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Jeffrey Zeldman

Shared December 21, 2016

The GOP, by positioning itself as the party of traditional values and law and order, unknowingly attracted what would turn out to be a vast and previously bipartisan population of Americans with authoritarian tendencies.

Much of the polarization dividing American politics was fueled not just by gerrymandering or money in politics or the other oft-cited variables, but by an unnoticed but surprisingly large electoral group — authoritarians.

Jodi Ettenberg

Shared March 3, 2016

Important, terrifying read.

Cameron Russell

Shared March 15, 2016

authoritarians, as a growing presence in the GOP, are a real constituency that exists independently of Trump — and will persist as a force in American politics regardless of the fate of his candidacy.

Diego Mendes

Shared March 15, 2016

Trump, it turns out, is just the symptom. The rise of American authoritarianism is transforming the Republican Party and the dynamics of national politics, with profound consequences likely to extend well beyond this election.

Rand Fishkin

Shared March 11, 2016

Insightful and data driven, this is a solid look into a previously less-talked-about group of American voters: "demographic and economic changes such as immigration, which "activated" authoritarian tendencies, leading many Americans to seek out a strongman leader who would preserve a status quo they feel is under threat and impose order on a world they perceive as increasingly alien."

Ty Ahmad-Taylor

Shared March 8, 2016

Good read on why people choose authoritarianism and the role it plays in the current electoral cycle.

Daniel Burka

Shared December 31, 2016

Authoritarians are thought to express much deeper fears than the rest of the electorate, to seek the imposition of order where they perceive dangerous change, and to desire a strong leader who will defeat those fears with force.

Daniel Burka

Shared December 31, 2016

Authoritarians are thought to express much deeper fears than the rest of the electorate, to seek the imposition of order where they perceive dangerous change, and to desire a strong leader who will defeat those fears with force.

Michael Sippey

Shared March 4, 2016

Horrifying.

Our results found that 44 percent of white respondents nationwide scored as "high" or "very high" authoritarians, with 19 percent as "very high." That's actually not unusual, and lines up with previous national survey

Martin Stabe

Shared March 1, 2016

authoritarians have their own set of policy preferences, distinct from GOP orthodoxy. And those preferences mean that, in real and important ways, authoritarians are their own distinct constituency: effectively a new political party within the GOP.

David Marcus

Shared March 13, 2016

One of the best piece around the sad place we're in.

Klaus Eck

Shared March 5, 2016

Republican politicians and Republican-leaning media such as Fox News have been telling viewers nonstop that the world is a terrifying place and that President Obama isn't doing enough to keep Americans safe.

There are a variety of political and media incentives for why this happens. But the point is that, as a result, Republican voters have been continually exposed to messages warning of physical dangers. As the perception of physical threat has risen, this fear appears to have led a number of non-authoritarians to vote like authoritarians — to support Trump.

David Ulevitch

Shared March 3, 2016

Mind blown. (And article way too long)

akid8964

Shared March 3, 2016

靠谱

Zach Brock

Shared March 8, 2016

Long but insightful read (with data!) about Trump's rise and the GOP divide.

Annemarie Gray

Shared March 19, 2016

The point, rather, is that the increasingly important political phenomenon we identify as right-wing populism, or white working-class populism, seems to line up, with almost astonishing precision, with the research on how authoritarianism is both caused and expressed.

Alex Watson

Shared March 6, 2016

Together, those three insights added up to one terrifying theory: that if social change and physical threats coincided at the same time, it could awaken a potentially enormous population of American authoritarians, who would demand a strongman leader and the extreme policies necessary, in their view, to meet the rising threats.

Josh Bancroft

Shared March 18, 2016

This is an utterly fascinating, scientific analysis of how American politics got to where it is in 2016: fear of the "other", the dangerous outgroup, and the upset of the social status quo. Must read.

Boy Ettema

Shared December 22, 2016

Nothing new here. Perhaps it is time to dust off the 1950's The Authoritarian Personality and understand how and why history repeat itself.

