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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Guillaume VENDÉ

Shared March 17, 2017

Hey ! Je recommande un article intéressant par jour sur http://getpocket.com/@GuillaumeVende !

Hampus Jakobsson

Shared December 29, 2016

A wise person told me recently: "There is more to life than to speed it up." Hard when you are impatient like me, but I'm working on it :)

Aditya Sankaran

Shared April 5, 2017

"The rush of society may affect our sense of timing and emotions in another way. Neuroscientists like Moore have shown that time seems to pass faster when we have a direct connection to a subsequent event, when we feel we’ve caused a particular outcome. They call the experience “temporal binding.” Conversely, says Moore, “When we have, or feel we have, no control over events, the opposite happens: The internal clock speeds up, meaning we experience intervals as longer.”"

How the theory of relativity has a role to play in the rage you feel about the world around you slowing down.

rendan

Shared April 27, 2017

Our rejection of slowness is especially apparent when it comes to technology. “Everything is so efficient nowadays,” Wittmann says. “We’re less and less able to wait patiently.” We now practically insist that Web pages load in a quarter of a second, when we had no problem with two seconds in 2009 and four seconds in 2006. As of 2012, videos that didn’t load in two seconds had little hope of going viral.

Nick Heynen

Shared December 23, 2016

Really on point for people like me.

Things that our great-great-grandparents would have found miraculously efficient now drive us around the bend. Patience is a virtue that’s been vanquished in the Twitter age.

Deirdre Remida Conde

Shared February 1, 2017

Well-researched piece on the individual internal pace

One study showed that exposing people to “the ultimate symbols of impatience culture”—fast-food symbols like McDonald’s golden arches—increases their reading speed and preference for time-saving products, and makes them more likely to opt for small rewards now over larger ones later.

Abhilash Pattnaik

Shared February 19, 2017

Brilliant!

Jasen Farmer

Shared December 21, 2016

Why #evolution is to blame for increasing impatience #mindfulness @NautilusMag

“Why are we impatient? It’s a heritage from our evolution,” says Marc Wittmann, a psychologist at the Institute for Frontier Areas of Psychology and Mental Health in Freiburg, Germany. Impatience made sure we didn’t die from spending too long on a single unrewarding activity. It gave us the impulse to act.

But that good thing is gone. The fast pace of society has thrown our internal timer out of balance. It creates expectations that can’t be rewarded fast enough—or rewarded at all. When things move more slowly than we expect, our internal timer even plays tricks on us, stretching out the wait, summoning anger out of proportion to the delay.

Erdogan Cesmeli

Shared December 20, 2016

For my impatient friends (like me)... Another trick is to think of something positive.

Addie K. Martin

Shared February 26, 2017

Fascinating stuff... of course the internet is partially to blame... #faster

Sam Chan

Shared January 1, 2017

Counting your blessings—even if they have nothing to do with the delay at hand—may remind you of the value of being a member of a cooperative human society and the importance of “not being a jerk,

Igor Chechulin

Shared January 9, 2017

Полезная статья. Здесь не только про ускорение темпа жизни, но и про то, что с этим делать.

Dee Urtua

Shared February 27, 2017

begs the debate again if this society is becoming rude

Angharad Dalton

Shared April 9, 2017

Are you impatient too?

Ali Ishaq

Shared January 9, 2017

"...gratitude is a mental shortcut to more patience..."

Andriy Bezemchuk

Shared December 21, 2016

Impatience made sure we didn’t die from spending too long on a single unrewarding activity. It gave us the impulse to act.

Mia Lei

Shared January 1, 2017

gratitude as step one/replacement for mindfulness in combating impatience

Research has shown meditation and mindfulness—a practice of focusing on the present—helps with impatience, although it’s not entirely clear why. It could be meditators are better able to cope with the emotional fallout of impatience because they’re more used to it.

People who meditate “make friends with uncomfortable space,” says Ethan Nichtern, a New York City-based senior meditation teacher in the Shambhala Buddhist tradition, and author of the forthcoming The Road Home: A Contemporary Exploration of the Buddhist Path. Meditation provides “a technique for just meeting the present moment as it is, without trying to change the situation.”

However, says DeSteno, regular meditation practice isn’t something impatient people are likely to practice. He suggests fighting emotion with emotion. He has found that gratitude is a mental shortcut to more patience.

Amirreza H.

Shared February 24, 2017

The result is a less-than-virtuous cycle. The accelerating pace of society resets our internal timers, which then go off more often in response to slow things, putting us in a constant state of rage and impulsiveness. Your mileage may vary, of course, but overall, “we are getting to be a more and more impulsive society,” Wittmann says.

Amirreza H.

Shared February 24, 2017

Time stretches when we are frightened or anxious, Hammond explains. An arachnophobe overestimates the time spent in a room with a spider; a fearful novice skydiver, the time spent hurtling to Earth. People in car accidents report watching events unfold in slow motion. But it’s not because our brains speed up in those situations. Time warps because our experiences are so intense. Every moment when we are under threat seems new and vivid. That physiological survival mechanism amplifies our awareness and packs more memories than usual into a short time interval. Our brains are tricked into thinking more time has passed.

Amirreza H.

Shared February 24, 2017

On top of that, our brains—in particular, the insular cortex, linked to motor skills and perception—may measure the passing of time in part by integrating many different signals from our bodies, like our heartbeats, the tickle of a breeze on our skin, and the burning heat of rage. In this model, the brain judges time by counting the number of signals it is getting from the body. So if the signals come faster, over a given interval the brain will count more signals, and so it will seem that the interval has taken longer than it actually has.

Amirreza H.

