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Leland Maschmeyer

Shared May 15, 2017

Interesting thesis: we all live in VR

Siddarth Raman

Shared June 19, 2017

Deep

Valentin Muro

Shared May 10, 2017

The crucial problem isn’t creating new jobs. The crucial problem is creating new jobs that humans perform better than algorithms. Consequently, by 2050 a new class of people might emerge – the useless class. People who are not just unemployed, but unemployable.

Adriii Izquierdo

Shared January 15, 2018

Futuro, presente, religión, realidad virtual y el sentido de la vida.

Aditya Sankaran

Shared May 16, 2017

h/t Amarnath

"In his groundbreaking essay, Deep Play: Notes on the Balinese Cockfight (1973), the anthropologist Clifford Geertz describes how on the island of Bali, people spent much time and money betting on cockfights. The betting and the fights involved elaborate rituals, and the outcomes had substantial impact on the social, economic and political standing of both players and spectators.

The cockfights were so important to the Balinese that when the Indonesian government declared the practice illegal, people ignored the law and risked arrest and hefty fines. For the Balinese, cockfights were “deep play” – a made-up game that is invested with so much meaning that it becomes reality. A Balinese anthropologist could arguably have written similar essays on football in Argentina or Judaism in Israel."

Aaron McQuinn

Shared June 7, 2017

"Do we really want to live in a world in which billions of people are immersed in fantasies, pursuing make-believe goals and obeying imaginary laws? Well, like it or not, that’s the world we have been living in for thousands of years already."

Marina Levy

Shared May 15, 2017

In any case, the end of work will not necessarily mean the end of meaning, because meaning is generated by imagining rather than by working. Work is essential for meaning only according to some ideologies and lifestyles.

Marina Levy

Shared May 15, 2017

The remunerated works or jobs themselves aren't already a deep (deep) play? It can be compared to religions and they are as well VIRTUAL REALITY GAMES... wake up! So, what is real, after all?

In any case, the end of work will not necessarily mean the end of meaning, because meaning is generated by imagining rather than by working. Work is essential for meaning only according to some ideologies and lifestyles.

Andy McIlwain

Shared January 10, 2018

The crucial problem isn’t creating new jobs. The crucial problem is creating new jobs that humans perform better than algorithms. Consequently, by 2050 a new class of people might emerge – the useless class. People who are not just unemployed, but unemployable.

Andy McIlwain

Shared January 10, 2018

People must engage in purposeful activities, or they go crazy. So what will the useless class do all day?

Andy McIlwain

Shared January 10, 2018

English country squires, present-day ultra-orthodox Jews, and children in all cultures and eras have found a lot of interest and meaning in life even without working.

Njagî M'Mwenda

Shared June 4, 2017

The crucial problem isn’t creating new jobs. The crucial problem is creating new jobs that humans perform better than algorithms. Consequently, by 2050 a new class of people might emerge – the useless class. People who are not just unemployed, but unemployable

Njagî M'Mwenda

Shared June 4, 2017

What is a religion if not a big virtual reality game played by millions of people together? Religions such as Islam and Christianity invent imaginary laws, such as “don’t eat pork”, “repeat the same prayers a set number of times each day”, “don’t have sex with somebody from your own gender” and so forth. These laws exist only in the human imagination. No natural law requires the repetition of magical formulas, and no natural law forbids homosexuality or eating pork. Muslims and Christians go through life trying to gain points in their favorite virtual reality game. If you pray every day, you get points. If you forget to pray, you lose points. If by the end of your life you gain enough points, then after you die you go to the next level of the game (aka heaven).

ahmed abdul fatah

Shared December 17, 2017

interesting read

Salonee Sanghvi

Shared July 29, 2017

Consequently, by 2050 a new class of people might emerge – the useless class. People who are not just unemployed, but unemployable.

ahmed abdul fatah

Shared May 13, 2017

المقال ده فشيخ

Justin Ng

Shared May 9, 2017

"In any case, the end of work will not necessarily mean the end of meaning, because meaning is generated by imagining rather than by working. Work is essential for meaning only according to some ideologies and lifestyles. Eighteenth-century English country squires, present-day ultra-orthodox Jews, and children in all cultures and eras have found a lot of interest and meaning in life even without working. People in 2050 will probably be able to play deeper games and to construct more complex virtual worlds than in any previous time in history.