Blake Robinson

Shared March 2, 2016

Frightening stuff!

Niket Desai

Shared March 3, 2016

According to Stenner's theory, there is a certain subset of people who hold latent authoritarian tendencies. These tendencies can be triggered or "activated" by the perception of physical threats or by destabilizing social change, leading those individuals to desire policies and leaders that we might more colloquially call authoritarian.

It is as if, the NYU professor Jonathan Haidt has written, a button is pushed that says, "In case of moral threat, lock down the borders, kick out those who are different, and punish those who are morally deviant."

Steve Dean

Shared March 8, 2016

Authoritarians are thought to express much deeper fears than the rest of the electorate, to seek the imposition of order where they perceive dangerous change, and to desire a strong leader who will defeat those fears with force. They would thus seek a candidate who promised these things. And the extreme nature of authoritarians' fears, and of their desire to challenge threats with force, would lead them toward a candidate whose temperament was totally unlike anything we usually see in American politics — and whose policies went far beyond the acceptable norms.

A candidate like Donald Trump.

Jean-Paul Cozzatti

Shared March 3, 2016

Changing demographics and certainly continued rise in inequality plus latent Authoritarianism makes for a heady mix.

Chris Jones

Shared March 5, 2016

And so the rise of authoritarianism as a force within American politics means we may now have a de facto three-party system: the Democrats, the GOP establishment, and the GOP authoritarians.

And although the latter two groups are presently forced into an awkward coalition, the GOP establishment has demonstrated a complete inability to regain control over the renegade authoritarians, and the authoritarians are actively opposed to the establishment's centrist goals and uninterested in its economic platform.

Amanda Brown

Shared March 3, 2016

Interesting and terrifying theory on the rise of Donald Trump and how this will shape the future of our country.

Marco Herack

Shared October 25, 2016

Stehen die Republikaner in den USA vor einer Spaltung?

Autoritäre Denkweisen sind gerade "in". Sie waren es zwar schon immer, aber für die Demokratien dieser Welt scheint gerade ein Moment der Erkenntnis. Man wird das nicht los und es lasten zu viele Angstfaktoren auf den Gesellschaften,

Typen wie Trump, aber auch die AfD, unterscheiden sich im konservativen Spektrum vor allem dadurch, dass sie glaubhaft versichern zu handeln, wenn sie an die Macht kommen.

Vorbei ist also die Zeit, in denen Politiker einfach nur Dinge behaupten mussten und sie dann austarierten.. es geht jetzt weiter. Darin liegt eine Gefahr, sie erfordert Wachsamkeit, denn es geht nicht um Argumente, sondern eben die Fähigkeit zu Handeln. Allseitige Empörung scheint mir da nur bedingt ein guter Ratgeber.

Speziell für die USA kann das auch bedeuten, dass sich das Parteiensystem verändern muss, wenn es überleben wird. Denn wir haben die Spaltung auf beiden Seiten des Spektrums. Bei den Demokraten geht es nur mehr um soziale Fragen.

Josh

Shared March 6, 2016

Donald Trump could be just the first of many Trumps in American politics

Andy McIlwain

Shared March 5, 2016

Trump, it turns out, is just the symptom.

Aarón García del Real Lozano

Shared March 9, 2016

Donald Trump could be just the first of many Trumps in American politics, with potentially profound implications for the country.

Aarón García del Real Lozano

Shared March 9, 2016

#MustRead Entendiendo la situación política actual (y un poco a Donald Trump)

Matt Abrams

Shared March 5, 2016

Fear warps minds...and those that claim to be the greatest patriots want to shred The Constitution

eve massacre

Shared March 7, 2016

"In other words, what might look on the surface like bigotry was really much closer to Stenner's theory of "activation": that authoritarians are unusually susceptible to messages about the ways outsiders and social changes threaten America, and so lash out at groups that are identified as objects of concern at that given moment."

It's an interesting piece that I can't not read thinking about the AfD success in Germany but dear Vox: The reading is really spoiled by your weird clickbait style reading triggers. Strange style decision.

