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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Nicole Leffel

Shared March 2, 2016

So one of the first things I said was let’s not pretend we can just try things and some will work out and some won’t. That’s not winning, that’s losing.”

Jeremy Cabral

Shared January 1, 2017

We follow a 60-day planning cycle inspired by the planning process 'Mastering he Rockefeller Habits' by Verne Harnish at finder. Really keen on incorporating engineering time into our planning process in 2017 the way Pandora have

Oz Lubling

Shared April 1, 2017

When it went public in 2011, over a decade after the company’s founding, Pandora employed fewer than 40 engineers. With this skeleton crew, the company built products for 70 million monthly users on the web, iOS, Android, Windows Phone, a thousand consumer electronic devices, and in over 100 types of cars. It also generated half a billion in revenue — laying the groundwork for its $7 billion valuation today.

Sar Haribhakti

Shared August 4, 2016

Wow.

Alexis Tryon

Shared December 16, 2015

Love this system. What would we be stupid not to do in the next 90 days?

Луцык Вадим

Shared July 24, 2017

ksksj

Norbert Fernandes

Shared January 5, 2017

Compared to Twitter and Facebook, with their armies of engineers, Pandora is one of those rare Hail Mary success stories that keeps entrepreneurs and investors betting on long-shots. From day one, it pushed against constraints that these other companies didn’t have. Namely, the fact that it had to hand a huge chunk of its funding over to the music industry, leaving it with a scrappy budget that forces companies to stay lean and get creative.

That’s how the Pandora prioritization process was born.

Tim Metz

Shared March 23, 2017

Awesome #product development #prioritization system from Pandora. #startups

Tucker Schreiber

Shared April 11, 2017

“There’s this motto in our industry that says fail fast and fail often,” he says. “But none of us can actually do that right? We have all kinds of constituents — employees, investors, users — they are expecting you to do smart things, not dumb things. So one of the first things I said was let’s not pretend we can just try things and some will work out and some won’t. That’s not winning, that’s losing.”

Tucker Schreiber

Shared April 11, 2017

“A week from now, you’ll be smarter about everything — about what your users want, how to monetize it, the expectations of your investors,” Conrad says. “You absolutely can’t commit to long-term roadmaps. A lot of people will ask you for one, and they have good reasons — people who have given you money, advisors, employees, potential employees. But you have to tell them you’re not going to answer their questions. The more you talk about what you’re going to do a year from now, the more that becomes etched in stone. You have to make sure you’re doing the most valuable work at any given time.”

Craig Bailey

Shared January 4, 2017

He readily busts the myth of “failing fast.” This wasn’t the environment at Pandora, with little time and money to waste. “There’s this motto in our industry that says fail fast and fail often,” he says. “But none of us can actually do that right? We have all kinds of constituents — employees, investors, users — they are expecting you to do smart things, not dumb things. So one of the first things I said was let’s not pretend we can just try things and some will work out and some won’t. That’s not winning, that’s losing.”

Arlo Jamrog

Shared February 11, 2017

“There’s this motto in our industry that says fail fast and fail often,” he says. “But none of us can actually do that right? We have all kinds of constituents — employees, investors, users — they are expecting you to do smart things, not dumb things.

Jaana Metsamaa

Shared February 4, 2017

🙌🏻

Justin Hancock

Shared February 25, 2017

"there's a question you have to ask yourself at the start of every quarter:

What would be stupid for us not to do in the next 90 days?"

Bobby Stemper

Shared April 20, 2017

You have to make sure you’re doing the most valuable work at any given time.”

Federico Arce-Teran

Shared March 3, 2017

worthy of stealing...

As As

Shared April 2, 2017

A great system to implement at your startup if you have limited resources but a big user Base

Pandora Prioritization System

Chris Frost

Shared November 9, 2016

I wouldn't implement this exact process myself for a bunch of reasons (not least seriously ropey effort estimation) but the themes on shortness of roadmap and forcing prioritisation are interesting and could be applied in different ways

zvika guy

Shared January 18, 2017

Nice technique. Yet, when throwing in the non-dev efforts that involves in shipping new feature, this becomes much more complicated.

