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Tom Voûte tom at voute .org

Shared December 27, 2016

Prioritizing your goals

Tom Voûte tom at voute .org

Shared December 27, 2016

Prioritizing goals

Ben Orenstein

Shared May 7, 2017

Everything you didn’t circle just became your Avoid-At-All-Cost list.

Raveesh Bhalla

Shared February 16, 2017

Absolutely love this

Giovanni Lodi

Shared May 15, 2017

It's eliminating things you care about that is difficult. It is hard to prevent using your time on things that are easy to rationalize, but that have little payoff. The tasks that have the greatest likelihood of derailing your progress are the ones you care about, but that aren't truly important.

Kyle Hardgrave

Shared January 6, 2017

Good way to think about priorities

Rakesh Gupta

Shared October 11, 2017

Given his success, it stands to reason that Buffett has an excellent understanding of how to spend his time each day. From a monetary perspective, you could say that he manages his time better than anyone else.

Erika Ocampo

Shared January 6, 2017

the simple 3-step productivity strategy that Warren Buffett uses to help his employees determine their priorities and actions.

Erika Ocampo

Shared January 6, 2017

Step 1:

write down his top 25 career goals.

Erika Ocampo

Shared January 6, 2017

Step 2:

circle his top 5 goals.

Erika Ocampo

Shared January 6, 2017

Step 3:

Everything you didn’t circle just became your Avoid-At-All-Cost list. No matter what, these things get no attention from you until you’ve succeeded with your top 5

Erika Ocampo

Shared January 6, 2017

Power of elimination

eliminating the inessential is one of the best ways to make life easier

Erdogan Cesmeli

Shared December 18, 2016

Worth trying. I always admired the ability of saying NO.

Pito Salas

Shared May 6, 2017

Pretty good perspective

Mr. Thoro

Shared April 11, 2017

I've made some life changes recently. If you haven't heard back from me, you might be one of them.

Suhit Anantula

Shared February 12, 2017

This is why Buffett's strategy is particularly brilliant. Items 6 through 25 on your list are things you care about. They are important to you. It is very easy to justify spending your time on them. But when you compare them to your top 5 goals, these items are distractions. Spending time on secondary priorities is the reason you have 20 half-finished projects instead of 5 completed ones.

Suhit Anantula

Shared February 18, 2017

Flint replied, “Well, the top 5 are my primary focus, but the other 20 come in a close second. They are still important so I’ll work on those intermittently as I see fit. They are not as urgent, but I still plan to give them a dedicated effort.”

To which Buffett replied, “No. You’ve got it wrong, Mike. Everything you didn’t circle just became your Avoid-At-All-Cost list. No matter what, these things get no attention from you until you’ve succeeded with your top 5

Nicolas Rivard

Shared January 6, 2017

Loved this 🤓

Ingvi Þór Georgsson

Shared March 19, 2017

Brilliant idea but somehow sceptical about the scenario. Buffets name most likely hijacked for clicks and greater storytelling. Good though.

Jozef Brenkus

Shared January 2, 2017

Flint replied, “Well, the top 5 are my primary focus, but the other 20 come in a close second. They are still important so I’ll work on those intermittently as I see fit. They are not as urgent, but I still plan to give them a dedicated effort.”

To which Buffett replied, “No. You’ve got it wrong, Mike. Everything you didn’t circle just became your Avoid-At-All-Cost list. No matter what, these things get no attention from you until you’ve succeeded with your top 5.”

Albert A. Legori

Shared March 19, 2017

Try this to find some direction. :)

Edgard Leal

Shared April 3, 2017

Cleanup consists in eliminate the waste

Brian Fang

Shared July 19, 2017

"Eliminate ruthlessly. Force yourself to focus."

Eliminate ruthlessly. Force yourself to focus.

Bernie

Shared December 26, 2016

Wow

Clive Richards

Shared January 26, 2017

Parallels with Agile practises

Fabian Acuña

Shared February 28, 2017

completa una tarea o elimínala de tu lista

Ramesh Lakshminarasimhan

Shared February 28, 2017

If you want to become more productive, go minimal!

Maurício Rocha

Shared March 3, 2017

Bora focar e fazer!

Craig Key

Shared March 6, 2017

Note to self: THIS!!!

Arunjay Katakam

Shared March 13, 2017

Interesting and simple concept

Marzio Massari

Shared May 25, 2017

The Power of Elimination

The Power of Elimination

Joe McLain

Shared July 4, 2017

must...get...rid of...unessential!

brian Masamvu

Shared August 6, 2017

Brian masamvu YouTube channel please follow my videos

Jack Dillé

Shared September 21, 2017

This seems like a powerful yet difficult strategy.