Crystal Gautreau

Shared March 8, 2016

I want to move to Canada.

Jasen Farmer

Shared March 2, 2016

The rise of #authoritarianism in American politics & its effect on splitting the GOP #fear #change #polisci @voxdotcom

Ramon Leon

Shared March 6, 2016

Best explanation of the Trump phenomenon that I have read

Carlos Jiménez Barragán

Shared March 27, 2016

de coña.

In South Carolina, a CBS News exit poll found that 75 percent of Republican voters supported banning Muslims from the United States. A PPP poll found that a third of Trump voters support banning gays and lesbians from the country. Twenty percent said Lincoln shouldn't have freed the slaves.

Lee Daly

Shared March 6, 2016

"We crunched a bunch of variables to tell you what any secondary school history student could".

Philipp von Hammerstein

Shared March 9, 2016

Long but very good read. Germans - replace Trump with AfD/Pegida

Donald Trump could be just the first of many Trumps in American politics, with potentially profound implications for the country.

Doran Schrantz

Shared March 1, 2016

This is completely fascinating.

Brenda S

Shared March 2, 2016

This is a must-read. The theory presented by the author helps to explain not only the rise of Trump, but the rise of the Tea Party in 2010.

Arya Sajedi

Shared March 16, 2016

Long but insightful breakdown of how Authoritarianism has been activated in the US. Critical reading for anyone that fears a Trump presidency.

Stephen Elliott

Shared March 1, 2016

A compelling (and scary) argument that an "authoritarian" base is transforming the Republican Party, explaining the rise of Trump (Drumpf) and authoritarian political figures in the past.

(In the same vein of argument as "The Righteous Mind," which describes the different kinds of righteousness liberals and conservatives tend to care about.)

Dominic Marchand

Shared March 4, 2016

If you're like me and have a hard time understanding the Trump phenomenon, this long read is both enlightening... and fuckin' depressing.

"How do people come to adopt, in such large numbers and so rapidly, extreme political views that seem to coincide with fear of minorities and with the desire for a strongman leader?

To answer that question, these theorists study what they call authoritarianism: not the dictators themselves, but rather the psychological profile of people who, under the right conditions, will desire certain kinds of extreme policies and will seek strongman leaders to implement them."

Robb Boyd

Shared March 4, 2016

Wow. This really does explain quite a bit.

Michael Matuzak

Shared March 6, 2016

what's scariest is not the candidate, but rather the extent and fervor of his support.

Derek Young

Shared March 1, 2016

The best explanation for the Trumpist takeover of the GOP.

Ryan Johnson

Shared March 2, 2016

Authoritarians generally and Trump voters specifically, we found, were highly likely to support five policies:

Using military force over diplomacy against countries that threaten the United States
Changing the Constitution to bar citizenship for children of illegal immigrants
Imposing extra airport checks on passengers who appear to be of Middle Eastern descent in order to curb terrorism
Requiring all citizens to carry a national ID card at all times to show to a police officer on request, to curb terrorism
Allowing the federal government to scan all phone calls for calls to any number linked to terrorism

j espinosa

Shared March 3, 2016

as if, the NYU professor Jonathan Haidt has written, a button is pushed that says, "In case of moral threat, lock down the borders, kick out those who are different, and punish those who are morally deviant."

Robert J. Sawyer

Shared March 4, 2016

Precisely apropos of the themes I explore in QUANTUM NIGHT.

Adam Champion

Shared March 9, 2016

to

Aarthi Ganesh

Shared January 27, 2017

Definitely a good read for those into the theories of why(s) and how(s) of authoritarianism.

Michael LeRoux

Shared March 3, 2016

The GOP Is splintering into two parties. What's really behind the rapid rise of Donald Trump.

Ole

Shared March 7, 2016

Vermutlich bester Artikel zum Thema Trump überhaupt! - long but worth it.

Tracy Ruggles

Shared March 8, 2016

TL;DR: your tendency towards authoritarianism is a *very* good predictor of your support for #drumph ... "characterized by a desire for order and a fear of outsiders"

Giles Whiting

Shared June 16, 2017

Truly fascinating - and pretty sad.

