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Recommendations from Pocket Users

stacy-marie ishmael

Shared August 4, 2016

The interchangeability, ceaseless movement, and symbolic blankness that was once the hallmark of hotels and airports, qualities that led the French anthropologist Marc Augé to define them in 1992 as "non-places," has leaked into the rest of life.

Colin Nagy (@CJN)

Shared August 3, 2016

Interesting ideas in here.

Wesley Verhoeve

Shared September 14, 2017

Such a thought provoking article.

Nicole Zhu

Shared August 3, 2016

"Aesthetic homogeneity is a product that users are coming to demand, and tech investors are catching on."

Bill Couch

Shared August 5, 2016

Commoditization of living aesthetics, which sometimes, I'm fine with.

david mcqueen

Shared October 9, 2016

8. Great piece about the danger of homogeneity #DamGoodRead

John Collins

Shared October 28, 2016

the same raw wood tables, exposed brick, and hanging Edison bulbs

J N

Shared May 15, 2018

Pocket recommended this 2-year-old article to me and I'm glad because this is good thinking, the type of thinking that doesn't occur to you until someone else says it really cogently

Paul Cothenet

Shared December 4, 2016

Which I'm of course reading in a coffee shop with Edison light bulbs... In Flagstaff, Arizona

Katya S

Shared March 25, 2017

Scale vs imperfection

Among the phenomenon’s consequences is depersonalization, in the psychiatric sense: "a state in which one loses all sense of identity." I personally like the AirSpace style. I can’t say no to a tasteful, clean, modern life space. But thinking through its roots and negative implications makes me reconsider my attachment. It’s hard to identify with something so empty at its core.

In the advent of AirSpace, our options are limited. The first is finding "the advantages of blankness," as Koolhaas writes, becoming connoisseurs of "the color variations in the fluorescent lighting of an office building just before sunset, the subtleties of the slightly different whites of an illuminated sign at night." Kanyi Maqubela, the Roam investor, sees meaning in the generic from an unexpected source. "If you go to Catholic church in most parts of the world, the mass is going to feel like the mass. There is still a sense of unity," he says. "We’re starting to enter the world where these private companies have some of that magic to them, the notion of feeling at home across time zones in any country."

Olli Sulopuisto

Shared August 7, 2016

Natascha Folens, an interior decorator and Airbnb consultant in the Washington, DC area.

Gautam Ramdurai

Shared October 24, 2016

We could call this strange geography created by technology "AirSpace." It’s the realm of coffee shops, bars, startup offices, and co-live / work spaces that share the same hallmarks everywhere you go

Matt Grinberg

Shared December 15, 2016

Cynical, but not untrue.

the coffee roaster Four Barrel in San Francisco looks like the Australian Toby’s Estate in Brooklyn looks like The Coffee Collective in Copenhagen looks like Bear Pond Espresso in Tokyo

Marius Masalar

Shared August 15, 2016

I've noticed this in my own travels. Can't decide if it bothers me or not, especially since I tend to like certain aspects of this aesthetic. Great read either way.

If we can be equally at home everywhere, as Roam and Airbnb suggest, doesn’t that mean we are also at home nowhere? The next question is, do we mind?

Rachel Premack

Shared December 14, 2016

But what makes Airbnb different is its decentralization. Like Schwarzmann’s copycat cafes, its aesthetic arises from tens of thousands of people making the same independent decisions rather than a corporate mandate.

Aarón García del Real Lozano

Shared August 4, 2016

Si se preguntan por qué todos los cafecitos y hoteles hipsters son iguales, culpen al internet (como todo)

Alex Murrell

Shared August 25, 2018

A look at how Silicon Valley helps spread the same sterile aesthetic across the world.

Rodrigo Peñalba

Shared November 23, 2016

El look AirBnB. Viaja por todo el mundo sin cambiar realmente de lugar.

Shrey Goyal

Shared August 12, 2017

“…startups are creating this globalized sameness-as-a-service in a self-enclosed package, a holistic AirSpace lifestyle.”

Sarah Mansoura

Shared December 6, 2016

Cassez vos portables, larguez tout et venez élever des chèvres en Lozère

technology is also shaping the physical world, influencing the places we go and how we behave in areas of our lives that didn’t heretofore seem so digital. Think of the traffic app Waze rerouting cars in Los Angeles and disrupting otherwise quiet neighborhoods; Airbnb parachuting groups of international tourists into residential communities; Instagram spreading IRL lifestyle memes; or Foursquare sending traveling businessmen to the same cafe over and over again

Juventud Revolucionaria Ernesto Guevara

Shared December 11, 2016

The homogeneity of these spaces means that traveling between them is frictionless, a value that Silicon Valley prizes and cultural influencers like Schwarzmann take advantage of. Changing places can be as painless as reloading a website. You might not even realize you’re not where you started.

