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Recommendations from Pocket Users

M.G. Siegler

Shared December 27, 2015

As many stars as there are in our galaxy (100 – 400 billion), there are roughly an equal number of galaxies in the observable universe—so for every star in the colossal Milky Way, there’s a whole galaxy out there. All together, that comes out to the typically quoted range of between 1022 and 1024 total stars, which means that for every grain of sand on every beach on Earth, there are 10,000 stars out there.

Casey Newton

Shared January 1, 2016

Start the year by blowing your own mind regarding the place of humankind in the universe.

As we continue along with our possibly-futile search for extraterrestrial intelligence, I’m not really sure what I’m rooting for. Frankly, learning either that we’re officially alone in the universe or that we’re officially joined by others would be creepy, which is a theme with all of the surreal storylines listed above—whatever the truth actually is, it’s mindblowing.

Tom Voûte tom at voute .org

Shared May 7, 2016

I love Waitbutwhy.com

Michael Sippey

Shared March 5, 2016

Pro tip I wish someone had told me: read this stoned.

given that my normal outlook is that humanity is a lonely orphan on a tiny rock in the middle of a desolate universe, the humbling fact that we’re probably not as smart as we think we are, and the possibility that a lot of what we’re sure about might be wrong, sounds wonderful.

Nat Friedman

Shared May 7, 2016

The best summary of the Fermi Paradox and its possible solutions I've ever read.

Adam Debreczeni

Shared January 22, 2016

Good late night read.

Omar Shahine

Shared May 22, 2016

Another awesome post from Tim. Are we alone?

Benjamin Tincq

Shared January 18, 2016

The Fermi Paradox, or "are we the only intelligent beings in the universe" ?

Benjamin Tincq

Shared January 18, 2016

The Fermi Paradox, or "are we the only intelligent beings in the universe" ?

Aatman Shah

Shared January 19, 2017

where are we?

That said, given that my normal outlook is that humanity is a lonely orphan on a tiny rock in the middle of a desolate universe, the humbling fact that we’re probably not as smart as we think we are, and the possibility that a lot of what we’re sure about might be wrong, sounds wonderful. It opens the door just a crack that maybe, just maybe, there might be more to the story than we realize.

Boy Ettema

Shared November 27, 2016

Great article on the silence of the universe.

Petro Nek

Shared January 5, 2016

Може то зробити переклад-адаптацію статті

Anshul Roy

Shared August 21, 2016

A very fascinating read.

Chris Jones

Shared December 9, 2015

Old Tim Urban favorite.

Nick Firoozye

Shared January 29, 2016

Really thought provoking.

Arthur Swiniarski

Shared May 4, 2016

The Fermi Paradox also leaves me with a deep humbling

Eli Glasner

Shared September 5, 2016

If you're looking for a bigger perspective on things ;)

Fergus Ryan

Shared May 19, 2016

Louis Grenier put me on to this, great thoughts on whether we're alone or not...
I've used The Fermi Paradox when discussing the relative danger in MMA.

Loris Grillet

Shared January 29, 2016

One of the best article about life out there and our place in the universe…

Awais Imran

Shared January 22, 2016

Mind-blowing.

A long-form article discussing the all important question: "Is there intelligent life out there in the universe?"

Seyed Rasoul Jabari

Shared December 15, 2015

It'll blow your mind.

Hari Narain r

Shared February 13, 2016

such a refreshing read about the endless possibilities that surround our galaxy.

Shreeniwas Iyer

Shared June 7, 2016

Whatay humbling writeup!!

jory boy

Shared February 9, 2017

see

Marcela Krzemień

Shared January 15, 2016

"There are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach." #awesomereadalert

Jasen Farmer

Shared February 8, 2016

I love to learn about what we do not yet know #space #Fermi #aliens #life

The Fermi Paradox brings out a sharper, more personal humbling, one that can only happen after spending hours of research hearing your species’ most renowned scientists present insane theories, change their minds again and again, and wildly contradict each other—reminding us that future generations will look at us the same way we see the ancient people who were sure that the stars were the underside of the dome of heaven, and they’ll think “Wow they really had no idea what was going on.”

Błażej Gantz

Shared April 15, 2016

So, where is everybody?

Martin Wickman

Shared July 3, 2016

Det finns tusentals andra civilisationer i vår närhet, ändå gör det inte det... Varför?