Giles Whiting

Shared June 16, 2017

Truly fascinating - and quite sad.

J Moneypenny

Shared March 2, 2016

Authoritarians are thought to express much deeper fears than the rest of the electorate, to seek the imposition of order where they perceive dangerous change, and to desire a strong leader who will defeat those fears with force. They would thus seek a candidate who promised these things. And the extreme nature of authoritarians' fears, and of their desire to challenge threats with force, would lead them toward a candidate whose temperament was totally unlike anything we usually see in American politics — and whose policies went far beyond the acceptable norms.

A candidate like Donald Trump.

Sandy Tesch Wilkins

Shared March 3, 2016

Terrifying.

Graeme Stewart

Shared March 4, 2016

Worth being cautious about the conclusions, but an interesting theory backed up with real evidence.

Carl Alexander

Shared March 4, 2016

"Authoritarianism reveals the connections between several seemingly disparate stories about American politics."

Mark Stansbury

Shared March 6, 2016

I highly recommend reading this article. Fascinating poll data and research. Troubling but enlightening. HT: @nickseguin

Paul Katcher

Shared March 8, 2016

A commonality among many of Donald Trump's supporters is a fear of physical danger and social change that affects the status quo. They see Trump as a strong, necessary solution, as he instigates unfounded panic.

Jordan Elpern-Waxman

Shared March 11, 2016

Let's hope their bipartisanship population turns out not to be *too* broad.

the GOP, by positioning itself as the party of traditional values and law and order, had unknowingly attracted what would turn out to be a vast and previously bipartisan population of Americans with authoritarian tendencies.

Jordan Elpern-Waxman

Shared March 11, 2016

Trump embodies the classic authoritarian leadership style: simple, powerful, and punitive

Matej Kurian

Shared August 30, 2017

, I lom,
v ik

I orunn

I

Naqeeb Memon

Shared March 3, 2016

Rise of a Trump-esque candidate explained

if social change and physical threats coincided at the same time, it could awaken a potentially enormous population of American authoritarians, who would demand a strongman leader and the extreme policies necessary, in their view, to meet the rising threats.

Cindy Rizzo

Shared March 5, 2016

Interesting analysis. Would love to read a counter argument.

Brice Gaillard

Shared March 9, 2016

un article passionnant facilement transposable à l'Europe et à la France

JJ Burnam

Shared March 9, 2016

"An irony of this primary is that the Republican establishment has tried to stop Trump by, among other things, co-opting his message. But when establishment candidates such as Marco Rubio try to match Trump's rhetoric on ISIS or on American Muslims, they may end up deepening the fear that can only lead voters back to Trump."

Anay Shah

Shared June 22, 2016

The back story to what's happening in America

Raisa Roo

Shared March 19, 2016

This explains a lot. Explains why Trump gets such a huge set of support.

Marco Harder

Shared January 21, 2017

Amazing study of authoritarian tendencies. Particularly interesting is how parenting styles have a correlation with it.

George Washington III

Shared March 2, 2016

How is Donald Trump winning? It's all here.

Carl Licata

Shared March 3, 2016

Revelatory

Kristopher Hooper

Shared March 5, 2016

A long but worthwhile read.

Joshua Russo

Shared March 8, 2016

A longish read, but the most coherent answer I've seen to the question, "Who ARE these people, and where did they come from?"

Michael Kwan

Shared March 1, 2016

Great academic research on the whys of this trend.

Adam Ochonicki

Shared March 3, 2016

An empathetic look at the conditions that have led the U.S. to a Kaufman-movie-style Trump candidacy

Daniel J. Aloisio

Shared March 4, 2016

Explanatory in a way that other trump articles aren't. Would have liked to see a comparison to anti euro groups like Frances national front, but quality nonetheless

Mark Fox

Shared March 11, 2016

Authoritarian tendencies plus economic insecurity plus War on blast made The Donald possible

Anton Lodder

Shared March 20, 2016

Who votes for a Donald anyways?