But what about truth? What about reality? Do we really want to live in a world in which billions of people are immersed in fantasies, pursuing make-believe goals and obeying imaginary laws? Well, like it or not, that’s the world we have been living in for thousands of years already."

Saager Mhatre

Shared November 6, 2017

Wait, how is acquiring real value a virtual transaction?

Consumerism too is a virtual reality game. You gain points by acquiring new cars, buying expensive brands and taking vacations abroad, and if you have more points than everybody else, you tell yourself you won the game.

Saager Mhatre

Shared November 6, 2017

Are we confusing economic utility and value?

But the religious really enjoy praying and performing ceremonies, and my nephew really enjoys hunting Pokémon.

Martin Sivertsen

Shared May 9, 2017

Gamers. We're all gamers. #virtualfutures

Seb Barker

Shared May 8, 2017

love harari but his tendency to end paragraphs in this style leave him sounding nauseatingly gauche

For thousands of years, billions of people have found meaning in playing virtual reality games. In the past, we have called these virtual reality games “religions”.

Lubomir Zrnecko

Shared May 12, 2017

"Consequently, by 2050 a new class of people might emerge – the useless class. "

"Economically redundant people (!!!) might spend increasing amounts of time within 3D virtual reality worlds"

"This, in fact, is a very old solution. For thousands of years, billions of people have found meaning in playing virtual reality games. In the past, we have called these virtual reality games “religions”."

Will O'Neill

Shared May 14, 2017

For thousands of years, billions of people have found meaning in playing virtual reality games. In the past, we have called these virtual reality games “religions”.

For thousands of years, billions of people have found meaning in playing virtual reality games. In the past, we have called these virtual reality games “religions”.

Sandeep C Kannikanti

Shared May 18, 2017

In the end, the real action always takes place inside the human brain.

Doug Hamlin

Shared October 9, 2017

You don’t need to go all the way to Israel to see the world of post-work. If you have at home a teenage son who likes computer games, you can conduct your own experiment. Provide him with a minimum subsidy of Coke and pizza, and then remove all demands for work and all parental supervision. The likely outcome is that he will remain in his room for days, glued to the screen. He won’t do any homework or housework, will skip school, skip meals and even skip showers and sleep. Yet he is unlikely to suffer from boredom or a sense of purposelessness. At least not in the short term.

Hence virtual realities are likely to be key to providing meaning to the useless class of the post-work world. Maybe these virtual realities will be generated inside computers. Maybe they will be generated outside computers, in the shape of new religions and ideologies. Maybe it will be a combination of the two. The possibilities are endless, and nobody knows for sure what kind of deep plays will engage us in 2050.

Wally Punsapy

Shared May 9, 2017

"What is a religion if not a big virtual reality game played by millions of people together?"

The Matrix will save us. Just believe.

Kaloian Parchev

Shared May 13, 2017

They

Yestin Johnson

Shared January 8, 2018

Fascinating read

Ritika Upadhyay

Shared May 15, 2017

In any case, the end of work will not necessarily mean the end of meaning, because meaning is generated by imagining rather than by working. Work is essential for meaning only according to some ideologies and lifestyles. Eighteenth-century English country squires, present-day ultra-orthodox Jews, and children in all cultures and eras have found a lot of interest and meaning in life even without working. People in 2050 will probably be able to play deeper games and to construct more complex virtual worlds than in any previous time in history.

But what about truth? What about reality? Do we really want to live in a world in which billions of people are immersed in fantasies, pursuing make-believe goals and obeying imaginary laws? Well, like it or not, that’s the world we have been living in for thousands of years already.

Adonai Hm

Shared December 30, 2017

Do we really want to live in a world in which billions of people are immersed in fantasies, pursuing make-believe goals and obeying imaginary laws? Well, like it or not, that’s the world we have been living in for thousands of years already.

Danilo Barboza

Shared July 6, 2017

Do we really want to live in a world in which billions of people are immersed in fantasies, pursuing make-believe goals and obeying imaginary laws? Well, like it or not, that’s the world we have been living in for thousands of years already.