Rachel Ann Chua

Shared February 7, 2016

very interesting theories about the universe

Akim Boyko

Shared March 20, 2016

The #Space, The Fermi Paradox and The Great Filter, or reason why I stop donating CPU time to #SETI

Fred Rocha

Shared May 27, 2018

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach

Jason Lemay

Shared June 12, 2016

Is there other intelligent life out there?

Mirela Mustata

Shared October 19, 2016

given that my normal outlook is that humanity is a lonely orphan on a tiny rock in the middle of a desolate universe, the humbling fact that we’re probably not as smart as we think we are, and the possibility that a lot of what we’re sure about might be wrong, sounds wonderful. It opens the door just a crack that maybe, just maybe, there might be more to the story than we realize.

Michael Lindner

Shared March 5, 2016

Everyone should read and think about it from time to time...

Hadeer Ghazal

Shared December 31, 2016

فين المخلوقات الفضائيه ؟

Iftekhar Inan

Shared June 5, 2016

a fascinating read... if you are interested about cosmology and alien life, you should read it. If you are not interested you should read it too.

Tim Baker

Shared June 18, 2016

there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world

Gergely Fügedi

Shared August 7, 2016

This is old, but still mind-blowing.

Jeff Boes

Shared March 26, 2016

Back to the first WBW article I read, and the one that hooked me on Tim's incredible blog...


Continuing to speculate, if 1% of intelligent life survives long enough to become a potentially galaxy-colonizing Type III Civilization, our calculations above suggest that there should be at least 1,000 Type III Civilizations in our galaxy alone—and given the power of such a civilization, their presence would likely be pretty noticeable. And yet, we see nothing, hear nothing, and we’re visited by no one.

So where is everybody?

Welcome to the Fermi Paradox.

Morgaine Swann

Shared May 8, 2016

For every grain of sand on every beach on earth there are 10,000 stars...

Adonai Hm

Shared June 24, 2016

Excellent article on life in the Universe!

Brad Miller

Shared May 8, 2016

"It turns out that when it comes to the fate of humankind, this question is very important. Depending on where The Great Filter occurs, we’re left with three possible realities: We’re rare, we’re first, or we’re fucked."

Audie T3 xkdbfksondo????????????????

Shared April 17, 2016

location

Audie T3 xkdbfksondo????????????????

Shared April 18, 2016

j c cloy

Audie T3 xkdbfksondo????????????????

Shared April 26, 2016

Gcknvjhv

Denis Postu

Shared August 30, 2016

Excellent read!

Georgina Grey

Shared January 1, 2016

"It turns out that when it comes to the fate of humankind, this question is very important. Depending on where The Great Filter occurs, we’re left with three possible realities: We’re rare, we’re first, or we’re fucked."

Sommah P

Shared May 11, 2016

My friend who sent me this said "I'm level x" and I said more like "Or maybe we’re the aliens and we were planted here...as a form of fertilizer."

Awesome read

simulation.

Vincent DiMichele

Shared June 23, 2016

👽

Adam Waselnuk

Shared August 8, 2016

So fun to contemplate!

M V

Shared July 17, 2017

As we continue along with our possibly-futile search for extraterrestrial intelligence, I’m not really sure what I’m rooting for. Frankly, learning either that we’re officially alone in the universe or that we’re officially joined by others would be creepy, which is a theme with all of the surreal storylines listed above—whatever the truth actually is, it’s mindblowing.

Chaitanya RunRunRunRunRun

Shared December 29, 2015

Guaranteed to make you feel insignificant.

waleed samy

Shared January 15, 2016

where is everybody?

Mark Gilliland

Shared January 15, 2016

Just some light mind-blowing reading for a Saturday morning.

Christopher Schrader

Shared January 23, 2016

However, something scientists call “observation selection effect” suggests that anyone who is pondering their own rarity is inherently part of an intelligent life “success story”—and whether they’re actually rare or quite common, the thoughts they ponder and conclusions they draw will be identical

Prabakar Baskar

Shared February 7, 2016

A MUST READ

Diego Serrano

Shared February 10, 2016

Genial

We’re rare, we’re first, or we’re fucked.