Dan. W.

Shared March 2, 2016

Perhaps strangest of all, it wasn't just Trump but his supporters who seemed to have come out of nowhere, suddenly expressing, in large numbers, ideas far more extreme than anything that has risen to such popularity in recent memory. In South Carolina, a CBS News exit poll found that 75 percent of Republican voters supported banning Muslims from the United States. A PPP poll found that a third of Trump voters support banning gays and lesbians from the country. Twenty percent said Lincoln shouldn't have freed the slaves.

Last September, a PhD student at the University of Massachusetts Amherst named Matthew MacWilliams realized that his dissertation research might hold the answer to not just one but all three of these mysteries.

Jason Woodrum

Shared March 3, 2016

This will help you understand why Trump is supported. Terrifying to say the least.

James Corley

Shared March 4, 2016

This is simultaneously a fantastic and horrifying piece. Fair warning: It's pretty long.

Michael Miller

Shared March 9, 2016

"In other words, what might look on the surface like bigotry was really much closer to Stenner's theory of "activation": that authoritarians are unusually susceptible to messages about the ways outsiders and social changes threaten America, and so lash out at groups that are identified as objects of concern at that given moment.

That's not to say that such an attitude is in some way better than simple racism or xenophobia — it is still dangerous and damaging, especially if it empowers frightening demagogues like Donald Trump."

Ben Sahlmüller

Shared March 13, 2016

Interesting analysis of the psychological and sociological background of current trends in the US. Insights are well transferable into current European politics as well.

Chris Cuellar

Shared March 19, 2016

Trump, it turns out, is just the symptom. The rise of American authoritarianism is transforming the Republican Party and the dynamics of national politics, with profound consequences likely to extend well beyond this election.

Gaston Salazar

Shared March 20, 2016

Para pensar. No es sólo un fenómeno de EUA.

Shitij Nigam

Shared July 14, 2017

Bit repetitive, but a good read nevertheless.

Benoit Terminet Schuppon

Shared March 9, 2016

People do not support extreme policies and strongman leaders just out of an affirmative desire for authoritarianism, but rather as a response to experiencing certain kinds of threats.

Russ Headlee

Shared March 2, 2016

A fascinating analysis of Trump in broader political context.

Tim Jones

Shared March 1, 2016

the rise of authoritarianism as a force within American politics means we may now have a de facto three-party system: the Democrats, the GOP establishment, and the GOP authoritarians.

Jie Qi Ng

Shared March 2, 2016

What's the correlation between rise of Donald Trump and the spiteful, extremist comments of the Leaders of Malaysia Ruling Party? Read on to find out (TL;DR: fear of challenge to status quo (perceived rights) = people voting favourably to forceful, extremist leader that vow to do or say "whatever necessary")

Vicki Whitaker

Shared March 2, 2016

This is a LONG--but incredibly important--explanation of what's going on in American politics.

Chris Attfield

Shared March 2, 2016

One of the best things written on the Trump phenomenon (and why it's not about Trump. Or the GOP)

Kyle Geib

Shared March 3, 2016

"Huh, well that explains it."

Mike Jacobs

Shared March 4, 2016

For decades, the Republican Party has been winning over authoritarians by implicitly promising to stand firm against the tide of social change, and to be the party of force and power rather than the party of negotiation and compromise. But now it may be discovering that its strategy has worked too well — and threatens to tear the party apart.

Daniel Sefik

Shared March 5, 2016

This election is just a sign of things to come.

Cary Collett

Shared March 13, 2016

If you are seeking to understand the sociology and psychology behind Trump, this article and the research it describes do a great job. Trump is, in short, a symptom of a confluence of social and political events and forces.

Luc Mainguy

Shared January 2, 2017

I don't post often, but this is an exceptionally well-researches article about the rise of Trump and the far-right in the United States. Kudos to Vox for the high-quality journalism!

Derick Lawson

Shared January 19, 2017

You don't need to read the whole thing, just the intro, to get the gist of it. However, it's a well written article.

