a long enough time, then chances are very, very high that you're going to progress towards mastery anyway, and the fame and the power and the money and everything will come as a byproduct, rather than something that you chase directly in trying to be superior to other people.

Szymon Kaliski

Shared April 27, 2016

Why So Many Smart People Aren’t Happy

Sandeep C Kannikanti

Shared April 28, 2016

Abundance mindset.

Adam B

Shared March 12, 2019

“Oh my goodness, this is the end of the world! I'm never going to recover from it.” But it turns out we're very good at recovering from those, and not just that, but those very events that we thought were really extremely negative were in fact pivotal in making us grow and learn.

Aduke Thelwell

Shared April 30, 2016

A compelling summary of why it is crucial to eliminate external comparison from your life, the only competition is to be better than you were yesterday.

Silvia Minu Patriche

Shared April 30, 2016

you actually perform better if you don't put yourself under the scarcity mindset, if you don’t worry about the outcomes and enjoy the process of doing something, rather than the goal

Abhishek Biswal

Shared May 3, 2016

It’s a paradox: Shouldn’t the most accomplished be well equipped to make choices that maximize life satisfaction?

Edward Wexler-Beron

Shared May 19, 2018

What I recommend is an alternative approach, which is to become a little more aware of what it is that you're really good at, and what you enjoy doing. When you don't need to compare yourself to other people, you gravitate towards things that you instinctively enjoy doing, and you're good at, and if you just focus on that for a long enough time, then chances are very, very high that you're going to progress towards mastery anyway, and the fame and the power and the money and everything will come as a byproduct, rather than something that you chase directly in trying to be superior to other people.

If you were to go back to the three things that people need—mastery, belonging, and autonomy—I'd add a fourth, after basic necessities have been met. It’s the attitude or the worldview that you bring to life. And that worldview can be characterized, just for simplicity, in one of two fashions: One extreme is a kind of scarcity-minded approach, that my win is going to come at somebody else's loss, which makes you engage in social comparisons. And the other view is what I would call a more abundance-oriented approach, that there's room for everybody to grow.

Lukasz Dolata

Shared April 26, 2016

Mądry nie znaczy szczęśliwy...

Jinyoung Chang

Shared December 28, 2017

What I recommend is an alternative approach, which is to become a little more aware of what it is that you're really good at, and what you enjoy doing. When you don't need to compare yourself to other people, you gravitate towards things that you instinctively enjoy doing, and you're good at, and if you just focus on that for a long enough time, then chances are very, very high that you're going to progress towards mastery anyway, and the fame and the power and the money and everything will come as a byproduct, rather than something that you chase directly in trying to be superior to other people.

If you were to go back to the three things that people need—mastery, belonging, and autonomy—I'd add a fourth, after basic necessities have been met. It’s the attitude or the worldview that you bring to life. And that worldview can be characterized, just for simplicity, in one of two fashions: One extreme is a kind of scarcity-minded approach, that my win is going to come at somebody else's loss, which makes you engage in social comparisons. And the other view is what I would call a more abundance-oriented approach, that there's room for everybody to grow.

Karen

Shared May 16, 2018

me @ RC life

the ingredients for happiness: having meaningful social relationships, being good at whatever it is one spends one’s days doing, and having the freedom to make life decisions independently

Alan Cohen

Shared May 1, 2016

The one thing that has really really helped me in this regard is a concept that I call “the dispassionate pursuit of passion” in the book, and basically the concept boils down to not tethering your happiness to the achievement of outcomes.

Paco Lima

Shared January 9, 2017

I think that as intelligent beings we need to recognize that some of the vestiges of our evolutionary tendencies might be holding us back

Evan Turner

Shared January 12, 2017

a great piece on the abundance mindset and why tying your happiness to specific outcomes may leave you underwhelmed in the end. Traveling has undoubtedly aided in my adoption of this practice

Pablo Massa

Shared April 27, 2016

El título no menciona que el foco del artículo es totally business minded. Interesante.

Nicholas Foong

Shared May 19, 2018

"If you were to go back to the three things that people need—mastery, belonging, and autonomy—I'd add a fourth, after basic necessities have been met. It’s the attitude or the worldview that you bring to life. And that worldview can be characterized, just for simplicity, in one of two fashions: One extreme is a kind of scarcity-minded approach, that my win is going to come at somebody else's loss, which makes you engage in social comparisons. And the other view is what I would call a more abundance-oriented approach, that there's room for everybody to grow."

Aldrich Co

Shared May 1, 2016

I guess I understand better now, why I'm not so happy. Shoutout to @neyamisoka

Marc Soska

Shared November 16, 2018

Ultimately, you can't force people to adopt an abundance mindset. They're going to have to select it themselves, through self-exploration and soul-searching, and looking at the science.

Ultimately, you can't force people to adopt an abundance mindset. They're going to have to select it themselves, through self-exploration and soul-searching, and looking at the science

Grace

Shared November 28, 2016

to become a little more aware of what it is that you're really good at, and what you enjoy doing. When you don't need to compare yourself to other people, you gravitate towards things that you instinctively enjoy doing, and you're good at

Victoria Fener

Shared April 30, 2016

Given that all of these beliefs are all equally valid, why not adopt the belief that is going to be more useful to you in your life as you go along?

Munirah Md Nazar

Shared March 2, 2018

Very interesting points here. Focus on what you're doing now instead of the outcomes. Achievements aren't the measurement of your happiness and success.

Duncan Beard

Shared April 26, 2016

As an extremely competitive person just entering the workforce, this definitely resonates with me. It's so difficult at times to avoid drawing comparisons between yourself and others, when it's almost encouraged at college.