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Recommendations from Pocket Users

David Hale

Shared August 20, 2017

This story would be terrific in its own right, but the parallels to our current political climate are so overtly striking that it really serves as a reminder that our problems are societal. Trump and fad diets are just symptoms.

Wesley Verhoeve

Shared August 11, 2017

This is a wonderfully written and comprehensive article. Fantastic.

Sean O'Kane

Shared August 12, 2017

clean eating confirms how vulnerable and lost millions of us feel about diet – which really means how lost we feel about our own bodies. We are so unmoored that we will put our faith in any master who promises us that we, too, can become pure and good.

Lauren Reynolds

Shared September 7, 2017

One of the things that makes the new wave of wellness cookbooks so appealing is that they assure the reader that they offer a new way of eating that comes without any fear or guilt.

Alex Henke

Shared August 13, 2017

gluten-free, sugar-free, oil-free, grain-free, legume-free, plant-based raw vegan

Alex Henke

Shared August 13, 2017

For as long as people have eaten food, there have been diets and quack cures

Alex Henke

Shared August 13, 2017

a world of “quinoa bowls” and “nutribollocks” fuelled by the modern information age

Santiago Suarez Ordonez

Shared August 24, 2017

Among other things, clean eating confirms how vulnerable and lost millions of us feel about diet – which really means how lost we feel about our own bodies.

Rakesh Gupta

Shared August 14, 2017

The oh-so-Instagrammable food movement has been thoroughly debunked – but it shows no signs of going away. The real question is why we were so desperate to believe it. "Among other things, clean eating confirms how vulnerable and lost millions of us feel about diet – which really means how lost we feel about our own bodies."

Justin Ng

Shared October 15, 2017

“Giles Yeo – who spent some time cooking a spicy sweet-potato dish with Ella Mills for his BBC programme – agrees that many of the clean eating recipes he tried are actually “a tasty and cool way to cook vegetables”. But why, Yeo asks, do these authors not simply say “I am publishing a very good vegetarian cookbook” and stop there, instead of making larger claims about the power of vegetables to beautify or prevent disease? “The poison comes from the fact that they are wrapping the whole thing up in pseudoscience,” Yeo says. “If you base something on falsehoods, it empowers people to take extreme actions, and this is where the harm begins.””

Renee Chen

Shared August 14, 2017

The poison comes from the fact that they are wrapping the whole thing up in pseudoscience,” Yeo says. “If you base something on falsehoods, it empowers people to take extreme actions, and this is where the harm begins.”

Mr. Thoro

Shared August 14, 2017

Basically doctors right?

Almost all of the authors of the British clean eating bestsellers started off as bloggers or Instagrammers, many of them beautiful women in their early 20s who were genuinely convinced that the diets they had invented had cured them of various chronic ailments.

Nathan Maharaj

Shared August 17, 2017

You can’t found a new faith system with the words “I am publishing a very good vegetarian cookbook”.

Henry Babbage

Shared August 17, 2017

Among the affluent classes who already ate a healthier-than-average diet, the Instagram goddesses created a new model of dietary perfection to aim for. For the rest of the population, however, it simply placed the ideal of healthy food ever further out of reach. Behind the shiny covers of the clean-eating books, there is a harsh form of economic exclusion that says that someone who can’t afford wheatgrass or spirulina can never be truly “well”.

Henry Babbage

Shared August 17, 2017

Among the affluent classes who already ate a healthier-than-average diet, the Instagram goddesses created a new model of dietary perfection to aim for. For the rest of the population, however, it simply placed the ideal of healthy food ever further out of reach. Behind the shiny covers of the clean-eating books, there is a harsh form of economic exclusion that says that someone who can’t afford wheatgrass or spirulina can never be truly “well”.

Christos Zisopoulos

Shared August 11, 2017

If you base something on falsehoods, it empowers people to take extreme actions, and this is where the harm begins.”

Lukas

Shared August 18, 2017

#eatclean...not

Addie K. Martin

Shared September 13, 2017

Long read but good food for thought...

Pedro Arellano

Shared August 14, 2017

..there is a harsh form of economic exclusion that says that someone who can’t afford wheatgrass or spirulina can never be truly “well”.

Jean Regalo

Shared August 15, 2017

Clean eating – whether it is called that or not – is perhaps best seen as a dysfunctional response to a still more dysfunctional food supply: a dream of purity in a toxic world. To walk into a modern western supermarket is to be assailed by aisle upon aisle of salty, oily snacks and sugary cereals, of “bread” that has been neither proved nor fermented, of cheap, sweetened drinks and meat from animals kept in inhumane conditions.

Rae Rahman

Shared August 15, 2017

Among other things, clean eating confirms how vulnerable and lost millions of us feel about diet – which really means how lost we feel about our own bodies.

Arshad Pooloo

Shared March 29, 2018

The Blonde Vegan, Younger was a “wellness” blogger in New York City, one of thousands on Instagram (where she had 70,000 followers) rallying under the hashtag #eatclean. Although she had no qualifications as a nutritionist, Younger had sold more than 40,000 copies of her own $25, five-day “cleanse” programme – a formula for an all-raw, plant-based diet majoring on green juice.

But the “clean” diet that Younger was selling as the route to health was making its creator sick. Far from being super-healthy, she was suffering from a serious eating disorder: orthorexia

Pablo Massa

Shared August 14, 2017

Uruguay represent.

Sherlock Lam

Shared January 6, 2018

Avocados now outsell oranges in the UK.