Asad Ali

Shared April 11, 2017

Interesting data driven insights on the rise of authoritarianism

Pieter de Meer

Shared 2 days ago

Interesting political science

Louis Rossouw

Shared March 6, 2016

Wondering why Trump is so popular? Some answers here.

Kate McLeod

Shared March 3, 2016

Challenges to that order — diversity, influx of outsiders, breakdown of the old order — are experienced as personally threatening because they risk upending the status quo order they equate with basic security.

Jeff Bergin

Shared March 3, 2016

An interesting read and point of view worth considering this election season.

Josue Ledesma

Shared March 5, 2016

Hard to get behind this article when its foundation is a four-question binary test that identifies authoritarianism. A simple test cannot define such a complicated personality trait.

John Nolan

Shared March 6, 2016

own.

Josh Friedman

Shared March 8, 2016

Fascinating look at why Trump is resonating, and how, even if not elected, he provides a glimpse at a future political environment conducive to such voices.

For years now, before anyone thought a person like Donald Trump could possibly lead a presidential primary, a small but respected niche of academic research has been laboring over a question, part political science and part psychology, that had captivated political scientists since the rise of the Nazis.

How do people come to adopt, in such large numbers and so rapidly, extreme political views that seem to coincide with fear of minorities and with the desire for a strongman leader?

Nate Stokes

Shared March 11, 2016

This article on American authoritarianism and is correlation to Trump support, economic pressure on the white middle class and the rise of hate and xenophobia in response to perceived threats in particular groups of people raises some frightening points, with spring statistics. You should be very worried about Trump as POTUS.

Joel Cochran

Shared March 30, 2016

Lengthy, but well worth the read

Kachmann KAAA

Shared April 6, 2016

theory that seemed to have predicted, with such eerie accuracy, Trump's rise. An

Cansu

Shared April 21, 2016

"He polled a large sample of likely voters, looking for correlations between support for Trump and views that align with authoritarianism. What he found was astonishing: Not only did authoritarianism correlate, but it seemed to predict support for Trump more reliably than virtually any other indicator."

Gabriel B.

Shared July 1, 2016

Long read, but definitely worth your time. It's important to remember that even if Trump loses this fall, the people who supported him will still be here and they will still influence politics.

Selin Jessani

Shared July 10, 2016

Very interesting scientific analysis of why Trump's supporters are so "Trump crazed"...who knows how far this will take American political change in the coming years.

Daniel Banik

Shared July 18, 2016

I am sitting over here in Toronto and reading the stories and opinions about Sonia Kruger and Pauline Hanson and I was reminded of an article I read earlier this year about the rise of Donald Trump and authoritarianism in the US.

If you have a spare 10-15 minutes, take a read. It is an interesting perspective.

I know that some of you are outraged by the extreme and irrational views espoused by Kruger, Hanson, et al. but I worry that our furious reactions to these situations simply magnify the sense of fear and isolation that these people are already feeling, inducing them to reinforce there defences.

I don't have an answer to this problem and I am not excusing ignorance but I wonder if an angry reaction might be making matters worse.

Just a thought.

Cliff White

Shared December 28, 2016

#Activism

Adam Bromberg

Shared December 29, 2016

it's

Simon Blasco

Shared January 18, 2017

A very interesting view of the US political landscape and the, althouh seems peppered with political intent to place authoritarian as a label for a group wich is only recently been identified as a political force

Kevin Winn

Shared March 8, 2017

Frightening.

Kevin Winn

Shared March 8, 2017

Frightening, to say the least.

Pierre Des Courtis

Shared March 21, 2016

Please tell me which one you think is more important for a child to have: independence or respect for elders?
Please tell me which one you think is more important for a child to have: obedience or self-reliance?
Please tell me which one you think is more important for a child to have: to be considerate or to be well-behaved?
Please tell me which one you think is more important for a child to have: curiosity or good manners?