Oros Robert

Shared May 16, 2016

nice read

Needa Seff

Shared February 10, 2017

Been imagining for so long if there is (are) any other civilization(s) out there. So happy I read this! 🤗🙀

Alap Bharadwaj

Shared November 26, 2017

The legendary waitbutwhy article about the Fermi Paradox. Must read, if for nothing else, than to gain a big dose of self awareness :)

Maurin Lagassat

Shared December 27, 2015

One of the best reading about the Fermi Paradox

Shane Barnhill

Shared January 3, 2016

SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is an organization dedicated to listening for signals from other intelligent life. If we’re right that there are 100,000 or more intelligent civilizations in our galaxy, and even a fraction of them are sending out radio waves or laser beams or other modes of attempting to contact others, shouldn’t SETI’s satellite dish array pick up all kinds of signals?

But it hasn’t. Not one. Ever.

SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) is an organization dedicated to listening for signals from other intelligent life. If we’re right that there are 100,000 or more intelligent civilizations in our galaxy, and even a fraction of them are sending out radio waves or laser beams or other modes of attempting to contact others, shouldn’t SETI’s satellite dish array pick up all kinds of signals?

But it hasn’t. Not one. Ever.

Pietr Hitzig

Shared January 5, 2016

A powerful analysis of extra terrestrial lìfe

wouldn’t

Kryštof Rainisch

Shared January 10, 2016

so alone

Kryštof Rainisch

Shared January 10, 2016

so alone

Omkar Mishra

Shared February 7, 2016

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach

Christopher Arnold

Shared April 26, 2016

We’re rare, we’re first, or we’re fucked.

We’re rare, we’re first, or we’re fucked.

Karthik Vivek

Shared May 8, 2016

Where IS everybody?

John Paul Weesner

Shared June 18, 2016

Mind-Numbing and Mind-Blowing at the same time.

Antonio Conejos

Shared June 25, 2016

Even if you're already familiar with the Fermi paradox you'll find this interesting.

Ingrid Espinosa

Shared July 27, 2016

excellent brief of many new and various theories about one of the oldest questions between space and man; animatedly written! :)

Trey Reasonover

Shared September 2, 2016

stars

Ayush Chaturvedi

Shared September 14, 2016

Fascinating read..Superb!

Jason Asomani

Shared October 8, 2016

I don't think you'll ever know how insignificant earth is until you read this article

Mohammed Hisamuddin

Shared April 9, 2017

Can't be explained any better 😵

Jim Atkinson

Shared April 15, 2017

A brilliant thought provoking read. The Great Filter is a scary idea I've never come across.

Guillaume Verdier

Shared January 4, 2016

there’s a potentially-habitable Earth-like planet orbiting at least 1% of the total stars in the universe—a total of 100 billion billion Earth-like planets.

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach

Christopher Bennison

Shared January 6, 2016

Heavy.

Panumarch Anantachaiwanich

Shared February 21, 2016

This article was really enjoying.

Possibility 2) The galaxy has been colonized, but we just live in some desolate rural area of the galaxy. The Americas may have been colonized by Europeans long before anyone in a small Inuit tribe in far northern Canada realized it had happened.

Jamie Roper

Shared March 11, 2016

A very good read what ever you think.

Darshit Patel

Shared April 25, 2016

Mind fuck

Luke Davis

Shared August 8, 2016

This is very very good

Boris Bosiak

Shared January 10, 2016

Here on Earth, we’re the king of our little castle, proud ruler of the huge group of imbeciles who share the planet with us. And in this bubble with no competition and no one to judge us, it’s rare that we’re ever confronted with the concept of being a dramatically inferior species to anyone.

Tasha Jefry

Shared February 8, 2016

i like it♥

Paul Dariye

Shared February 22, 2016

the humbling fact that we’re probably not as smart as we think we are, and the possibility that a lot of what we’re sure about might be wrong, sounds wonderful.

Brandon Beall

Shared March 1, 2016

This article got me all kinds of fucked up. Space is amazing and insanely incomprehensible.

Ozgur Kusakoglu

Shared May 8, 2016

Yeyo.
Fermi Paradox.
'Where is everybody?'

Bob Clint

Shared May 24, 2016

This is cool read it

Shashank Verma

Shared June 16, 2016

Damn.

Manuel Ricci

Shared July 9, 2016

numeri, teorie, ipotesi e paradossi sulla vita aliena nell'universo

Joydeep Biswas

Shared October 4, 2016

It is long. But, it is worth a read.

Tanmay Mody

Shared October 7, 2016

Mind = Blown.

Rox De Leon

Shared November 1, 2016

Possibility # 10 is so Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy 😂

Stephane Jaglin

Shared December 22, 2016

Best article I have read this year, so much to think about!

Jane Berlin

Shared January 17, 2017

I can not recomended anything more then I do Wait But Why!