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"Digital platforms like Foursquare are producing "a harmonization of tastes" across the world, Schwarzmann says. "It creates you going to the same place all over again.""

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

" "AirSpace." It’s the realm of coffee shops, bars, startup offices, and co-live / work spaces that share the same hallmarks everywhere you go: a profusion of symbols of comfort and quality, at least to a certain connoisseurial mindset."

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"Minimalist furniture. Craft beer and avocado toast. Reclaimed wood. Industrial lighting. Cortados. Fast internet. The homogeneity of these spaces means that traveling between them is frictionless, a value that Silicon Valley prizes and cultural influencers like Schwarzmann take advantage of. "

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"Changing places can be as painless as reloading a website. "

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"Schwarzmann’s cafe phenomenon recalls what the architect Rem Koolhaas noticed in his prophetic essay "The Generic City,""

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"In a sense, Airbnb became an interactive lifestyle magazine."

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"It offered a vision of possessiveness, in which visitors consume recognizable symbols rather than encountering unfamiliar ones: "The local coffee shop is yours, too.""

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

" it seems that what consumers want more than an exotic experience is something like a Days Inn but more stylish and less obvious — a generic space hidden behind a seemingly unique facade."

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"Roam, an international "co-living" startup that promises its users — "Roamers" — the ability to move freely across residences in different countries for a monthly fee of $2,000 (or $500 per week). The company raised $3.4 million in funding in May, and currently manages spaces in Ubud, Bali; Miami; and Madrid. Buenos Aires and London are coming soon"

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"desirable places should be both specific enough to be interesting and generic enough to be as convenient as possible, consumed quickly and easily — equal parts authentic and expendable. "

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"George W.S. Trow wrote in his paranoiac masterpiece of media criticism, "Within the Context of No Context," "

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"aesthetic gentrification… divides the new world map in the light of a softer post-Cold War prejudice: the fashionable and the unfashionable world." In other words, we are experiencing an isolationism of style versus one of politics or physical geography, though it still falls along economic lines"

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

""I picture Western guests walking up, stepping inside, and you’re interacting with the community from the minute you arrive," "

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"It’s a bubble, a lot of things that are reinforcing our bubble. I’m definitely part of the described problem. White, male, privileged and I travel a lot."

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

" "a state in which one loses all sense of identity." "

Anna Savina

Shared March 13, 2017

"nightmare version of AirSpace that could spread room by room, cafe by cafe across the world."

Guillermo López Linares

Shared October 31, 2017

Yet the AirSpace aesthetic that Airbnb has contributed to, and the geography it creates, limits experiences of difference in the service of comforting a particular demographic ("the vanilla tourist") falsely defined as the norm. It is a "hallucination of the normal," as Koolhaas writes. This is the harmful illusion that so much technology, and technological culture, perpetuates: if you do not fit within its predefined structures as an effective user, you must be doing something wrong.

Cole Kennedy

Shared August 8, 2016

I'm conflicted by this phenomenon, and I think that's what Chayka is getting to: It's strange and soulless but also comforting. What are the implications going to be? What happens when Mid-Century style stops being in vogue?

Yohan John

Shared September 14, 2016

we now have a global grid of 1.6 billion: Facebook’s population of monthly active users, all acting and interacting more or less within the same space, learning to see and feel and want the same things.

The connective emotional grid of social media platforms is what drives the impression of AirSpace. If taste is globalized, then the logical endpoint is a world in which aesthetic diversity decreases. It resembles a kind of gentrification: one that happens concurrently across global urban centers. Just as a gentrifying neighborhood starts to look less diverse as buildings are renovated and storefronts replaced, so economically similar urban areas around the world might increasingly resemble each other and become interchangeable.

Gaurav Rekhi

Shared September 14, 2017

When it comes to making a new theme come alive, this article is really enjoyable to read !

Pantelis K.

Shared May 13, 2017

As an affluent, self-selecting group of people move through spaces linked by technology, particular sensibilities spread, and these small pockets of geography grow to resemble one another, as Schwarzmann discovered: the coffee roaster Four Barrel in San Francisco looks like the Australian Toby’s Estate in Brooklyn looks like The Coffee Collective in Copenhagen looks like Bear Pond Espresso in Tokyo. You can get a dry cortado with perfect latte art at any of them, then Instagram it on a marble countertop and further spread the aesthetic to your followers.

Brant S

Shared December 14, 2017

"the advantages of blankness"

Nick Montoya

Shared August 9, 2016

In a sense, Airbnb became an interactive lifestyle magazine.

Mark Vitazko

Shared January 9, 2017

It’s funny how you want these really generic things but also want authenticity, too

Vijay Shankar Venkataraman

Shared October 12, 2018

Disappointed to see Airbnb driving homogenization of spaced across the world.

