Must Read on Pocket

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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Vujo Ilic

Shared May 10, 2018

"This interconnection of bugs and brain seems credible, too, from an evolutionary perspective. After all, bacteria have lived inside humans for millions of years. Cryan suggests that over time, at least a few microbes have developed ways to shape their hosts’ behavior for their own ends. Modifying mood is a plausible microbial survival strategy, he argues that “happy people tend to be more social. And the more social we are, the more chances the microbes have to exchange and spread.”

Maria G. Picatoste

Shared April 23, 2017

Research results in this field are extremely relevant. Can't wait to learn more about current and future findings.

Shannon Low

Shared May 12, 2018

Heehee. Our microbial overlords.

This interconnection of bugs and brain seems credible, too, from an evolutionary perspective. After all, bacteria have lived inside humans for millions of years. Cryan suggests that over time, at least a few microbes have developed ways to shape their hosts’ behavior for their own ends. Modifying mood is a plausible microbial survival strategy, he argues that “happy people tend to be more social. And the more social we are, the more chances the microbes have to exchange and spread.”

Scheer Jacobs

Shared November 16, 2016

Very interesting