Scott Murphy

Shared November 6, 2017

Great eye opener here! short 2 minute read.

pablo morales marchan

Shared November 11, 2017

Transform

Russell Mclean

Shared December 30, 2016

Genius.

Srg Kas

Shared January 5, 2017

The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don’t love you back.

Ricardo A. Glez. Gazapo

Shared January 6, 2017

Great from first to the last line, especially the last.

Rolf Helle Mathiesen

Shared January 14, 2017

Mye å hente her.

Flavio Fontes

Shared January 31, 2017

Simplicidade que vale ouro.

Toby Downton

Shared March 19, 2017

Brilliantly simple!

Michael Schefer

Shared April 6, 2017

Eliminate ruthlessly. Force yourself to focus. Complete a task or kill it.

The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don't love you back.1

Johnatan VasSan

Shared May 27, 2017

Claves de control del enfoque de áreas importantes (para cada persona)

Tengku Hariz

Shared June 11, 2017

uuu

Habits

Kunal Gupta

Shared September 9, 2017

Power of elimination!

Eric Wee

Shared September 17, 2017

Remove the extra, keep the need. Be essentialist.

秦始皇 嬴政

Shared October 31, 2017

沾酒不醉是喝的少,見色不迷是摸不着;
以德服人是打不過,淡泊名利是沒辦法.

Denise Brazil

Shared July 21, 2016

Every

Felix Haus

Shared September 14, 2016

The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don’t love you back.

Ravin K

Shared December 24, 2016

Contact

Nathan Gross

Shared December 29, 2016

Focus and reduce distractions.

Dinesh Agarwal

Shared January 10, 2017

The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don’t love you back.

Daniel Joubert

Shared January 13, 2017

Thought provoking... 💭

Daniel Joubert

Shared January 13, 2017

'5 completed goals are better than 20 half finished/incomplete goals.' 👏

Baba Baba

Shared January 22, 2017

I believe in minimalism and simplicity. I like getting rid of waste. I think that eliminating the inessential is one of the best ways to make life easier, make good habits more automatic, and make you grateful for what you do have.

Smridhi Grover

Shared January 24, 2017

minimal work maximum result

PjotBekks

Shared February 6, 2017

By eliminating the inessential:
1. Top 25 Goals
2. Circle Top 5 Goals Again
3. Execute Top 5 Goals, Ignore the Rest
// Action > Distration
- 4 Minutes -

Karthikkeyan Balaji

Shared February 13, 2017

Must read!!!

Farida Purnaminingrum

Shared February 14, 2017

great article, especially for full time mom with a lot of task list.

Janette Lindner

Shared February 18, 2017

simple approach that resonates with me

Tyler Brooks

Shared February 22, 2017

Pretty simple but powerful advice about getting things done.

Nibin Reny

Shared March 8, 2017

Nice

Abhishek Bhoyar

Shared March 17, 2017

nice

Gina Hall

Shared March 22, 2017

I live by lists!! Love this excellent article to learn how to prioritize and focus on completing your goals!! I'm also intrigued by the idea of eliminating ruthlessly, force yourself to focus, complete a task or kill it.

Robina Qureshi

Shared April 11, 2017

Test

DJ venus

Shared April 16, 2017

i ♥️ Mr. Buffett .

Viv Ilo Veith

Shared April 25, 2017

Great article!

Sachin Pradhan

Shared May 1, 2017

JAMES CLEAR
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Warren Buffett’s “2 List” Strategy: How to Maximize Your Focus and Master Your Priorities
By James Clear    |    Decision Making, Focus, Minimalism, Productivity
With well over 50 billion dollars to his name, Warren Buffett is consistently ranked among the wealthiest people in the world. Out of all the investors in the 20th century, Buffett was the most successful.

Given his success, it stands to reason that Buffett has an excellent understanding of how to spend his time each day. From a monetary perspective, you could say that he manages his time better than anyone else.

And that's why the story below, which was shared directly from Buffett's employee to my good friend Scott Dinsmore, caught my attention.

Let's talk about the simple 3-step productivity strategy that Warren Buffett uses to help his employees determine their priorities and actions.

Before we talk about how to get started, I wanted to let you know I researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to good habits and stop procrastinating. Want to check out my insights? Download my free PDF guide “Transform Your Habits” here.

The Story of Mike Flint
Mike Flint was Buffett's personal airplane pilot for 10 years. (Flint has also flown four US Presidents, so I think we can safely say he is good at his job.) According to Flint, he was talking about his career priorities with Buffett when his boss asked the pilot to go through a 3-step exercise.

