Must Read on Pocket

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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Akshat Rathi

Shared September 21, 2016

The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition. Worse, students often believe they understand something when, in fact, they don’t.

Oz Lubling

Shared February 2, 2017

As studies of chess masters, emergency room physicians, and fighter pilots have shown, in times of critical stress, conscious analysis of a situation is replaced by quick, subconscious processing as these experts rapidly draw on their deeply ingrained repertoire of neural subroutines—chunks.

Supreeth S

Shared September 19, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Olli Sulopuisto

Shared September 26, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Guilherme Silva

Shared September 17, 2016

As parents and teachers, we can use simple, accessible methods for deepening understanding and making it useful and flexible. We can encourage others and ourselves to try new disciplines that we thought were too hard—math, dance, physics, language, chemistry, music—opening new worlds for ourselves and others.

Muhammad Syarif Ali Akbarsyah

Shared September 23, 2016

This article shows how we correlate space beyond knowledges. One of the approach was impaired by an army

Czar Carbonel

Shared October 10, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Santi Roman

Shared September 28, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Brian

Shared October 9, 2016

"The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition. Worse, students often believe they understand something when, in fact, they don’t. By championing the importance of understanding, teachers can inadvertently set their students up for failure as those students blunder in illusions of competence. As one (failing) engineering student recently told me: “I just don’t see how I could have done so poorly. I understood it when you taught it in class.” My student may have thought he’d understood it at the time, and perhaps he did, but he’d never practiced using the concept to truly internalize it. He had not developed any kind of procedural fluency or ability to apply what he thought he understood."

Brian

Shared October 9, 2016

"Fluency allows understanding to become embedded, emerging when needed."

Benjamin Ho

Shared February 2, 2017

The main lesson is to revise and practice.

"Looking back, I realize that I didn’t have to just blindly follow my initial inclinations and passions. The “fluency” part of me that loved literature and language was also the same part of me that ultimately fell in love with math and science—and transformed and enriched my life."

Renee Chen

Shared February 25, 2017

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Mr. Thoro

Shared September 27, 2016

chunks were envisioned as the varying neural counterparts of different chess patterns. Gradually, neuroscientists came to realize that experts such as chess grand masters are experts because they have stored thousands of chunks of knowledge about their area of expertise in their long-term memory. Chess masters, for example, can recall tens of thousands of different chess patterns. Whatever the discipline, experts can call up to consciousness one or several of these well-knit-together, chunked neural subroutines to analyze and react to a new learning situation

John Schipper

Shared January 29, 2017

Mind for Numbers: How to Excel at Math and Science (Even If
 You Flunked Algebra).

Alex Chen

Shared September 18, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Muhammad Eimaduddin

Shared September 17, 2016

Barbara Oakley, creater of How to Learn course in Coursera

Haley Houseman

Shared October 12, 2016

Really enjoyed this marriage of how and way we learn

Muhammad Eimaduddin

Shared February 5, 2017

2nd time reading this. Still worth it.

David Cullinan

Shared September 17, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding.

Nuel Sitanggang

Shared September 20, 2016

I have her ebook, but haven't read it yet .

Grace Jaucian

Shared November 16, 2017

@languagemajors

Joshwin Greene

Shared September 20, 2016

Great article.

Cristiana Martin

Shared September 29, 2016

Definetely one of my all time favorite stories! Must read!

Maarten Meijer

Shared September 19, 2016

with

Ezra

Shared October 8, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Nghi Le Vinh

Shared September 30, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Nghi Le Vinh

Shared September 30, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Nghi Le Vinh

Shared September 30, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Hasan Hasan

Shared October 10, 2016

conjugating

Leanne W

Shared February 13, 2017

"Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency."

Mark Downey

Shared September 16, 2016

The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition.

Libby Cheney

Shared October 10, 2016

Toward new horizons...

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Ash Christie

Shared November 7, 2016

Great article that sheds light on the learning process.

Pammy Chua

Shared November 16, 2017

Fluency of something whole like a language requires a kind of familiarity that only repeated and varied interaction with the parts can develop. Where my language classmates had often been content to concentrate on simply understanding Russian they heard or read, I instead tried to gain an internalized, deep-rooted fluency with the words and language structure. I wouldn’t just be satisfied to know that понимать meant “to understand.” I’d practice with the verb—putting it through its paces by conjugating it repeatedly with all sorts of tenses, and then moving on to putting it into sentences, and then finally to understanding not only when to use this form of the verb, but also when not to use it. I practiced recalling all these aspects and variations quickly. After all, through practice, you can understand and translate dozens—even thousands— of words in another language. But if you aren’t fluent, when someone throws a bunch of words at you quickly, as with normal speaking (which always sounds horrifically fast when you’re learning a new language), you have no idea what they’re actually saying, even though technically you understand all the component words and structure.

Anna K

Shared January 30, 2017

Say "I'm not gifted for math" one more time. Or something about girls' lesser abilities.

Fitri

Shared September 27, 2016

The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition.

Василий Ковальчук

Shared October 10, 2016

Working for the Russians was fun and engrossing—but it was also a superficially glamorous form of migrant work. You go to sea during fishing season, make a decent salary while getting drunk all the time, then go back to port when the season’s over and hope they’ll rehire you next year.

CAL

Shared September 20, 2016

Language learning provided the fundamentals of neuroplasticity

Valeria Molero

Shared October 29, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding.

David Friml

Shared September 16, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Jorge Mendes

Shared September 17, 2016

I recomend also Barbara's book "a mind for Numbers" and her coursera course "learning how to learn"

Akshat Agrawal

Shared January 18, 2017

A simple approach focussing on the correct attitude to learn anything in life. Mastery can be only gained by practice and therr is no other short cut to it. Beautifully penned down article by the author on the importance of practice.

This approach—which focused on fluency instead of simple understanding—put me at the top of the class.

gs Saldanha

Shared March 4, 2017

"fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency."

Christian Arentsen

Shared October 18, 2016

Amazing and very inspiring!

Ryan Fadholi

Shared September 21, 2016

FYI, penulisnya juga instruktur course "Learning How to Learn" di Coursera.

Both the article and the course is recommended!

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency

Daniel Andersen

Shared August 18, 2017

understanding, after all, is facile, and can easily slip away.

Daniel Andersen

Shared August 18, 2017

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency