Beta
Must Read on Pocket

This is one of the most-saved, read, and shared stories on Pocket.

Recommendations from Pocket Users

Daniel Burka

Shared March 13, 2017

During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

Jesse Hicks

Shared January 26, 2017

This strategy also explains the name that was given to crossing illegally on foot: jaywalking. During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

But jaywalking caught on (and eventually became one word). Safety organizations and police began using it formally, in safety announcements.

Wesley Verhoeve

Shared March 28, 2017

Smh

Wesley Verhoeve

Shared November 21, 2017

Oy vey

Lionel Dricot

Shared December 19, 2016

How the automotive industry changed the public space

Gary Illyes

Shared December 26, 2016

Did you ever wonder where the word "jaywalking" comes from?

Alex Henke

Shared August 5, 2017

In the 1920s, auto groups redefined who owned the city street

Alex Henke

Shared August 5, 2017

the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city

Pallavi Sreerama

Shared December 21, 2016

This strategy also explains the name that was given to crossing illegally on foot: jaywalking. During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

Blake Boznanski

Shared January 6, 2017

Who knew jaywalking was invented by the auto industry?

Guilherme Silva

Shared March 2, 2017

"In the 1920s, auto groups redefined who owned the city street"

Ted McCarthy

Shared January 25, 2017

Interesting history of jaywalking. Two things stand out though - 1) The article makes it sound like jaywalking is this strongly-enforced, widely-followed law, when the only time I've ever heard of enforcement was friends of friends (of friends) in Seattle.

And 2), the article doesn't at all mention the way in which having roads designated for traffic alone makes traffic a whole lot more *efficient*. I'm writing this while in India, and it seems that o many roads here are still very much a "public space", full of pedestrians and bikes and rickshaws and trucks and cows. And it makes traffic *awful*.

Jasen Farmer

Shared December 21, 2016

#fakenews & #lobbying in 20s shifted story from car crashes to "accidents" to take streets from pedestrians @voxdotcom

Even while passing these laws, however, auto industry groups faced a problem: In Kansas City and elsewhere, no one had followed the rules, and they were rarely enforced by police or judges. To solve it, the industry took up several strategies.

One was an attempt to shape news coverage of car accidents. The National Automobile Chamber of Commerce, an industry group, established a free wire service for newspapers: Reporters could send in the basic details of a traffic accident and would get in return a complete article to print the next day. These articles, printed widely, shifted the blame for accidents to pedestrians — signaling that following these new laws was important.

Tamara Atanasoska

Shared March 28, 2017

everything we take for granted is a social construct and we can undo it if we wanted

Karn Kher

Shared January 30, 2017

Not so long back, roads were for walking. How did it get pushed to the pavements?

Dami Adebayo

Shared January 18, 2017

Interesting.

Erdogan Cesmeli

Shared December 24, 2016

Something similar to take place human-driver vs self-driving cars?

p gonzamirez

Shared January 6, 2017

the terms comes from negative views towards rural migrants/non-city folks.

Suman Ganguli

Shared April 2, 2018

Vox quick hit from cpl yrs ago, interviewing this historian & summarizing his book:

"In the early days of the automobile, it was drivers' job to avoid you, not your job to avoid them," says Peter Norton, a historian at the University of Virginia and author of *Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City.* "But under the new model, streets became a place for cars — and as a pedestrian, it's your fault if you get hit."

Nishant Totla

Shared April 10, 2017

Who would have thought?

Grzegorz Aksamit

Shared May 2, 2017

Jak kierowcy odebrali miasto pieszym.

One was an attempt to shape news coverage of car accidents. The National Automobile Chamber of Commerce, an industry group, established a free wire service for newspapers: Reporters could send in the basic details of a traffic accident and would get in return a complete article to print the next day. These articles, printed widely, shifted the blame for accidents to pedestrians — signaling that following these new laws was important.

Addie Chernow

Shared December 24, 2016

I feel somewhat that this is changing. Especially in cities that are now going after drivers who don't stop for pedestrians.

Jasmine Wynona

Shared January 27, 2017

""This strategy also explains the name that was given to crossing illegally on foot: jaywalking. During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety."

Jaana Metsamaa

Shared January 30, 2017

Vinge turundus

Fern Lim

Shared February 15, 2017

Fascinating. Also a bit disturbing that we assume that how it is is how it's been and how it should be.

Auto campaigners lobbied police to publicly shame transgressors by whistling or shouting at them — and even carrying women back to the sidewalk — instead of quietly reprimanding or fining them.

Natthakarn Amatyakul

Shared February 23, 2017

"To most people, this seems part of the basic nature of roads. But it's actually the result of an aggressive, forgotten 1920s campaign led by auto groups and manufacturers that redefined who owned the city streets."

To most people, this seems part of the basic nature of roads. But it's actually the result of an aggressive, forgotten 1920s campaign led by auto groups and manufacturers that redefined who owned the city streets.

Alex Krefetz

Shared May 16, 2017

The National Automobile Chamber of Commerce, an industry group, established a free wire service for newspapers: Reporters could send in the basic details of a traffic accident and would get in return a complete article to print the next day. These articles, printed widely, shifted the blame for accidents to pedestrians — signaling that following these new laws was important.

Stuart Dobson

Shared January 8, 2018

propaganda 101

Sarit Amar

Shared February 20, 2017

לקוראי אמ;דק

Dimitris Koukoulakis

Shared November 29, 2017

Interesting story. I find similarities to the current situation with the Internet...

Mauricio Jiménez

Shared September 4, 2017

Así comenzó la triste historia de como perdimos las calles.

Maria Fitzsimmons

Shared January 3, 2017

Corporations run very effective campaigns to defend their values and vision, no matter who is hurt.