Henry Babbage

Shared May 8, 2017

The idea of finding meaning in life by playing virtual reality games is of course common not just to religions, but also to secular ideologies and lifestyles. Consumerism too is a virtual reality game. You gain points by acquiring new cars, buying expensive brands and taking vacations abroad, and if you have more points than everybody else, you tell yourself you won the game.

Jesse Muchai

Shared May 9, 2017

the

Hazary Nic

Shared January 14, 2018

Everything happens in people’s minds

yh chng

Shared June 5, 2017

The idea of finding meaning in life by playing virtual reality games is of course common not just to religions, but also to secular ideologies and lifestyles. Consumerism too is a virtual reality game. You gain points by acquiring new cars, buying expensive brands and taking vacations abroad, and if you have more points than everybody else, you tell yourself you won the game.

parap

Shared December 12, 2017

What is a religion if not a big virtual reality game played by millions of people together?

Arpit Modi

Shared April 15, 2018

Loved how he compared religion to being a virtual world

Janice Pang

Shared June 4, 2017

Oh shit.

Daniel Mbure

Shared December 22, 2017

For thousands of years, billions of people have found meaning in playing virtual reality games. In the past, we have called these virtual reality games “religions”.

Thomas van der Straten

Shared May 11, 2017

In any case, the end of work will not necessarily mean the end of meaning, because meaning is generated by imagining rather than by working. Work is essential for meaning only according to some ideologies and lifestyles. Eighteenth-century English country squires, present-day ultra-orthodox Jews, and children in all cultures and eras have found a lot of interest and meaning in life even without working

hpm Meyer

Shared May 27, 2017

Very good read! Recommended.

Joakim Ejenstam

Shared July 26, 2017

the end of work will not necessarily mean the end of meaning, because meaning is generated by imagining rather than by working

Camilo Luna

Shared December 11, 2017

To the best of our scientific knowledge, human life has no meaning. The meaning of life is always a fictional story created by us humans.

Dennis Mooney

Shared May 10, 2017

For the Balinese, cockfights were “deep play” – a made-up game that is invested with so much meaning that it becomes reality. A Balinese anthropologist could arguably have written similar essays on football in Argentina or Judaism in Israel.

Anurag Sen

Shared December 17, 2017

what about truth? What about reality? Do we really want to live in a world in which billions of people are immersed in fantasies, pursuing make-believe goals and obeying imaginary laws? Well, like it or not, that’s the world we have been living in for thousands of years already.

Michael (thisiswilson) Wilson

Shared May 10, 2017

The crucial problem isn’t creating new jobs. The crucial problem is creating new jobs that humans perform better than algorithms.

Ankit Kumar

Shared February 6, 2019

Very fun read

Lukas Rosenstock

Shared May 8, 2017

The crucial problem isn’t creating new jobs. The crucial problem is creating new jobs that humans perform better than algorithms. Consequently, by 2050 a new class of people might emerge – the useless class. People who are not just unemployed, but unemployable.

James Stevens

Shared May 10, 2017

Do we really want to live in a world in which billions of people are immersed in fantasies, pursuing make-believe goals and obeying imaginary laws?

Ahmed Sadawi

Shared May 28, 2017

To the best of our scientific knowledge, human life has no meaning. The meaning of life is always a fictional story created by us humans.

Ahmed Sadawi

Shared May 28, 2017

Though they are poor and never work, in survey after survey these ultra-orthodox Jewish men report higher levels of life-satisfaction than any other section of Israeli society. In global surveys of life satisfaction, Israel is almost always at the very top, thanks in part to the contribution of these unemployed deep players.

Timo Litzius

Shared January 2, 2018

In any case, the end of work will not necessarily mean the end of meaning, because meaning is generated by imagining rather than by working.

Kash Dhanda

Shared January 18, 2018

But what about truth? What about reality? Do we really want to live in a world in which billions of people are immersed in fantasies, pursuing make-believe goals and obeying imaginary laws? Well, like it or not, that’s the world we have been living in for thousands of years already.

Leon Ras

Shared February 10, 2019

“For thousands of years, billions of people have found meaning in playing virtual reality games.”

Diego B

Shared June 30, 2017

For thousands of years, billions of people have found meaning in playing virtual reality games. In the past, we have called these virtual reality games “religions”.

