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Recommendations from Pocket Users

David Chartier

Shared March 21, 2018

What an interesting idea.

Guillaume VENDÉ

Shared March 18, 2017

Hey ! Je recommande un article intéressant par jour sur http://getpocket.com/@GuillaumeVende ! Voici celui du jour !

Karthik Margabandu

Shared January 8, 2017

Wow! Living life like a surfer - a brilliant analogy. Good read

Robert Straus

Shared January 13, 2017

The Unexpected Antidote to Procrastion - Make Yourself Uncomfortable! You'll grow! #selfawareness #hbr

Nikolay Syusko

Shared February 22, 2017

Какое внимательное замечание! Мне знаком страх "отказа". Я знакомился с девушкой вживую только однажды. По иронии судьбы после пришлось работать "продажником", где новые знакомства - норма.

А что, если действительно признать падения-отказы такой же нормой жизни, как и успех?! Ведь без одного другого не бывает.

Liv Simmons

Shared January 1, 2017

Whoa my god.

Liv Simmons

Shared March 24, 2018

Right! What makes an “unpleasant” feeling unpleasant? If we didn’t label the feeling maybe we wouldn’t be so scared to feel it.

Brian Schnack

Shared February 6, 2017

Get out there and do the uncomfortable

Soon, you won’t fear feeling. You’ll pursue it like those courageous early morning surfers

Dom Delimar

Shared November 18, 2017

Here’s the thing: More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time. We feel the suffering of procrastination, or the frustration of a stuck relationship. I know partnerships that drag along painfully for years because no one is willing to speak about the elephant in the room. Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But how?

Kevin Correnti

Shared December 28, 2017

Surfing analogy. Afraid of failure because of the feelings that we will encounter

Jochen Breuer

Shared February 10, 2017

In the end we all fall.

Kavit Haria

Shared February 25, 2017

What if we all lived life like a surfer on a wave?

Godiva Golding

Shared January 17, 2018

This was quite pleasant. (4/5)

Loved the surfing analogy.
Endlessly avoiding the discomfort that may come with the things we procrastinate on-perfectly relatable

Fern Lim

Shared April 7, 2017

Feel and experience instead of avoiding!

Fern Lim

Shared April 7, 2017

Feel and experience instead of avoiding!

William Green

Shared March 28, 2017

Seeking out the boundaries in your thinking.

Khairi Muhammad

Shared November 19, 2017

This article really related to me. I know it's not easy to change, but I know it's possible.

Be better.

#BalikBelajar :D

Cielo Fortich

Shared March 25, 2018

Short and motivating read.

Richard Shahi

Shared January 7, 2017

Fizzle or failure, you end up in the water.

But here’s what I found most interesting: The only difference between a failure and a fizzle was the element of surprise. In all cases, the surfer ends up in the water. There’s no other possible way to wrap up a ride.

Lawrence, John Girot

Shared May 16, 2017

Because we’re afraid of feeling

Ana Pereira

Shared March 14, 2017

Have fun failing? :-)

Omar Rayward

Shared August 21, 2017

Let's all be surfers

Leszek Bartkowski

Shared May 30, 2018

Soon, you won’t fear feeling. You’ll pursue it like those courageous early morning surfers. You’ll wake up before dawn and dive into those scary conversations and difficult proposals. You’ll take the risks that once scared you. And you’ll fall; sometimes you’ll even fail.

Shannon Low

Shared December 18, 2016

Surfing, apparently.

Mark Coates

Shared January 16, 2017

Live like a surfer—catch a wave and ride it all the way, fall into the water, get back up on the board, paddle to the next wave and do it all again.

Javier Villalba

Shared March 2, 2017

"Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate."

Natascha Symanski

Shared March 3, 2017

Loved it

Gabriel Hamdan

Shared July 28, 2017

penso e procuro viver assim... pessoalmente e comercialmente ;)

Sofia Adap

Shared February 16, 2018

Blew my mind!

Cristina Bugarin

Shared August 6, 2018

So why don’t we live life that way? Why don’t we accept falling — even if it’s a failure — as part of the ride?

Because we’re afraid of feeling.