Roberto Muñoz

Shared August 9, 2016

Interesante artículo sobre cómo la decoración está convergiendo. El AirSpace tiene cosas buenas y otras malas, pero cuanto menos es curioso.

Murty MVR

Shared June 23, 2017

Technology aiding a new form of gentrification? Interesting idea, this. If only a little too restricted to places of stay. Culture is definitely more than just that. :)

Megan Allison Wade

Shared

the coffee roaster Four Barrel in San Francisco looks like the Australian Toby’s Estate in Brooklyn looks like The Coffee Collective in Copenhagen looks like Bear Pond Espresso in Tokyo.

Luke Buckle

Shared August 5, 2016

Long-winded and highfalutin but also a bit clever

Mr. Thoro

Shared March 3, 2017

Once you take the place of the people who live there, you can head out to their favorite coffee shops, bars, or workspaces, which will be instantly recognizable because they look just like the apartment that you’re living in. You will probably enjoy it. You might think, ‘This is nice, I am comfortable.’ And then you can move on to the next one, only a click away.

George Valdes

Shared March 25, 2019

Critical reading on the aesthetics of the platform economy

Byron Buckley

Shared August 11, 2016

The homogeneity of these spaces means that traveling between them is frictionless, a value that Silicon Valley prizes.

David Thair

Shared August 4, 2016

This nearly made me choke on my flat white and avocado toast

Anurag Singh

Shared August 4, 2016

Interesting....

Avi A

Shared October 25, 2016

This article transcends past the usual (and legitimate) bashing of the Silicon Valley hive mind, critiquing a design aesthetic invading spaces across the planet. Hard to look at Eames chairs the same again.

Dima Pasko

Shared November 28, 2017

"The new cafe resembles all the other coffee shops Foursquare suggests, whether in Odessa, Beijing, Los Angeles, or Seoul: the same raw wood tables, exposed brick, and hanging Edison bulbs."

Tom Martin

Shared April 22, 2017

a generic space hidden behind a seemingly unique facade.

Le Vrai Connard

Shared July 5, 2018

That's exactly what we were talking about last time we were in that Conscious Hotel in Amsterdam…

Jon Silver

Shared January 1, 2019

airbnb providing the design aesthetic to gentrify the world

Ross Garlick

Shared August 7, 2016

Fantastic critique on the homogenization of the contemporary aesthetic that has arisen in the Instagram generation. I hate to admit it, but I am one of the Airbnb-using, Toby's Estate drinking people who seek and admire authenticity while appreciating convenience and familiarity that need to reflect on what an Airspace lifestyle is actually accomplishing.

Airbnb’s early website design, when it was still called AirBed & Breakfast, was Craigslist-rough and functionalist, promoting shots of hosts or scenery over interior decorating ("better than a cheap hotel," its embedded title text read). By late 2012, it settled into the house-porn format it embraces today, with high-resolution, full-bleed images that could have been pulled from the pages of Dwell. The listings are presented not just as convenient hotel alternatives, but places where users would love to live permanently. The aspirational quality helped the company to blow past predecessors like Couchsurfing.org, which championed the experience of intruding in someone else’s life rather than roleplaying being a local. In a sense, Airbnb became an interactive lifestyle magazine.

Damien Joliot

Shared October 31, 2016

"We could call this strange geography created by technology "AirSpace." It’s the realm of coffee shops, bars, startup offices, and co-live / work spaces that share the same hallmarks everywhere you go: a profusion of symbols of comfort and quality, at least to a certain connoisseurial mindset. Minimalist furniture. Craft beer and avocado toast. Reclaimed wood. Industrial lighting. Cortados. Fast internet. The homogeneity of these spaces means that traveling between them is frictionless."

Will C

Shared October 15, 2016

#airspace

Pallavi Thampi

Shared August 13, 2016

We could call this strange geography created by technology "AirSpace." It’s the realm of coffee shops, bars, startup offices, and co-live / work spaces that share the same hallmarks everywhere you go: a profusion of symbols of comfort and quality, at least to a certain connoisseurial mindset. Minimalist furniture. Craft beer and avocado toast. Reclaimed wood. Industrial lighting. Cortados. Fast internet. The homogeneity of these spaces means that traveling between them is frictionless, a value that Silicon Valley prizes and cultural influencers like Schwarzmann take advantage of. Changing places can be as painless as reloading a website. You might not even realize you’re not where you started.

Carolina Motta

Shared April 2, 2019

The context has no context

Vitor Capela

Shared August 4, 2016

I've been thinking about this a lot as I see my friends, a lot of them only now leaving their parents' homes, converge into the same idea of what's tasteful.