Here's how it works…

STEP 1: Buffett started by asking Flint to write down his top 25 career goals. So, Flint took some time and wrote them down. (Note: you could also complete this exercise with goals for a shorter timeline. For example, write down the top 25 things you want to accomplish this week.)

STEP 2: Then, Buffett asked Flint to review his list and circle his top 5 goals. Again, Flint took some time, made his way through the list, and eventually decided on his 5 most important goals.

Note: If you're following along at home, pause right now and do these first two steps before moving on to Step 3.

STEP 3: At this point, Flint had two lists. The 5 items he had circled were List A and the 20 items he had not circled were List B.

Flint confirmed that he would start working on his top 5 goals right away. And that's when Buffett asked him about the second list, “And what about the ones you didn't circle?”

Flint replied, “Well, the top 5 are my primary focus, but the other 20 come in a close second. They are still important so I’ll work on those intermittently as I see fit. They are not as urgent, but I still plan to give them a dedicated effort.”

To which Buffett replied, “No. You’ve got it wrong, Mike. Everything you didn’t circle just became your Avoid-At-All-Cost list. No matter what, these things get no attention from you until you’ve succeeded with your top 5.”

The Power of Elimination
I believe in minimalism and simplicity. I like getting rid of waste. I think that eliminating the inessential is one of the best ways to make life easier, make good habits more automatic, and make you grateful for what you do have.

That said, getting rid of wasteful items and decisions is relatively easy. It's eliminating things you care about that is difficult. It is hard to prevent using your time on things that are easy to rationalize, but that have little payoff. The tasks that have the greatest likelihood of derailing your progress are the ones you care about, but that aren't truly important.

Every behavior has a cost. Even neutral behaviors aren’t really neutral. They take up time, energy, and space that could be put toward better behaviors or more important tasks. We are often spinning in motion instead of taking action.

This is why Buffett's strategy is particularly brilliant. Items 6 through 25 on your list are things you care about. They are important to you. It is very easy to justify spending your time on them. But when you compare them to your top 5 goals, these items are distractions. Spending time on secondary priorities is the reason you have 20 half-finished projects instead of 5 completed ones.

Eliminate ruthlessly. Force yourself to focus. Complete a task or kill it.

The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don't love you back.

Gauthier Menin

Shared May 17, 2017

Interesting thoughts.

LîVë ÂwëSômĒ

Shared June 6, 2017

awesome...✌️

Morgan Freedom

Shared July 5, 2017

very interresting process of work.

Abigail Augustine

Shared July 8, 2017

Eliminate ruthlessly. Force yourself to focus. Complete a task or kill it.

The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don't love you back.1

Artem Barsukov

Shared July 22, 2017

No. You’ve got it wrong, Mike. Everything you didn’t circle just became your Avoid-At-All-Cost list

Artem Barsukov

Shared July 22, 2017

Spending time on secondary priorities is the reason you have 20 half-finished projects instead of 5 completed ones.

Eliminate ruthlessly. Force yourself to focus. Complete a task or kill it.

The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don't love you back.

Jason Bagley

Shared July 25, 2017

Good stuff.

Kathy Ellen Davis

Shared August 21, 2017

Thought this was a great way to get clear on priorities and projects!

John Trent

Shared August 26, 2017

This is really great advice 😀

R T

Shared September 21, 2017

Good one

Silvia Salinas Espino

Shared October 2, 2017

ok

Van Sui Thawng

Shared October 2, 2017

Good article.

Mike Barbour

Shared October 7, 2017

“The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don't love you back.”

The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don't love you back.

Olli Tiainen

Shared October 8, 2017

Focus on your top 5 goals & ruthlessly avoid the rest (e.g. top 6-20).

pankaj purohit

Shared October 9, 2017

Buffett

Vaijnath Rode

Shared October 13, 2017

Have a look. Good Short Read

Thomas Baldwin

Shared October 22, 2017

Interesting

Huda Ardo

Shared November 10, 2017

Pesan om warren

Perla Hernandez

Shared 3 dias atrás

You might

Björn Tegelund

Shared 2 dias atrás

“No. You’ve got it wrong, Mike. Everything you didn’t circle just became your Avoid-At-All-Cost list. No matter what, these things get no attention from you until you’ve succeeded with your top 5.”

Judy Nelson

Shared March 10, 2017

This is such a powerful article about maximizing focus. To do what Buffett suggests would take willpower beyond description for many, but to not follow his advice means ongoing mental chaos and frenzy!

Benoit BUAUD

Shared March 24, 2017

Test

here

Benoit BUAUD

Shared March 26, 2017

Test