Ebrahim Khalil Amid

Shared April 26, 2018

feel it all. Feel the anticipation of the risk. Feel the pre-risk cringe. Then, during the risk, and after, take a deep breath and feel that too.

You’ll become familiar with those feelings and, believe it or not, you’ll start to enjoy them. Even the ones you think of as unpleasant. Because feeling is what tells you you’re alive.

Rose Barroga

Shared February 8, 2017

Love.

Leslie McIntire

Shared February 15, 2017

I find myself avoiding unpleasant conversations with my manager. This column made me rethink my approach to those difficult conversations.

Yuvika Bader

Shared June 18, 2017

Take a risk

Andreas Batsis

Shared August 13, 2017

No matter how strange it sounds, IT IS THAT SIMPLE!

Lars Karlsson

Shared October 1, 2017

Att leva som surfare, att det är oundvikligt att falla av brädan, är en klok insikt.

Srinivasan Rajappa

Shared October 19, 2017

This is promising :) protecting the skin of your body ends up you becoming fragile.

Gaurav Jalan

Shared December 2, 2017

How you

maekyo io

Shared April 13, 2018

i am a major procrastinator

Tausif Ayman Ayman

Shared August 4, 2018

Soon, you won’t fear feeling. You’ll pursue it like those courageous early morning surfers. You’ll wake up before dawn and dive into those scary conversations and difficult proposals. You’ll take the risks that once scared you. And you’ll fall; sometimes you’ll even fail.

Then you’ll get up and do it again.

Douglas Reyes

Shared February 7, 2017

Wow!

Stephen Adams

Shared July 27, 2018

Some interesting thoughts on procrastination

Chad Bohac

Shared February 10, 2017

Good article! Only takes a few minutes!

Martin Merrigold

Shared March 6, 2017

Surf's up!

"Here’s the thing: More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time."

Devin Parker

Shared January 3, 2017

I love the comparison

Tracy Chau

Shared February 3, 2017

And feel it all. Feel the anticipation of the risk. Feel the pre-risk cringe. Then, during the risk, and after, take a deep breath and feel that too.

Greg Sweatt

Shared February 13, 2017

Fear of failure, or the unknown, prevents so many from taking action.

halle✧.°

Shared February 16, 2017

So why don’t we live life that way? Why don’t we accept falling — even if it’s a failure — as part of the ride?

Because we’re afraid of feeling.

Saleh Alqaryan

Shared February 24, 2017

The only reason you procrastinate is because you're afraid of your feelings. I can't agree more.

Ludek Slegr

Shared March 1, 2017

Very good description of us trying to avoid something potentially unpleasant. That often does not even happen.

88 pocket2013

Shared March 3, 2017

Have that difficult conversation. Listen without defensiveness when your colleague criticizes you. Name the elephant in the room. Get rejected.

Crystal D'souza

Shared March 4, 2017

Get up and do it again.
Feeling = being alive

Micah Proffer

Shared June 29, 2017

You gon' learn today!

Claudia Cojocaru

Shared August 24, 2017

A short article about fear of feelings...

Pedro Falcão Costa

Shared November 22, 2017

So true...

AlchemyLeads UX & Design

Shared February 8, 2018

#mindfulness & #productivityhacks @seanchaudhary

Stephen Norris

Shared February 25, 2018

If you’ve ever seen the film YES man then you’ll understand Peter Bregman of HBR.org view on just saying yes as an antidote to procrastination. This is a great read for anyone needing that extra push in stepping up a gear and getting things done!

Etienne Servant

Shared June 3, 2018

“What if we all lived life like a surfer on a wave?”

John Studdard

Shared December 20, 2016

A perfect analogy on how to overcome Procrastination

Annie Carson

Shared February 7, 2017

Failure is an option.

Here’s the thing: More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time. We feel the suffering of procrastination, or the frustration of a stuck relationship. I know partnerships that drag along painfully for years because no one is willing to speak about the elephant in the room. Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But how?

Practice.

Roger Brunswick

Shared February 7, 2017

another random article....

Rami Alloush

Shared February 9, 2017

Loved it

Jen Snell

Shared January 10, 2018

great article.