Abhinay Dhole

Shared February 16, 2017

One of the most brilliant and mind blowing articles I have ever come across!!! Superb, well written and well explained.. a big big food for thought!!!

Tom Filepp

Shared April 10, 2017

shhhh

Nassim Sultan

Shared January 2, 2016

Further, recorded history only goes back 5,500 years—a group of ancient hunter-gatherer tribes may have experienced some crazy alien shit, but they had no good way to tell anyone in the future about it.

Timilehin Odusina

Shared February 25, 2016

funny read

Erich Bilal

Shared March 22, 2016

loved this "Where is everybody?"

Daryl Hiebert

Shared April 4, 2016

Super awesome reading. Humbling, scary, and even though I don't know which side I'm cheering for, I'm pretty excited.

Bruno Henderyckx

Shared May 12, 2016

Are we alone in this universe. Turns out that there are many theories, some crazier then others.

Tao Hansen

Shared June 12, 2016

There's no aliens because our future will annihilate us.

Petar Kashev

Shared August 20, 2016

Дълъг, но интересен текст за т. нар. Fermi Paradox - има ли други интелигентни същества във вселената освен хората?

Andy Mackensen

Shared August 30, 2016

Super sick. Mind-blowing.

Xinyi Tieu

Shared September 8, 2016

"... the possible inevitability that nearly all intelligent civilizations end up destroying themselves once a certain level of technology is reached."

We’re rare, we’re first, or we’re fucked.

Wellington Mariusso

Shared September 30, 2016

Old but gold

Marcelo Facchinato

Shared October 13, 2016

Sem dúvidas um dos melhores textos científicos que já li.

Neil Joseph

Shared January 4, 2017

Do not skip this one! A very interesting read.

Peter Gerr

Shared March 16, 2017

Read. Learn. Ponder.

Ziyanna Johnson

Shared April 3, 2017

Yes

Clement Williams

Shared July 23, 2017

A mind Boggler particularly looking at the figures involved

Let’s imagine that after billions of years in existence, 1% of Earth-like planets develop life (if that’s true, every grain of sand would represent one planet with life on it). And imagine that on 1% of those planets, the life advances to an intelligent level like it did here on Earth. That would mean there were 10 quadrillion, or 10 million billion intelligent civilizations in the observable universe.

Clement Williams

Shared July 23, 2017

YES I CONCLUDED #10 BASED ON THE INFO WITHOUT EVEN KNOWING IT WAS ONE OF THE TEN OPTIONS

Possibility 10) We’re completely wrong about our reality. There are a lot of ways we could just be totally off with everything we think. The universe might appear one way and be something else entirely, like a hologram. Or maybe we’re the aliens and we were planted here as an experiment or as a form of fertilizer. There’s even a chance that we’re all part of a computer simulation by some researcher from another world, and other forms of life simply weren’t programmed into the simulation.

Mathieu Bouckenhove

Shared December 13, 2015

Mind = blown.

Gonzalo Pardo

Shared January 3, 2016

This is very old, but awesome.

John Haprian

Shared January 18, 2016

”Either we’re rare, we’re first, or we’re fucked."

Kim

Shared January 21, 2016

mind - blown

Jasper Jansen

Shared February 3, 2016

One of the most thought-provoking blog posts I've read in years.

Michael Flores

Shared February 13, 2016

A great look into why it may be that we're seemingly alone in the universe.

Luiz Veloso

Shared April 9, 2016

Excelente artigo

Tim Searle

Shared April 21, 2016

Long but amazing read

David Lounsbury

Shared May 14, 2016

The relative youth of the solar system means that older systems would not have had access to heavier elements resulting from stellar fusion and supernovae. Imagine an advanced civilization without any materials heavier than, say, aluminum or silicon.

Brian Truong

Shared May 15, 2016

Now please excuse me while I have an existential breakdown

Calle Liljeholm

Shared May 15, 2016

Where is everybody?

Matt Ritter

Shared May 15, 2016

Mind-bending.

Vandana K

Shared May 24, 2016

Mind boggling stuff!

Varun Shukla

Shared June 17, 2016

You've read this, right?

Robert Cretu

Shared June 24, 2016

To get our minds off the daily troubles, let us see the big picture. The really BIG picture. #MindBlown #Fascinating

Didier van Amerongen

Shared June 25, 2016

minimaal 1x per jaar lezen!