Lance

Shared January 14, 2017

the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker"

Margaret Tran

Shared January 16, 2017

Well then.

Becky Ofrane

Shared March 28, 2017

particularly relevant today it seems.

Greg Sirochinsky

Shared December 22, 2016

In a 1924 New York safety campaign, a clown was marched in front of a slow-moving Model T and rammed repeatedly

In a 1924 New York safety campaign, a clown was marched in front of a slow-moving Model T and rammed repeatedly

Greg Sirochinsky

Shared December 22, 2016

In a 1924 New York safety campaign, a clown was marched in front of a slow-moving Model T and rammed repeatedly

Patrick Shortall

Shared January 1, 2017

Fascinating story. I'm glad jaywalking didn't catch on in Ireland.

Reggie Nu

Shared December 27, 2017

The National Automobile Chamber of Commerce, an industry group, established a free wire service for newspapers: Reporters could send in the basic details of a traffic accident and would get in return a complete article to print the next day. These articles, printed widely, shifted the blame for accidents to pedestrians

Rebecca Lee

Shared March 20, 2018

In the 1920s, auto groups redefined who owned the city street

strangey

Shared December 20, 2016

"In the early days of the automobile, it was drivers' job to avoid you, not your job to avoid them," says Peter Norton, a historian at the University of Virginia and author of Fighting Traffic: The Dawn of the Motor Age in the American City. "But under the new model, streets became a place for cars — and as a pedestrian, it's your fault if you get hit."

88 pocket2013

Shared March 5, 2017

Hehe, good to know.

Moshe Levin

Shared December 17, 2016

Very Smart Article, RECOMMEND :-))

Destiny Cruz

Shared January 10, 2017

Interesting read...

Vishvanath Daluwatte

Shared January 27, 2017

A good insight in to how what we accept today as the norm has evolved.
Autonomous vehicles may change it more and what's accepted in 50 years time maybe very different

Craig Bovis

Shared February 14, 2017

"This strategy also explains the name that was given to crossing illegally on foot: jaywalking. During this era, the word 'jay' meant something like 'rube' or 'hick' — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word 'jay walker' as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety."

Nawawish K.

Shared March 7, 2017

"This strategy also explains the name that was given to crossing illegally on foot: jaywalking. During this era, the word "jay" meant something like "rube" or "hick" — a person from the sticks, who didn't know how to behave in a city. So pro-auto groups promoted use of the word "jay walker" as someone who didn't know how to walk in a city, threatening public safety.

At first, the term was seen as offensive, even shocking. Pedestrians fired back, calling dangerous driving "jay driving."

But jaywalking caught on (and eventually became one word). Safety organizations and police began using it formally, in safety announcements.


Ultimately, both the word jaywalking and the concept that pedestrians shouldn't walk freely on streets became so deeply entrenched that few people know this history. "The campaign was extremely successful," Norton says. "It totally changed the message about what streets are for.""

Sam zuo

Shared March 28, 2017

Fascinating account on how jaywalk law passed. Perhaps what's more interesting to ask is how many of these outdated and one-sided laws are in effect today.

Anthony Xu

Shared May 1, 2017

Give back the streets to the people!

Gediminas Žygus

Shared May 4, 2017

Fail to do so, and you're committing a crime: jaywalking. In some cities — Los Angeles, for instance — police ticket tens of thousands of pedestrians annually for jaywalking, with fines of up to $250.

To most people, this seems part of the basic nature of roads. But it's actually the result of an aggressive, forgotten 1920s campaign led by auto groups and manufacturers that redefined who owned the city streets.

Jeffrey Dunster

Shared May 10, 2017

A great example of the power of social media campaigns (before digital social media) and it showcases the modern impacts and amnesia we suffer for that public opinion reversal.

I wish we had less dominance by cars today. I think they have far broader impacts on our social interactions than we recognize. Radio, tv and internet are obvious hindrances to real community interactions, small businesses, social welfare, and community engagement. Cars need to be recognized along with them.

Wichai Sawangpongkasame

Shared July 30, 2017

เป็นตัวอย่างที่ดีสำหรับการตั้งคำถามว่าความปกติแบบ modern เป็นสามัญสำนึก หรือเพิ่งถูกสร้าง

Balázs Bognár

Shared August 13, 2017

This hasn't got to India yet 😀

Nurizzati Rohim

Shared September 26, 2017

interesting.

Anupriya Jain

Shared November 30, 2017

Made to the top of my Friday morning reading list. Short, super interesting read on historical strategic thinking!

Adam Sambuco

Shared December 10, 2017

Interesting. I don't disagree with the campaign, but it's crazy that I had no idea this happened.

Edgars Skrinda

Shared January 11, 2018

Дружественные Кредиты для юридических лиц https://www.cityfinances.lv/ru/

Derek Harkness

Shared January 16, 2018

Interesting to add to this article that the crime of jaywalking is a very American one. The same forces didn't influence other countries to the same extent. So in the UK, pedestrians treat pelicans lights and zebra crossings as advisory, not compulsory.

Rafe Langston

Shared January 21, 2018

Much more interesting than I expected it to be.

航平 冨岡

Shared March 4, 2018

jaywalking"

Alan Shaw

Shared April 1, 2018

“Before formal traffic laws were put in place, judges typically ruled that in any collision, the larger vehicle — that is, the car — was to blame. In most pedestrian deaths, drivers were charged with manslaughter regardless of the circumstances of the accident.”

Bob Szekely

Shared February 21, 2017

Today, it literally has become a life-safety issue, with all the reckless and distracted driving. Now if only we could mount a successful campaign to get other drivers to end the dangerous practice of constantly tailgating....