Jessi Jetpack

Shared December 20, 2016

I love social science

Patricia Chapman

Shared January 10, 2017

I see Independence as a way of showing respect for your elders by not putting the additional burden of having them take care of you.

independence

Patricia Chapman

Shared January 10, 2017

Blind obedience is like slavery. People should think for themselves and do the right thing or learn from doing the wrong thing. A group of people who are self-reliant will almost always determine the right course of action.

self-reliance

Patricia Chapman

Shared January 10, 2017

To be considerate is a human trait that shows one cares about other people's welfare. To be well behaved, means you're under the control of someone else, similar to slavery.

considerate

Patricia Chapman

Shared January 10, 2017

Curiosity is what has made this country and its people great scientists, engineers, explorers, inventors, diplomats, Nobel Prize winners, etc. A few people with bad manners or even a lot of people with bad manners usually turn off anybody and stifle progress.

curiosity

Marcus Seuser

Shared January 10, 2017

kuss

Rick Warnock

Shared March 1, 2016

Also read "The Authoritarians" by Bob Altimeter free at http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~altemey/

Dan Waldman

Shared March 1, 2016

Together, those three insights added up to one terrifying theory: that if social change and physical threats coincided at the same time, it could awaken a potentially enormous population of American authoritarians, who would demand a strongman leader and the extreme policies necessary, in their view, to meet the rising threats.

David Hirsch

Shared March 1, 2016

Interest aritlce that sheds light on the Trump phenomenon

Tony Lee

Shared March 2, 2016

Fascinating. Terrifying. Compelling

Penny Boone

Shared March 2, 2016

Really good article about what is going on based on real science...in case you haven't seen it. Penny

Penny Boone

Shared March 2, 2016

Now understand what is going on after reading this article. Long but VERY informative and based on real science.

Peggy

Shared March 3, 2016

Horrifying.

Shannon O'Brien-Lepp

Shared March 8, 2016

Explanation backed by research showing why a candidate like Trump is so popular right now.

Tyler heymann

Shared March 27, 2016

Scary, well written and very interesting

Nathan Martinez

Shared September 29, 2016

MacWilliams studies authoritarianism — not actual dictators, but rather a psychological profile of individual voters that is characterized by a desire for order and a fear of outsiders. People who score high in authoritarianism, when they feel threatened, look for strong leaders who promise to take whatever action necessary to protect them from outsiders and prevent the changes they fear.

So MacWilliams naturally wondered if authoritarianism might correlate with support for Trump.

He polled a large sample of likely voters, looking for correlations between support for Trump and views that align with authoritarianism. What he found was astonishing: Not only did authoritarianism correlate, but it seemed to predict support for Trump more reliably than virtually any other indicator. He later repeated the same poll in South Carolina, shortly before the primary there, and found the same results, which he published in Vox:

jonathan Vitriol

Shared October 14, 2016

another interesting article

Rob Mancuso Jr.

Shared December 20, 2016

Great read and interesting outlook on modern America

Toshito Maeda

Shared December 22, 2016

TWEET

Akkij Darvajkar

Shared January 8, 2017

ascent

Lauren Caruso

Shared January 26, 2017

My life has been way too chaotic for the past......Oh I don't know, 10 years? But I'm trying to desperately to wind it down. As soon as I heard he was running, I thought. No....no way. There aren't that many off the wall ignorant people who vote.....right? Now what all seemed like a bad dream, I would wake from and realize it was just that. A bad dream. Never did I believe I would live through an election like this. Never in my lifetime could a man like this be our president. I get the chills, nauseated, frustrated.....you name it. I still almost have to pinch myself and say wake up......take a look at this shit.
So.......this is a great read. For or against.

kitti ellen

Shared February 4, 2017

what. do. you. think?

Steve Graham

Shared February 7, 2017

A very interesting read! If you were left wondering what just happened when trumpy got in then this is a "must" read!

a

Tammy Westra

Shared February 8, 2017

Intresting

Morgan MacDonald

Shared February 9, 2017

What these changes have in common is that, to authoritarians, they threaten to take away the status quo as they know it — familiar, orderly, secure — and replace it with something that feels scary because it is different and destabilizing, but also sometimes because it upends their own place in society. According to the literature, authoritarians will seek, in response, a strong leader who promises to suppress the scary changes, if necessary by force, and to preserve the status quo.

