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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Melissa Kim

Shared January 12, 2017

Domesticity takes work, and we should recognize it, but we should also recognize that women are disproportionately primed to take on that work (I'm not free from the impulse or obsession either) and we should recognize that.

I don't know what my point here is, just that this story resonated pretty deeply and that that scares me.

Women said they yearned for more free time and that they hated doing most housework. But when they got free time, they used it to do housework—convinced that no one else could do it as well.

Arjun Malhotra

Shared December 16, 2017

Talk about another perspective!

Aylin Yardimci

Shared February 5, 2017

Meanwhile, what was once feminist blasphemy is now conventional wisdom: Generally speaking, mothers instinctively want to devote themselves to home more than fathers do. (Even Sandberg admits it. “Are there characteristics inherent in sex differences that make women more nurturing and men more assertive?” she asks. “Quite possibly.”) If feminism is not only about creating an equitable society but also a means to fulfillment for individual women, and if the rewards of working are insufficient and uncertain, while the tug of motherhood is inexorable, then a new calculus can take hold: For some women, the solution to resolving the long-running tensions between work and life is not more parent-friendly offices or savvier career moves but the full embrace of domesticity.

Marcella Chamorro

Shared December 26, 2016

"Every woman/mother's middle name is guilt." 😔

Nathan Maharaj

Shared April 3, 2018

A lot of feelings about this. (Including some resentment at the headline: you can arrive at this arrangement without rolling back to a 50s mentality.)

Sandeep Chowdary

Shared December 22, 2016

I believe this is what we need. Complement each other not something to prove!

Honza Felt

Shared February 23, 2017

It's difficult to comment on a piece like this. One interpretation is that feminism is undergoing evolution and will emerge transformed and victorious. Another viewpoint stipulates that the gen X women are turning to established order after not being able to make the current concept of feminism work. I'm undecided - if you feel like being a full-time mother, be one. Make sure you know the risks and constraints of your new role, though.

Patrick T Hoffman

Shared December 23, 2016

in the tumultuous 21st-century economy, depending on a career as a path to self-actualization can seem like a sucker’s bet.

Yuk Yu, Alison LEE

Shared June 29, 2017

so true

“I’ll just do it. It’ll be easier. I’ll just do it. It’ll be faster. I’ll do the dishes. I know where everything goes.”

Yuk Yu, Alison LEE

Shared June 29, 2017

“I knew I had it in me to be the best”

Courtney Tenz

Shared February 5, 2017

An infuriating read but worth a look to see where what women who don't buy into these myths are up against.

Amirreza H.A.

Shared February 12, 2017

This is not the retreat from high-­pressure workplaces of a previous generation but rather a more active awakening to the virtues of the way things used to be. Patricia Ireland, who lives on the Upper West Side, left her job as a wealth adviser in 2010 after her third child was born. Now, even though her husband, also in finance, has seen his income drop since the recession, she has no plans to go back to work. She feels it’s a privilege to manage her children’s lives—“not just what they do, but what they believe, how they talk to other children, what kind of story we read together. That’s all dictated by me. Not by my nanny or my babysitter.” Her husband’s part of the arrangement is to go to work and deposit his paycheck in the joint account. “I’m really grateful that my husband and I have fallen into traditional gender roles without conflict,” says Ireland. “I’m not bitter that I’m the one home and he goes to work. And he’s very happy that he goes to work.”

Amirreza H.A.

Shared February 12, 2017

In researching her 2010 book The Unfinished Revolution: Coming of Age in a New Era of Gender, Work and Family, New York University sociologist Kathleen Gerson found that, in spite of all the gains young women have made, about a quarter say they would choose a traditional domestic arrangement over the independence that comes with a career, believing not just “that only a parent can provide an acceptable level of care” but also that “they are the only parent available for the job.”

Yemi Jamgbadi

Shared January 21, 2017

the patience to truly enjoy being home with my kids and know that in the end family is what is important in life—not pushing papers at some crap job.”

Yemi Jamgbadi

Shared January 21, 2017

“I’m really grateful that my husband and I have fallen into traditional gender roles without conflict,” says Ireland. “I’m not bitter that I’m the one home and he goes to work. And he’s very happy that he goes to work.”

Yemi Jamgbadi

Shared January 21, 2017

“I feel like in today’s society, women who don’t work are bucking the convention we were raised with … Why can’t we just be girls? Why do we have to be boys and girls at the same time?” She and the legions like her offer a silent rejoinder to Sandberg’s manifesto, raising the possibility that the best way for some mothers (and their loved ones) to have a happy life is to make home their highest achievement.

Yemi Jamgbadi

Shared January 21, 2017

Before they marry, college students of both genders almost universally tell social scientists that they want marriages in which housework, child care, professional ambition, and moneymaking will be respectfully negotiated and fully shared.