Leandro Ribeiro

Shared August 11, 2016

But over the past few years, something strange has happened. "Every coffee place looks the same," Schwarzmann says. The new cafe resembles all the other coffee shops Foursquare suggests, whether in Odessa, Beijing, Los Angeles, or Seoul: the same raw wood tables, exposed brick, and hanging Edison bulbs.

Ezra

Shared October 19, 2016

Just like Louis CK said: "You never feel completely sad or completely happy, you just feel kinda satisfied with your product, and then you die."

Left unchecked, there is a kind of nightmare version of AirSpace that could spread room by room, cafe by cafe across the world. It’s already there, if you look for it. There are blank white lofts with subway-tile bathrooms, modular furniture, wall-mounted TVs, high-speed internet, and wide, viewless windows in every city, whether it’s downtown Madrid; Nørrebro, Copenhagen; or Gulou, Beijing. Once you take the place of the people who live there, you can head out to their favorite coffee shops, bars, or workspaces, which will be instantly recognizable because they look just like the apartment that you’re living in. You will probably enjoy it. You might think, ‘This is nice, I am comfortable.’ And then you can move on to the next one, only a click away.

Ravi Kawade

Shared August 24, 2018

Insight into the subtle familiarity versus monotonic design.

michael b

Shared January 3, 2019

Yet AirSpace is now less theory than reality. The interchangeability, ceaseless movement, and symbolic blankness that was once the hallmark of hotels and airports, qualities that led the French anthropologist Marc Augé to define them in 1992 as "non-places," has leaked into the rest of life.

Geanette Foster

Shared August 9, 2016

You either belong to the AirSpace class or you don’t.

Jimmy Shaw

Shared August 9, 2016

Very interesting.

Ninjapie Mcpartypants

Shared October 24, 2016

fantastisch verhaal, negeer de saaie titel

nah ngn

Shared November 27, 2017

"personally like the AirSpace style. I can’t say no to a tasteful, clean, modern life space. But thinking through its roots and negative implications makes me reconsider my attachment. It’s hard to identify with something so empty at its core."

Mamdouh Mansour

Shared September 23, 2018

Nice one

Garrett Jones

Shared August 16, 2016

It’s funny how you want these really generic things but also want authenticity, too

Matthew Nunnelley

Shared September 6, 2016

ikea-zation, the latest form of mcdonaldization

Tim Kasper

Shared October 12, 2016

Outstanding.

Paulina Pascual

Shared November 3, 2016

This article is fascinating and well-written. What is happening to #design and #culture?

if you do not fit within its predefined structures as an effective user, you must be doing something wrong

Filip Poscsol

Shared March 20, 2017

"Within the Context of No Context,"

Erwin C

Shared August 1, 2017

Interesting airspace in a space.

Jean-François Fortin

Shared August 5, 2016

Un texte dérangeant qui parlent négativement des médias sociaux... mais sous un angle original : l'uniformisation des décors qui meublent nos vies. Si on peut un peu douter de l'importance qu'on accorde à Airbnb dans l'article (allô Pinterest, Instagram et Facebook), on ne peut que se questionner sur ses propres goûts et s'interroger sur l'impact de ces services dans notre définition de ce qui est beau, de ce qui nous rend heureux.

Tutuwa

Shared August 25, 2016

globalized sameness-as-a-service

Alfredo Sherman

Shared August 25, 2016

Todo es igual.

Digital platforms like Foursquare are producing "a harmonization of tastes" across the world, Schwarzmann says. "It creates you going to the same place all over again."

Badri

Shared October 23, 2016

When you visit places all round the world...and realise that they were all the same

Johnny Poulet

Shared October 27, 2016

De la #sharingeconomy aux non-lieux, une plongée dans l'homogénéisation de nos intérieurs.

Melvie Mar Baylon

Shared October 29, 2016

The Fabric of Cultures: Fashion, Identity, and Globalization

Tero Savioja

Shared January 16, 2017

Good observations analysis on how uniform everything is becoming.

Thierry Menard

Shared April 15, 2017

so true

CreateDutch, Yarn & Crochet Addict

Shared August 10, 2017

I've this some design! Keeps your mind in peace. It is not shouting g at me!

Violeta D

Shared November 28, 2017

Please read this.

Matías Rosenberg

Shared February 28, 2019

The connective emotional grid of social media platforms is what drives the impression of AirSpace. If taste is globalized, then the logical endpoint is a world in which aesthetic diversity decreases. It resembles a kind of gentrification: one that happens concurrently across global urban centers.

Matías Rosenberg

Shared February 28, 2019

to opt for the flawed community bed & breakfast rather than the temporary, immaculate apartment. Seeking out difference is important, particularly when technology makes it so easy to avoid doing so.

Rama Kishore

Shared October 9, 2018

Nice article