Snow Chan

Shared February 11, 2017

"For years now, before anyone thought a person like Donald Trump could possibly lead a presidential primary, a small but respected niche of academic research has been laboring over a question, part political science and part psychology, that had captivated political scientists since the rise of the Nazis"

Sentot Prabutomo

Shared February 14, 2017

B j

lamulotte

Shared February 28, 2017

Trump as a symptom

What we found is a phenomenon that explains, with remarkable clarity, the rise of Donald Trump — but that is also much larger than him, shedding new light on some of the biggest political stories of the past decade. Trump, it turns out, is just the symptom. The rise of American authoritarianism is transforming the Republican Party and the dynamics of national politics, with profound consequences likely to extend well beyond this election.

Valeria Sali

Shared March 2, 2017

Terrifying..
#USA #politics

Samuel Hernandez

Shared March 12, 2017

Very interesting article

Tony Walker

Shared March 20, 2017

check this out

Darren Van Soye

Shared April 1, 2017

"That's important, because for years now, Republican politicians and Republican-leaning media such as Fox News have been telling viewers nonstop that the world is a terrifying place and that President Obama isn't doing enough to keep Americans safe."

Jeremy Mendoza

Shared April 11, 2017

The best read I've had on Vox so far. A very comprehensive ten-section piece on what is Authoritarianism, where does it come from, what do they want, and the fate of American politics after Trump.

Maruf Ahmed

Shared May 8, 2017

Donald Trump explained...

Brian The Man

Shared June 28, 2017

The media either doesn't understand those of us who make less than 100K or they are plain stupid OR they have an agenda. hmmm, which could ot be? none refelct well on their corrupt culture.

jo vance

Shared July 25, 2017

fascinating study applied to American politics

Nathurezza De Indira

Shared July 25, 2017

after irresponsibly allowing someone to express their oppressive views on the media,

In South Carolina, a CBS News exit poll found that 75 percent of Republican voters supported banning Muslims from the United States. A PPP poll found that a third of Trump voters support banning gays and lesbians from the country. Twenty percent said Lincoln shouldn't have freed the slaves.

Taofeek Odedina

Shared July 27, 2017

The Rise of American Authoritarianism

Julian

Shared August 24, 2017

The literature on authoritarianism suggests this is not just simple Islamophobia, but rather reflects a broader phenomenon wherein authoritarians feel threatened by people they identify as "outsiders" and by the possibility of changes to the status quo makeup of their communities.

Charles Claar

Shared September 20, 2017

Funny how anyone can take information and make it lean one way or the other, it's time to start cheering for one team with different people in it instead of your team with a bunch of mind numbed robots in it..!

Adam Friedl

Shared March 2, 2016

This is so fascinating.

Jacob Bush

Shared December 5, 2016

Disgusting.

a CBS News exit poll found that 75 percent of Republican voters supported banning Muslims from the United States. A PPP poll found that a third of Trump voters support banning gays and lesbians from the country. Twenty percent said Lincoln shouldn't have freed the slaves.

Robin Pollock

Shared January 20, 2017

Very valuable read

Elizabeth Wawrzyniak

Shared March 29, 2017

Authoritarians prioritize social order and hierarchies, which bring a sense of control to a chaotic world. Challenges to that order — diversity, influx of outsiders, breakdown of the old order — are experienced as personally threatening because they risk upending the status quo order they equate with basic security.

Sue Newman

Shared June 9, 2017

it's long but worth reading if you want to know how Trump became president - even more interesting it was written before the elections - mum

Mary Linda Gail Gibson

Shared December 19, 2016

I was always curious why trump, but also cited to another person this was just history repeating itself like Hitler. Isn't this just how history repeats itself?

Bert Onstott

Shared December 20, 2016

Interesting.