Sue Braiden

Shared May 6, 2017

All kinds of smart! This turns several popular business/startup philosophies on their head, and puts a handful of simple systems in place to be agile and profitable, fast. Love articles in plain-speak. Love them even more when they hand you the roadmap, proof of concept and the darned keys.

https://getpocket.com/a/read/857405696

Sue Braiden

Shared May 6, 2017

All kinds of smart! This turns several popular business/startup philosophies on their head, and puts a handful of simple systems in place to be agile and profitable, fast. Love articles in plain-speak. Love them even more when they hand you the roadmap, proof of concept and the darned keys.

Norbert Scully

Shared June 28, 2017

“A week from now, you’ll be smarter about everything — about what your users want, how to monetize it, the expectations of your investors,” Conrad says. “You absolutely can’t commit to long-term roadmaps. A lot of people will ask you for one, and they have good reasons — people who have given you money, advisors, employees, potential employees. But you have to tell them you’re not going to answer their questions. The more you talk about what you’re going to do a year from now, the more that becomes etched in stone. You have to make sure you’re doing the most valuable work at any given time.”

Sandra Almeida

Shared July 13, 2017

"Every single day, we had to do the work that would matter most, and we couldn't afford to make big mistakes."

lsaffie Saffie

Shared December 18, 2016

Before every quarter starts, pose the question: “What would be stupid not to do in the next 90 days?”

Mindy Drees

Shared January 1, 2017

this is a valuable tip.

. How do you go from 80 ideas to a reasonable number of features that less than 40 engineers could build in 90 days?

It started with making one presentation slide for each idea. Each slide would have a heading and several bullet points defining the scope of the feature and metrics describing what success would look like and how it would impact the business. That’s all people got to make their case. And given the speed of the whole process, there was little time for precision.

Mohan Rao

Shared January 21, 2017

A very interesting approach to prioritization. Handing out fake bills to bid on features is interesting and worth trying.

Chris Rivard

Shared February 24, 2017

He readily busts the myth of “failing fast.” This wasn’t the environment at Pandora, with little time and money to waste. “There’s this motto in our industry that says fail fast and fail often,” he says. “But none of us can actually do that right? We have all kinds of constituents — employees, investors, users — they are expecting you to do smart things, not dumb things. So one of the first things I said was let’s not pretend we can just try things and some will work out and some won’t. That’s not winning, that’s losing.”

Chris Rivard

Shared February 24, 2017

It started with making one presentation slide for each idea. Each slide would have a heading and several bullet points defining the scope of the feature and metrics describing what success would look like and how it would impact the business. That’s all people got to make their case. And given the speed of the whole process, there was little time for precision.

Chris Rivard

Shared February 24, 2017

Taking his example, if you have five people participating in the prioritization process and $150 in engineering capacity, you would make five stacks of stickies, each worth $5. Everyone gets six so they have $30 to “spend” on features. It’s important everyone gets the same amount whether they’re the CEO or customer service.

Felipe De Castro Cruz

Shared March 1, 2017

You have to make sure you’re doing the most valuable work at any given time

Vincent Zhang

Shared March 7, 2017

I like it.

Tim Hall

Shared March 8, 2017

Interesting take on "fail fast" mantra.

Jean Tu

Shared March 11, 2017

That's just insane how they're able to do it with such a small team!

Rose Phoenix

Shared March 20, 2017

interesting concept.

Michele Vadora

Shared June 15, 2017

So one of the first things I said was let’s not pretend we can just try things and some will work out and some won’t. That’s not winning, that’s losing.

Michele Vadora

Shared June 15, 2017

Every 90 Days

90 days is the length of one quarter. That’s how far you can reasonably think and plan ahead when you’re in hyper-growth, Conrad says. And there's a question you have to ask yourself at the start of every quarter:

What would be stupid for us not to do in the next 90 days?

David Karter

Shared

Hello

Derek Potter

Shared February 6, 2017

An interesting read

Pat Brady

Shared 4 days ago

Leadership innovation includes process innovation that rejects conventional norms #leadership