Matej Vajda

Shared September 28, 2017

What is a religion if not a big virtual reality game played by millions of people together? Religions such as Islam and Christianity invent imaginary laws, such as “don’t eat pork”, “repeat the same prayers a set number of times each day”, “don’t have sex with somebody from your own gender” and so forth. These laws exist only in the human imagination. No natural law requires the repetition of magical formulas, and no natural law forbids homosexuality or eating pork. Muslims and Christians go through life trying to gain points in their favorite virtual reality game. If you pray every day, you get points. If you forget to pray, you lose points. If by the end of your life you gain enough points, then after you die you go to the next level of the game (aka heaven).

Sebastian Żołnowski

Shared December 24, 2017

The crucial problem is creating new jobs that humans perform better than algorithms. Consequently, by 2050 a new class of people might emerge – the useless class.

Nuria Muro

Shared March 23, 2018

The crucial problem isn’t creating new jobs. The crucial problem is creating new jobs that humans perform better than algorithms.

Purnima Mehta

Shared May 15, 2017

The crucial problem is creating new jobs that humans perform better than algorithms.

Jacqueline Dozier

Shared June 2, 2017

Pretty extreme view on the role of entertainment and games in the future and a controversial commentary on religion, but many good points.

Viktor Petersson

Shared July 9, 2017

What is a religion if not a big virtual reality game played by millions of people together?

Fergus Meiklejohn

Shared December 21, 2017

Ouch..

For thousands of years, billions of people have found meaning in playing virtual reality games. In the past, we have called these virtual reality games “religions”.

Ricky Guzman

Shared December 30, 2017

Thoughtful and blasphemous

Rob de Bruyn

Shared December 31, 2017

Great story by Yuval Noah Harari “live is a virtual reality game, it has always been”

Saad Hasnain

Shared January 13, 2019

Yuval Noah Herrari at his best!

María Fernández

Shared May 11, 2017

"The meaning of life is always a fictional story created by us humans."

Esra Hsn

Shared June 5, 2017

good

Frank Russi

Shared July 27, 2017

A great essay about not so distant future of humankind. What will we do when automation has taken our jobs?

Joe Glick

Shared January 3, 2018

Ready Player One spoiler

césar pallares

Shared March 2, 2018

Interesante artículo sobre el futuro de las personas inempleables

Macartan Gaughan

Shared May 17, 2017

Sudharshan Viswanathan

Shared May 9, 2017

Analogies that jump a lot of different spaces - life, religion, work, AI, happiness

In any case, the end of work will not necessarily mean the end of meaning, because meaning is generated by imagining rather than by working.

Josh Javier

Shared May 9, 2017

we saw two others kids on the street who were hunting the same Pokémon, and we almost got into a fight with them. It struck me how similar the situation was to the conflict between Jews and Muslims about the holy city of Jerusalem. When you look at the objective reality of Jerusalem, all you see are stones and buildings. There is no holiness anywhere. But when you look through the medium of smartbooks (such as the Bible and the Qur’an), you see holy places and angels everywhere.

Rita Heine

Shared May 12, 2017

Wow - very good read'

Sea Iaw Ang

Shared May 12, 2017

Consumerism too is a virtual reality game. You gain points by acquiring new cars, buying expensive brands and taking vacations abroad, and if you have more points than everybody else, you tell yourself you won the game.

Brian Wong

Shared February 6, 2019

The crucial problem is creating new jobs that humans perform better than algorithms. Consequently, by 2050 a new class of people might emerge – the useless class.

Vibhu Satpaul

Shared December 29, 2017

How Deep play could be a work environment.

keldom 90500

Shared April 5, 2018

You might object that people really enjoy their cars and vacations. That’s certainly true. But the religious really enjoy praying and performing ceremonies, and my nephew really enjoys hunting Pokémon. In the end, the real action always takes place inside the human brain

Catalin Dinut

Shared May 15, 2017

Ssssht, nu așa tare, ca unii oameni o sa se supere un pic.
" To the best of our scientific knowledge, human life has no meaning. The meaning of life is always a fictional story created by us humans."

Pablo Jorge

Shared June 10, 2017

But what about truth? What about reality? Do we really want to live in a world in which billions of people are immersed in fantasies, pursuing make-believe goals and obeying imaginary laws? Well, like it or not, that’s the world we have been living in for thousands of years already.

sasha thomas

Shared May 9, 2017

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