Orlando Trejo

Shared August 14, 2017

In 2016, 18 out the 20 top sellers in Amazon UK’s food and drink book category had a focus on healthy eating and dieting. The irony, however, was that the kind of well-researched books Dolamore and others once published no longer tended to sell so well, because health publishing was now dominated by social media celebrities.

Orlando Trejo

Shared August 15, 2017

Amelia Freer, in Eat. Nourish. Glow, admits that “we can’t prove that dairy is the cause” of ailments ranging from IBS to joint pain, but concludes that it’s “surely worth” cutting dairy out anyway, just as a precaution. In another context, Freer writes that “I’m told it takes 17 years for scientific knowledge to filter down” to become general knowledge, while advising that gluten should be avoided. Once we enter the territory where all authority and expertise are automatically suspect, you can start to claim almost anything – and many #eatclean authorities do.

Hana K

Shared August 17, 2017

Interesting facts about root, kale and avo cado boom and the danger of diet sects!

Rostislav Roznoshchik

Shared September 2, 2017

I had no idea this was such a divisive issue. It seems to me that common sense needs to be applied to all things, but I guess that with our lack of knowledge, common sense is hard to find.

Brian LaLonde

Shared August 12, 2017

the miracle of turning beetroot and kale into objects of desire

David Maddock

Shared September 4, 2017

Great read. Time for another coffee.

“The poison comes from the fact that they are wrapping the whole thing up in pseudoscience,” Yeo says. “If you base something on falsehoods, it empowers people to take extreme actions, and this is where the harm begins.”

Tino Rijnders

Shared November 5, 2017

For all the avocado fanboys

Shravan Panyam

Shared December 29, 2017

This was a really eye opening read. We are constantly bombarded with strong opinions everywhere we look. And when we are not well informed on these topics, we can easily fall into a belief system without even realizing it.

What further lubricates this slippery slope of belief is the fact that most of the representatives for these belief systems appear successful, attractive, and charismatic. The things they project are the very objects of our unspoken desires when we are out of touch with our fullness. Silently, cusiosity can turn into conviction without the need for any evidence.

When you see a thousand attractive health gurus talk about something for years, it is easy to accept as fact. Certianly these products just cost more because they are better for us.

We start to take for granted that which we see and hear all the time. And just like that, one starts to believe.

Nikola Kotur

Shared August 16, 2017

Almost all of the authors of the British clean eating bestsellers started off as bloggers or Instagrammers, many of them beautiful women in their early 20s

Evan Zeisel

Shared August 23, 2017

Long but fascinating as a study not only on "eating clean" but our society that has forgotten how to look at facts and instead believes sudo-science and attacks those with real knowledge over those with social media celebrity.

Tara Martin

Shared August 25, 2017

The history of "clean eating" (aka marketing orthorexia) is fascinating.

Roman K

Shared August 28, 2017

science, marketing, trust, desire.

William Wells

Shared August 19, 2017

o walk into a modern western supermarket is to be assailed by aisle upon aisle of salty, oily snacks and sugary cereals, of “bread” that has been neither proved nor fermented, of cheap, sweetened drinks and meat from animals kept in inhumane conditions.

Sawah Shitstorm

Shared August 13, 2017

So interesting. Another example of liberals, "clean" eaters, squashing debate and facts. Also, more confirmation that crazy diets lead to anorexia....

I can pinpoint the exact moment that my own feelings about clean eating changed from ambivalence to outright dislike. I was on stage at the Cheltenham literary festival with dietician Renee McGregor (who works both with Olympic athletes and eating disorder sufferers) when a crowd of around 300 clean-eating fans started jeering and shouting at us. We were supposedly taking part in a clean-eating debate with “nutritionist” Madeleine Shaw, author of Get the Glow and Ready Steady Glow.

strangey

Shared August 15, 2017

You can’t found a new faith system with the words “I am publishing a very good vegetarian cookbook”.

John Herse

Shared December 24, 2017

Among other things, clean eating confirms how vulnerable and lost millions of us feel about diet – which really means how lost we feel about our own bodies. We are so unmoored that we will put our faith in any master who promises us that we, too, can become pure and good.

Duncan Maxwell

Shared August 15, 2017

A diet of absolutes

Arielle Norman

Shared August 19, 2017

Yes!

Paul Kuhne

Shared November 16, 2017

An interesting and well-argued take on the advent and explosive growth of the clean eating diet. Although we still struggle with a commercial food system that is bad for our overall health, the clean eating diet has risen to prominence on pseudo science and fanaticism. A life of moderation may be ok after all.

Azizul Rahman Ismail

Shared January 8, 2018

A story about food and the horrors of humanity.

Nora M.

Shared September 4, 2017

But it quickly became clear that “clean eating” was more than a diet; it was a belief system, which propagated the idea that the way most people eat is not simply fattening, but impure.

Elliot Gerchak

Shared August 13, 2017

To walk into a modern western supermarket is to be assailed by aisle upon aisle of salty, oily snacks and sugary cereals, of “bread” that has been neither proved nor fermented, of cheap, sweetened drinks and meat from animals kept in inhumane conditions.

Paul Lawley-Jones

Shared August 12, 2017

"To insist on the facts made us come across as cruelly negative. We had punctured the happy belief-bubble of glowiness that they had come to imbibe from Shaw. It’s striking that in many of the wellness cookbooks, mainstream scientific evidence on diet is seen as more or less irrelevant, not least because the gurus see the complacency of science as part of what made our diets so bad in the first place."

As always, it's not about what you eat but the quantities in which you eat them.

But that isn't a good advertising slogan.

William Rhoden

Shared September 4, 2017

Interestingly long article on "clean" eating.

Olly Offord

Shared August 31, 2017

Avocados now outsell oranges in the UK