Marcin Waśko

Shared May 16, 2018

Jakbyś chciał poszukac jescze inspiracji przed jutrzejszą mową :)

Khalid Sarfaraz

Shared March 20, 2017

You need need to have the feeling of failure.

Juliana

Shared August 19, 2017

Procrastination is most of the time avoidance of a unpleasant feelings. Avoidance just prolongs those feelings and causes more stress and perhaps make things even more difficult and unbarrible for not completing a task.

Kayla Brown

Shared September 15, 2017

Here’s the thing: More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time. We feel the suffering of procrastination, or the frustration of a stuck relationship. I know partnerships that drag along painfully for years because no one is willing to speak about the elephant in the room. Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But how?

Vijay Jadeja

Shared January 8, 2018

it makes sense

Venkatesh Madihalli

Shared February 15, 2016

Seems a practical and sensible idea !

Bijay Gurung

Shared March 1, 2016

Accept the outcome instead of dreading it.

Clio Loughran

Shared January 1, 2017

💥

David Plúa

Shared December 29, 2016

https://hbr.org/2013/05/the-unexpected-antidote-to-pro

amir shah

Shared December 31, 2016

That got me thinking: What if we all lived life like a surfer on a wave?

The answer that kept coming to me was that we would take more risks.

That difficult conversation with your boss (or employee, or colleague, or partner, or spouse) that you’ve been avoiding? You’d initiate it.

Matt Rider

Shared December 31, 2016

Live like surfers shred

Chinenye Agwu

Shared January 5, 2017

Amazing piece-- very inspiring.

Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But

Chinenye Agwu

Shared January 5, 2017

Amazing piece-- Very inspiring.

Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But how?

Chinenye Agwu

Shared January 5, 2017

Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate.

Karen Dellatan

Shared January 10, 2017

Wow. I'll stop procrastinating na. 😊

Sean Trinidad

Shared February 1, 2017

What if we all lived life like a surfer on a wave?

Cheri Orsi

Shared February 12, 2017

"More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time.". ... the truth about procrastinating.

Alisa Igorevna Kondrashova

Shared February 13, 2017

Useful!

Reis pocket

Shared March 15, 2017

"A recent early morning hike in Malibu, California, led me to a beach, where I sat on a rock and watched surfers. I marveled at these courageous men and women who woke before dawn, endured freezing water, paddled through barreling waves, and even risked shark attacks, all for the sake of, maybe, catching an epic ride.

After about 15 minutes, it was easy to tell the surfers apart by their style of surfing, their handling of the board, their skill, and their playfulness.

What really struck me though, was what they had in common. No matter how good, how experienced, how graceful they were on the wave, every surfer ended their ride in precisely the same way: By falling.

Some had fun with their fall, while others tried desperately to avoid it. And not all falls were failures — some fell into the water only when their wave fizzled and their ride ended.

But here’s what I found most interesting: The only difference between a failure and a fizzle was the element of surprise. In all cases, the surfer ends up in the water. There’s no other possible way to wrap up a ride.

That got me thinking: What if we all lived life like a surfer on a wave?

The answer that kept coming to me was that we would take more risks.

That difficult conversation with your boss (or employee, or colleague, or partner, or spouse) that you’ve been avoiding? You’d initiate it.

That proposal (or article, or book, or email) you’ve been putting off? You’d start it.

That new business (or product, or sales strategy, or investment) you’ve been overanalyzing? You’d follow through.

And when you fell — because if you take risks, you will fall — you’d get back on the board and paddle back into the surf. That’s what every single one of the surfers did.

So why don’t we live life that way? Why don’t we accept falling — even if it’s a failure — as part of the ride?

Because we’re afraid of feeling."

Forest Fire

Shared April 1, 2017

"And feel it all. Feel the anticipation of the risk. Feel the pre-risk cringe. Then, during the risk, and after, take a deep breath and feel that too."

Franco Gilio

Shared April 1, 2017

"Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate"

Vanessa Sebben

Shared April 12, 2017

Amazing article!

Jacob Mongold

Shared May 27, 2017

I really like this article. It brings out a lot of problems that seem so simple but are hard to overcome.