Shared March 11, 2017

There’s another downside to the willpower approach. Using our willpower for one thing seems to make us more susceptible to the next temptation, says Northeastern University psychologist David DeSteno, who admits to being “the guy that sighs in the Starbucks line.” If he uses all of his self-control to stay silent in line, he might give in to a craving for a Double Chocolate Chunk Brownie when he gets to the front.

Soumik Banerjee

Shared December 23, 2016

Meditation provides “a technique for just meeting the present moment as it is, without trying to change the situation.”

Soumik Banerjee

Shared December 23, 2016

gratitude is a mental shortcut to more patience

Ingvild Hunsrød

Shared January 13, 2017

Hater å gå sakte.

Dhwaneet Bhatt

Shared January 27, 2017

Excellent quote on why we get frustrated so easily

Frustration is often a consequence of expectations being violated.”

Layla Dash

Shared March 12, 2017

People who meditate “make friends with uncomfortable space,”

Yana Zorina

Shared April 20, 2017

I can totally relate!

Russell Mclean

Shared December 30, 2016

Seems like a good thing to work on in 2017

Mohit Verma

Shared December 21, 2016

. “A lot is dependent on expectation—if we expect something to take time then we can accept it. Frustration is often a consequence of expectations being violated.”

THOM BYXBE

Shared December 24, 2016

Meditation provides “a technique for just meeting the present moment as it is, without trying to change the situation.”

Alice Nucifora

Shared January 5, 2017

The physiological reason why crowds are literally torture :")

Joy Findley

Shared January 30, 2017

now

Sean Trinidad

Shared February 1, 2017

Impatience made sure we didn’t die from spending too long on a single unrewarding activity.

Deepak Tomar

Shared February 6, 2017

Neuroscientists like Moore have shown that time seems to pass faster when we have a direct connection to a subsequent event, when we feel we’ve caused a particular outcome. They call the experience “temporal binding.” Conversely, says Moore, “When we have, or feel we have, no control over events, the opposite happens: The internal clock speeds up, meaning we experience intervals as longer.”

James Wood

Shared February 10, 2017

Great article!! ... Frustration is often a consequence of expectations being violated.”

Frustration is often a consequence of expectations being violated.”

joE

Shared February 24, 2017

cool.😉

DJ Sekar

Shared March 12, 2017

we are getting to be a more and more impulsive society. but hey, meditation could solve the problem.

Максим Микитин

Shared March 27, 2017

The Kyivstar internet connection speed vexing me out 😆 it's evolution babe

viral

Chris Raw

Shared April 5, 2017

They timed random people as they walked over a distance of 60 feet. In Vienna, Austria, where I live, pedestrians covered the ground in a respectable 14 seconds. But in my former home of New York, pedestrians zoomed by in 12 seconds. In the 2000s, psychologist Richard Wiseman found worldwide walking speeds had gone up by 10 percent.

Chris Raw

Shared April 5, 2017

We now practically insist that Web pages load in a quarter of a second, when we had no problem with two seconds in 2009 and four seconds in 2006. As of 2012, videos that didn’t load in two seconds had little hope of going viral.

Chris Raw

Shared April 5, 2017

We now practically insist that Web pages load in a quarter of a second, when we had no problem with two seconds in 2009 and four seconds in 2006. As of 2012, videos that didn’t load in two seconds had little hope of going viral.

Chris Raw

Shared April 5, 2017

In this model, the brain judges time by counting the number of signals it is getting from the body. So if the signals come faster, over a given interval the brain will count more signals, and so it will seem that the interval has taken longer than it actually has.

Chris Raw

Shared April 5, 2017

The rush of society may affect our sense of timing and emotions in another way. Neuroscientists like Moore have shown that time seems to pass faster when we have a direct connection to a subsequent event, when we feel we’ve caused a particular outcome. They call the experience “temporal binding.” Conversely, says Moore, “When we have, or feel we have, no control over events, the opposite happens: The internal clock speeds up, meaning we experience intervals as longer.”

Katrina Harris

Shared May 4, 2017

I am guilty of the need for speed.

Oda Celine

Shared December 27, 2016

Guilty.

Javier Carrillo Milla

Shared December 31, 2016

nice but a bit apologetic... science its not there so you can be more lazy. Patience is always been a skill

Adriel Flores

Shared December 31, 2016

Counting your blessings—even if they have nothing to do with the delay at hand—may remind you of the value of being a member of a cooperative human society and the importance of “not being a jerk,” DeSteno says.

Counting your blessings—even if they have nothing to do with the delay at hand—may remind you of the value of being a member of a cooperative human society and the importance of “not being a jerk,” DeSteno says.

Barış GÜZEL

Shared January 1, 2017

Claudia Hammond in her 2012 book Time Warped: Unlocking the Mysteries of Time Perception. “Just as Einstein’s theory of relativity tells us that there is no such thing as absolute time, neither is there an absolute mechanism for measuring time in the brain,” she writes.

Barış GÜZEL

Shared January 1, 2017

Time stretches when we are frightened or anxious, Hammond explains. An arachnophobe overestimates the time spent in a room with a spider; a fearful novice skydiver, the time spent hurtling to Earth. People in car accidents report watching events unfold in slow motion. But it’s not because our brains speed up in those situations. Time warps because our experiences are so intense. Every moment when we are under threat seems new and vivid. That physiological survival mechanism amplifies our awareness and packs more memories than usual into a short time interval. Our brains are tricked into thinking more time has passed

Barış GÜZEL

Shared January 1, 2017

The rush of society may affect our sense of timing and emotions in another way. Neuroscientists like Moore have shown that time seems to pass faster when we have a direct connection to a subsequent event, when we feel we’ve caused a particular outcome. They call the experience “temporal binding.” Conversely, says Moore, “When we have, or feel we have, no control over events, the opposite happens: The internal clock speeds up, meaning we experience intervals as longer