Must Read on Pocket

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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Wesley Verhoeve

Shared August 10, 2017

I really should do something about this.

Lionel Dricot

Shared August 29, 2018

Smartphones are stealing your attention. Even when they are off!

Abby Nardo

Shared August 9, 2017

Yep.

Alexandre Villares

Shared August 4, 2017

Most office workers now know that “multi-tasking” is a fallacy. The brain isn’t doing two tasks at once as much as it’s making constant, costly switches between tasks. But Ward says that assiduously not multi-tasking isn’t very helpful, either.

Rakesh Gupta

Shared August 24, 2017

A silent, powered-off phone can still distract the most dependent users.

Amirreza H.A.

Shared August 20, 2017

A smartphone can tax its user’s cognition simply by sitting next to them on a table, or being anywhere in the same room with them, suggests a study published recently in the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research. It finds that a smartphone can demand its user’s attention even when the person isn’t using it or consciously thinking about it. Even if a phone’s out of sight in a bag, even if it’s set to silent, even if it’s powered off, its mere presence will reduce someone’s working memory and problem-solving skills.

Frank Holleman

Shared September 10, 2017

It finds that a smartphone can demand its user’s attention even when the person isn’t using it or consciously thinking about it. Even if a phone’s out of sight in a bag, even if it’s set to silent, even if it’s powered off, its mere presence will reduce someone’s working memory and problem-solving skills.

It finds that a smartphone can demand its user’s attention even when the person isn’t using it or consciously thinking about it. Even if a phone’s out of sight in a bag, even if it’s set to silent, even if it’s powered off, its mere presence will reduce someone’s working memory and problem-solving skills.

G H

Shared September 6, 2017

If you grow dependent on your smartphone, it becomes a magical device that magically, imperceptibly shouts your name at your brain at all times.

Benjamin Nash

Shared August 8, 2017

The last couple paragraphs are as interesting as the main article.

Robert Sfichi

Shared August 31, 2017

Attractive objects draw attention, and it takes mental energy to keep your attention focused when a desirable distractor is nearby,” Oppenheimer told me in an email. “Put a chocolate cake on the table next to a dieter, a pack of cigarettes on the table next to a smoker, or a supermodel in a room with pretty much anybody, and we would expect them to have a bit more trouble on whatever they’re supposed to be doing.”

Dan Keller

Shared September 30, 2018

FYI

Joshua Mathew

Shared November 28, 2018

One possible consequence of Ward’s work extends beyond smartphones. Most office workers now know that “multi-tasking” is a fallacy. The brain isn’t doing two tasks at once as much as it’s making constant, costly switches between tasks. But Ward says that assiduously not multi-tasking isn’t very helpful, either.

“When you’re succeeding at not multitasking—that is, when you’re doing a ‘good job’—that’s not exactly positive as well,” he said. That’s because it takes mental work, and uses up attentional resources, to avoid distraction.

Instead, he recommends that the most dependent users just put their smartphone in another room.

Sandeep Kumar

Shared August 9, 2017

umm scary isn't it?

Rita Heine

Shared August 9, 2017

Scary, and true

RJ Kayser

Shared August 12, 2017

a smartphone can demand its user’s attention even when the person isn’t using it or consciously thinking about it. Even if a phone’s out of sight in a bag, even if it’s set to silent, even if it’s powered off, its mere presence will reduce someone’s working memory and problem-solving skills.