Abhilash Goudu

Shared June 15, 2017

Interesting perspective

Stephen Kim

Shared July 23, 2017

e

Zahraa Azeem

Shared August 4, 2017

excellent article. It encouraged me to move ahead and do what I was avoiding all the time.

Phuong Dang

Shared August 7, 2017

Because feeling is what tells you you’re alive.

Nate Morse

Shared October 15, 2017

The fear of failing is usually worse than failing. so quit procrastinating and do that thing you want to do.

Deep Basnet

Shared October 31, 2017

will do this.

Emily Siu

Shared November 11, 2017

More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time.

Noel Jacob

Shared November 8, 2017

Just Do It ! Ha...Ha...

You’ll pursue it like those courageous early morning surfers. You’ll wake up before dawn and dive into those scary conversations and difficult proposals. You’ll take the risks that once scared you. And you’ll fall; sometimes you’ll even fail.

Then you’ll get up and do it again.

Babette Grolman-Conalty

Shared November 15, 2017

An interesting & uplifting article!

Lucas Varese

Shared November 26, 2017

More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time.

Hannah Williamson

Shared December 5, 2017

I really needed this to be honest. Hopefully it can help some other people too!

Siewfan Wong

Shared December 8, 2017

Feel the feeling, lest it leaves a shadow

Javier Llinares

Shared December 17, 2017

dice algo sobre las mujeres

women who woke before

Ramón Patiño

Shared December 24, 2017

Because feeling is what tells you you’re alive.

Rajat Patra

Shared January 18, 2018

nice

Claudio Fojanesi

Shared January 28, 2018

keep

Tracy Chau

Shared February 17, 2018

Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But how?

Practice.

Which you get by taking risks, feeling whatever you end up feeling, recognizing that it didn’t kill you, and then getting on the board and paddling back into the surf.

Here’s the thing: More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time.

Gabriella Cyrillo

Shared February 20, 2018

Como eu adoro este artigo 💚♻️🔄

Paula Glickstein

Shared March 12, 2018

I am not saying you procrastinate; that isn't really what this is about. It's more about what you already seem to do - deal with your feelings by being direct and honest. I admire that in you and love you!

Jenova Arsua

Shared March 20, 2018

Soon, you won’t fear feeling. You’ll pursue it like those courageous early morning surfers. You’ll wake up before dawn and dive into those scary conversations and difficult proposals. You’ll take the risks that once scared you. And you’ll fall; sometimes you’ll even fail.

Then you’ll get up and do it again.

Weslie Villejo

Shared March 22, 2018

So why don’t we live life that way? Why don’t we accept falling — even if it’s a failure — as part of the ride?

Weslie Villejo

Shared March 22, 2018

Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate.

Fiach McHugh

Shared April 8, 2018

Soon, you won’t fear feeling. You’ll pursue it like those courageous early morning surfers. You’ll wake up before dawn and dive into those scary conversations and difficult proposals. You’ll take the risks that once scared you. And you’ll fall; sometimes you’ll even fail.

Then you’ll get up and do it again.

April C.

Shared April 27, 2018

Courageous

Robert Glowacz

Shared May 15, 2018

Test

and even risked shark attacks, all for the sake of, maybe, catching an epic ride.

After about 15 minutes, it was easy to tell the surfers apart by their style of surfing, their handling of the board, their skill

Mojko .

Shared May 18, 2018



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WHAT TO READ NEXT

How to Make Yourself Work When You Just Don’t Want To

MANAGING YOURSELF
The Unexpected Antidote to Procrastination
Peter Bregman
MAY 10, 2013
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A recent early morning hike in Malibu, California, led me to a beach, where I sat on a rock and watched surfers. I marveled at these courageous men and women who woke before dawn, endured freezing water, paddled through barreling waves, and even risked shark attacks, all for the sake of, maybe, catching an epic ride.

After about 15 minutes, it was easy to tell the surfers apart by their style of surfing, their handling of the board, their skill, and their playfulness.

What really struck me though, was what they had in common. No matter how good, how experienced, how graceful they were on the wave, every surfer ended their ride in precisely the same way: By falling.

Some had fun with their fall, while others tried desperately to avoid it. And not all falls were failures — some fell into the water only when their wave fizzled and their ride ended.

