Must Read on Pocket

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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Lauren Holliday

Shared November 20, 2018

There is no greater joy that I have in my life than having an idea that’s a good idea. At that moment it pops into my head, it is so deeply satisfying and rewarding … My nucleus accumbens is probably going nuts when it happens

Shekhar Ruparelia

Shared May 28, 2017

This is an amazing article. Please read. #longreads

Rakesh Gupta

Shared September 23, 2017

A leading neuroscientist who has spent decades studying creativity shares her research on where genius comes from, whether it is dependent on high IQ—and why it is so often accompanied by mental illness.

Lauren M Ford

Shared December 21, 2015

Brings up some interesting questions about creativity and its link to mental illness.

Courtney Zhu

Shared December 19, 2016

Intriguing connection between mental illness and creative genius

Steven Zulim

Shared January 3, 2018

Many creative people are autodidacts. They like to teach themselves, rather than be spoon-fed information or knowledge in standard educational settings.

Steven Zulim

Shared January 3, 2018

Many creative people are polymaths, as historic geniuses including Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci were.

Steven Zulim

Shared January 3, 2018

Some people see things others cannot, and they are right, and we call them creative geniuses. Some people see things others cannot, and they are wrong, and we call them mentally ill. And some people, like John Nash, are both.

Steven Zulim

Shared January 3, 2018

In my own version of a eureka moment, the answer finally came to me: creative people are better at recognizing relationships, making associations and connections, and seeing things in an original way—seeing things that others cannot see.

Jeremy W

Shared January 2, 2016

Learn. Explore. Synthesize.

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

The funny thing about [one’s own] talent is that you are blind to it. You just can’t see what it is when you have it … When you have talent and see things in a particular way, you are amazed that other people can’t see it.” Persisting in the face of doubt or rejection, for artists or for scientists, can be a lonely path—one that may also partially explain why some of these people experience mental illness.

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

One interesting paradox that has emerged during conversations with subjects about their creative processes is that, though many of them suffer from mood and anxiety disorders, they associate their gifts with strong feelings of joy and excitement. “Doing good science is simply the most pleasurable thing anyone can do,” one scientist told me. “It is like having good sex. It excites you all over and makes you feel as if you are all-powerful and complete.” This is reminiscent of what creative geniuses throughout history have said

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

It would be vain to try to put into words that immeasurable sense of bliss which comes over me directly a new idea awakens in me and begins to assume a different form. I forget everything and behave like a madman. Everything within me starts pulsing and quivering; hardly have I begun the sketch ere one thought follows another.

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

The nucleus accumbens, at the core of the brain’s reward system, is activated by pleasure, whether it comes from eating good food or receiving money or taking euphoria-inducing drugs.)

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

As for how these ideas emerge, almost all of my subjects confirmed that when eureka moments occur, they tend to be precipitated by long periods of preparation and incubation, and to strike when the mind is relaxed—during that state we called REST. “A lot of it happens when you are doing one thing and you’re not thinking about what your mind is doing,” one of the artists in my study told me. “I’m either watching television, I’m reading a book, and I make a connection … It may have nothing to do with what I am doing, but somehow or other you see something or hear something or do something, and it pops that connection together.”

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

🙏🙏🙏

Many creative people are autodidacts. They like to teach themselves, rather than be spoon-fed information or knowledge in standard educational settings. Famously, three Silicon Valley creative geniuses have been college dropouts: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerberg. Steve Jobs—for many, the archetype of the creative person—popularized the motto “Think different.” Because their thinking is different, my subjects often express the idea that standard ways of learning and teaching are not always helpful and may even be distracting, and that they prefer to learn on their own. Many of my subjects taught themselves to read before even starting school, and many have read widely throughout their lives.

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

This observation has important implications for the education of creatively gifted children. They need to be allowed and even encouraged to “think different.”

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

Creative people tend to be very persistent, even when confronted with skepticism or rejection

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

Perseverance … In order to have that freedom to find things out, you have to have perseverance …

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

Part of creativity is picking the little bubbles that come up to your conscious mind, and picking which one to let grow and which one to give access to more of your mind, and then have that translate into action.”

April Lindley

Shared May 24, 2017

Some people see things others cannot, and they are right, and we call them creative geniuses. Some people see things others cannot, and they are wrong, and we call them mentally ill

Elisabeth Thunderberry

Shared May 8, 2018

creativity squashed these days living in self preservation mode...#hated

April Lindley

Shared December 20, 2017

Those who have been eminent in philosophy, politics, poetry, and the arts have all had tendencies toward melancholia.” This pattern is a recurring theme in Shakespeare’s plays, such as when Theseus, in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, observes, “The lunatic, the lover, and the poet / Are of imagination all compact.” John Dryden made a similar point in a heroic couplet: “Great wits are sure to madness near allied, / And thin partitions do their bounds divide.”