Yemi Jamgbadi

Shared January 21, 2017

In her research, Gerson found that in times of stress men overwhelmingly revert to the traditional provider role, allowing them to justify punting on the dishes. “All [men],” she says, “agree that no matter what the gender revolution prescribes, it is still paramount for men to earn a living and support their families, which also implies taking a backseat as caregiver.”

Yemi Jamgbadi

Shared January 21, 2017

Professional status is not the only sign of importance, she says, and financial independence is not the only measure of success.

Ricardo Fahrig

Shared January 5, 2017

Last year, sociologists at the University of Washington found that the less cooking, cleaning, and laundry a married man does, the more frequently he gets laid.

Pascal Sygnet

Shared January 11, 2017

Depuis un PC c'est mieux

Aurora Kostezky

Shared February 28, 2017

I don't know how I feel about this piece. I can relate on many levels but on others it horrifies me. It's a long read, but I'd love to hear your thoughts....

Mel Green

Shared February 12, 2017

Interesting rise of a different form of feminism in the household #longreads

strangey

Shared December 20, 2016

the revolution that Friedan helped to spark both liberated women and allowed countless numbers of them to experience financial pressure and the profound dissatisfactions of the workaday grind. More women than ever earn some or all of the money their family lives on. But today, in the tumultuous 21st-century economy, depending on a career as a path to self-actualization can seem like a sucker’s bet.

Pierre Des Courtis

Shared December 18, 2017

Last year, sociologists at the University of Washington found that the less cooking, cleaning, and laundry a married man does, the more frequently he gets laid.

Michael

Shared February 23, 2018

I read this yesterday, it's a bit long but interesting...

Mara Chan

Shared January 19, 2017

The Feminine Mystique

Mara Chan

Shared January 19, 2017

If feminism is not only about creating an equitable society but also a means to fulfillment for individual women, and if the rewards of working are insufficient and uncertain, while the tug of motherhood is inexorable, then a new calculus can take hold: For some women, the solution to resolving the long-running tensions between work and life is not more parent-friendly offices or savvier career moves but the full embrace of domesticity.

Ephraim Dahne

Shared January 20, 2017

Women said they yearned for more free time and that they hated doing most housework. But when they got free time, they used it to do housework—convinced that no one else could do it as well.

Amy Kristofferson

Shared April 1, 2017

Reading The Feminine Mystique now, one is struck by the white-hot flame of Betty Friedan’s professional hunger, which made her into a prophet and a pioneer. But it blinded her as well: She presumed that all her suburban-housewife sisters felt as imprisoned as she did and that the gratification she found in her work was attainable for all. That was never true, of course; the revolution that Friedan helped to spark both liberated women and allowed countless numbers of them to experience financial pressure and the profound dissatisfactions of the workaday grind. More women than ever earn some or all of the money their family lives on. But today, in the tumultuous 21st-century economy, depending on a career as a path to self-actualization can seem like a sucker’s bet.

Amy Kristofferson

Shared April 1, 2017

If feminism is not only about creating an equitable society but also a means to fulfillment for individual women, and if the rewards of working are insufficient and uncertain, while the tug of motherhood is inexorable, then a new calculus can take hold: For some women, the solution to resolving the long-running tensions between work and life is not more parent-friendly offices or savvier career moves but the full embrace of domesticity

Amy Kristofferson

Shared April 1, 2017

The number of stay-at-home mothers rose incrementally between 2010 and 2011, for the first time since the downturn of 2008. While staying home with children remains largely a privilege of the affluent (the greatest number of America’s SAHMs live in families with incomes of $100,000 a year or more), some of the biggest increases have been among younger mothers, ages 25 to 35, and those whose family incomes range from $75,000 to $100,000 a year.

Amy Kristofferson

Shared April 1, 2017

today, technology helps them to avoid the isolation of their grandmothers and to show off the fruits of their labor. Across the Internet, on a million mommy blogs and Pinterest pages, these women—conceptual cousins of the bearded and suspendered artisanal bakers and brewers who reside in gentrified neighborhoods—are elevating homemaking to an art,

Amy Kristofferson

Shared April 1, 2017

Last year, sociologists at the University of Washington found that the less cooking, cleaning, and laundry a married man does, the more frequently he gets laid.

Amy Kristofferson

Shared April 1, 2017

A number of those I spoke to for this article reminded me of a 2010 British study showing that men lack the same mental bandwidth for multitasking as women.

ember x

Shared June 19, 2017

Very long and interesting read, but I'm rather depressed by the end of it. :'(

Noah Kiekel

Shared May 23, 2018

This is long but really good. You should read it when you get a chance :)

Giovana Nahas

Shared April 20, 2017

texto sobre feminismo que comentei ontem... bem longo, mas se vc tiver interesse, vale dar umas pinceladas

Rodrigo López

Shared April 15, 2018

Get a load of this, Bagviringuis