But here’s what I found most interesting: The only difference between a failure and a fizzle was the element of surprise. In all cases, the surfer ends up in the water. There’s no other possible way to wrap up a ride.

That got me thinking: What if we all lived life like a surfer on a wave?

The answer that kept coming to me was that we would take more risks.

That difficult conversation with your boss (or employee, or colleague, or partner, or spouse) that you’ve been avoiding? You’d initiate it.

That proposal (or article, or book, or email) you’ve been putting off? You’d start it.

That new business (or product, or sales strategy, or investment) you’ve been overanalyzing? You’d follow through.

And when you fell — because if you take risks, you will fall — you’d get back on the board and paddle back into the surf. That’s what every single one of the surfers did.

So why don’t we live life that way? Why don’t we accept falling — even if it’s a failure — as part of the ride?

Because we’re afraid of feeling.


Think about it: In all those situations, our greatest fear is that we will feel something unpleasant.

What if you have that scary conversation you’ve been avoiding and it ends the relationship? It would hurt.

What if you follow through on the business idea and lose money? It would feel terrible.

What if you submitted the proposal and you were rejected? It would feel awful.

Here’s the thing: More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time. We feel the suffering of procrastination, or the frustration of a stuck relationship. I know partnerships that drag along painfully for years because no one is willing to speak about the elephant in the room. Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But how?

Practice.

Which you get by taking risks, feeling whatever you end up feeling, recognizing that it didn’t kill you, and then getting on the board and paddling back into the surf.

Have that difficult conversation. Listen without defensiveness when your colleague criticizes you. Name the elephant in the room. Get rejected.

And feel it all. Feel the anticipation of the risk. Feel the pre-risk cringe. Then, during the risk, and after, take a deep breath and feel that too.

You’ll become familiar with those feelings and, believe it or not, you’ll start to enjoy them. Even the ones you think of as unpleasant. Because feeling is what tells you you’re alive.

You know that sensation you get after you’ve done or said something weird or awkward? How you turn around and kind of wince in embarrassment? Next time that happens, take a moment to really feel it.

When you do, you’ll realize it’s not so bad. Maybe you’ll admit, “I don’t know why I just said that,” and apologize. Then maybe you’ll both laugh it off. Or maybe you’ll get into that conversation you’ve been avoiding for years but you know you need to have.

Soon, you won’t fear feeling. You’ll pursue it like those courageous early morning surfers. You’ll wake up before dawn and dive into those scary conversations and difficult proposals. You’ll take the risks that once scared you. And you’ll fall; sometimes you’ll even fail.

Then you’ll get up and do it again.


Peter Bregman is CEO of Bregman Partners, a company that helps senior leaders create accountability and inspire collective action on their organization’s most important work. Best-selling author of 18 Minutes, his most recent book is Leading with Emotional Courage. He is also the host of the Bregman Leadership Podcast. To receive an email when he posts, click here.
This article is about MANAGING YOURSELF

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Comments

POST
3 COMMENTS
Adam Muller a year ago

I really enjoyed this article. It's helpful to go one layer further, i.e. "I am afraid to do 'x' because if I fail, I worry people will think I'm stupid." is really, "I am afraid to do 'x' because if I fail, it will feel unpleasant if people think I'm stupid."

And you're right, not doing things because we're afraid of possible unpleasant feelings, itself makes us feel unpleasant!

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Vivek Johari

Shared May 23, 2018

Good read

Nicole Wilcox

Shared May 27, 2018

this is tru

Soe Wei Yan Phyo

Shared June 3, 2018

Feeling of fear and embarrassment is actually an enjoyable moment.

Practice.

Which you get by taking risks, feeling whatever you end up feeling, recognizing that it didn’t kill you, and then getting on the board and paddling back into the surf.

Have that difficult conversation. Listen without defensiveness when your colleague criticizes you. Name the elephant in the room. Get rejected.

And feel it all. Feel the anticipation of the risk. Feel the pre-risk cringe. Then, during the risk, and after, take a deep breath and feel that too.

You’ll become familiar with those feelings and, believe it or not, you’ll start to enjoy them. Even the ones you think of as unpleasant. Because feeling is what tells you you’re alive.

You know that sensation you get after you’ve done or said something weird or awkward? How you turn around and kind of wince in embarrassment? Next time that happens, take a moment to really feel it.

When you do, you’ll realize it’s not so bad. Maybe you’ll admit, “I don’t know why I just said that,” and apologize. Then maybe you’ll both laugh it off. Or maybe you’ll get into that conversation you’ve been avoiding for years but you know you need to have.

Soon, you won’t fear feeling. You’ll pursue it like those courageous early morning surfers. You’ll wake up before dawn and dive into those scary conversations and difficult proposals. You’ll take the risks that once scared you. And you’ll fall; sometimes you’ll even fail.

Then you’ll get up and do it again.

CCSI

Shared June 3, 2018

#Gettingstarted #Seizetheday #changeaday

Diane Cabral

Shared June 21, 2018

Interesting article

Lauryn Sheri

Shared July 4, 2018

This article is super encouraging, thanks

Mel Pullen

Shared July 7, 2018

Make it shorter. You’ll always fall eventually. Tell the boss, tell the investor, tell the publisher. If they don’t understand reality and don’t want to help then don’t work with them.

Ehab Goda

Shared July 12, 2018

The cure to procrastination

Belinda Jane

Shared July 23, 2018

Start feeling....

Ahmed Karra

Shared 5 days ago

.,;,!?+?!?9,

Malwared

Shared 1 day ago

I like this.

Cinzia Pompa

Shared February 8, 2017

For some reason I felt like crying reading this. Probably because it's the truth. This article reminded me of something I read about making decisions (even the decision to quit or just not do anything) reducing anxiety. It seems deciding to just goddamn do it - accepting that you're going to fall - gets you going.

Junior Gonzalez

Shared February 8, 2017

Awesome, inspiring read.

Elizabeth Wawrzyniak

Shared March 23, 2017

Here’s the thing: More often than not, our fear doesn’t help us avoid the feelings; it simply subjects us to them for an agonizingly long time. We feel the suffering of procrastination, or the frustration of a stuck relationship. I know partnerships that drag along painfully for years because no one is willing to speak about the elephant in the room. Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But how?

Practice.

Victoria R. L.

Shared July 21, 2017

Hay que arriesgar y enfrentarse a los miedos. No se pueden hacer esfuerzos a medias porque de todo se aprende, y de los fracasos más.

Antonio Giampalmo

Shared December 12, 2017

Very interesting: a wise life time hint !

Adam Sofokleous

Shared December 20, 2017

i often wince in embaressment. this read makes me feel good.

Deanna Douglas

Shared June 11, 2018

Sometimes ya just need to jump in the deep end of the pool.

Fabio Paiano

Shared February 7, 2017

Importante lembrar disso, para não desanimar em dias como hoje...

Una Ng

Shared February 7, 2017

Because we’re afraid of feeling.

Think about it: In all those situations, our greatest fear is that we will feel something unpleasant.

Una Ng

Shared February 7, 2017

Which you get by taking risks, feeling whatever you end up feeling, recognizing that it didn’t kill you, and then getting on the board and paddling back into the surf.

Nazish .

Shared February 8, 2017

So the answer is Just do it...

Paul Scale

Shared February 8, 2017

Interesting analogy

Rosie Arnold

Shared February 9, 2017

The only difference between a failure and a fizzle was the element of surprise

Candy Greenblott

Shared February 16, 2017

Very well written, concise and to the point. I actually heard what you said and felt a little splash of sea water while doing so! Thanks.

Mike

Shared February 15, 2017

excellent

エマ こ

Shared February 26, 2017

And when you fell — because if you take risks, you will fall — you’d get back on the board and paddle back into the surf. That’s what every single one of the surfers did.

So why don’t we live life that way? Why don’t we accept falling — even if it’s a failure — as part of the ride?

エマ こ

Shared February 26, 2017

Taking risks, and falling, is not something to avoid. It’s something to cultivate. But how?

Practice.

エマ こ

Shared February 26, 2017

Which you get by taking risks, feeling whatever you end up feeling, recognizing that it didn’t kill you, and then getting on the board and paddling back into the surf.

エマ こ

Shared February 26, 2017

And