Ankush Deshmukh

Shared June 30, 2016

Mind Blown!

Maurice Roach

Shared July 14, 2016

As usual, a #great #article from Wait but Why

Hui Qian Liang

Shared July 21, 2016

Space, man.

Chris Moon

Shared September 23, 2016

That said, given that my normal outlook is that humanity is a lonely orphan on a tiny rock in the middle of a desolate universe, the humbling fact that we’re probably not as smart as we think we are, and the possibility that a lot of what we’re sure about might be wrong, sounds wonderful. It opens the door just a crack that maybe, just maybe, there might be more to the story than we realize.

Artem Bandin

Shared September 28, 2016

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach.

Karpova Ira

Shared September 29, 2016

Beyond its shocking science fiction component, The Fermi Paradox also leaves me with a deep humbling. Not just the normal “Oh yeah, I’m microscopic and my existence lasts for three seconds” humbling that the universe always triggers. The Fermi Paradox brings out a sharper, more personal humbling, one that can only happen after spending hours of research hearing your species’ most renowned scientists present insane theories, change their minds again and again, and wildly contradict each other—reminding us that future generations will look at us the same way we see the ancient people who were sure that the stars were the underside of the dome of heaven, and they’ll think “Wow they really had no idea what was going on.”

Akanksha Tiwari

Shared November 24, 2016

Yup :)

Miriam Miciano

Shared January 2, 2017

"The humbling fact that we’re probably not as smart as we think we are, and the possibility that a lot of what we’re sure about might be wrong, sounds wonderful." 💓

Roland Hanekroot

Shared November 3, 2017

great piece on the contradictions of discs and intelligent life

Jorge Bay Gondra

Shared December 14, 2017

A comprehensive analysis to the question: “Where is everybody”

Zka Zakaria

Shared March 19, 2016

Bacaan menarik di minggu siang ini...

Zka Zakaria

Shared March 20, 2016

Bacaan menarik di Minggu siang ini...

Matthew A Berman

Shared January 13, 2016

Mind blowing

Maya Lunastar

Shared February 7, 2016

there’s a potentially-habitable Earth-like planet orbiting at least 1% of the total stars in the universe—a total of 100 billion billion Earth-like planets.

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach.

Rolf Thijsen

Shared February 10, 2016

It opens the door just a crack that maybe, just maybe, there might be more to the story than we realize.

Steve M

Shared February 12, 2016

If you enjoy contemplating the universe and alien life, this is a must read!

Alban Gruget

Shared February 20, 2016

Where is everybody ?
Une série d'hypothèses (en anglais) pour répondre au paradoxe de Fermi.
Où comment se sentir tour à tour fourmis, dieux, indiens d’Amérique, virus, clones, seuls, survivants, condamnés, aliens, précurseurs, attardés, proies ou juste chanceux.
http://waitbutwhy.com/2014/05/fermi-paradox.html

James Illingworth

Shared March 11, 2016

Fermi, this is one of the clearest articles explaining the Paradox. Also, THOSE NUMBERS IN THE FIRST PART!

Gabe Scelta

Shared April 14, 2016

"So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach. Moving forward, we have no choice but to get completely speculative. Let’s imagine that after billions of years in existence, 1% of Earth-like planets develop life (if that’s true, every grain of sand would represent one planet with life on it). And imagine that on 1% of those planets, the life advances to an intelligent level like it did here on Earth. That would mean there were 10 quadrillion, or 10 million billion intelligent civilizations in the observable universe."

Daniel Chappell

Shared May 5, 2016

Where is everybody?

Christian Neudert

Shared May 7, 2016

The

Elioth Monroy

Shared May 9, 2016

Let's talk about the Milky Way

Timothy Hopkins

Shared May 11, 2016

Mind blowing article about our universe and intelligent life

Walerian Mazur

Shared May 24, 2016

We're rare, we're first or we're
fucked

Alexandru Ionut Bujdei

Shared May 29, 2016

The most thorough explanation of the Fermi Paradox I have ever read.

Neil Grey

Shared June 10, 2016

Why are we alone?

Elliott Klaassen

Shared July 3, 2016

Short and easily digestible breakdown of the Fermi Paradox

Taka Kame

Shared July 10, 2016

フラクタル!

Jitin Nair

Shared July 22, 2016

All together, that comes out to the typically quoted range of between 1022 and 1024 total stars, which means that for every grain of sand on every beach on Earth, there are 10,000 stars out there.

Jitin Nair

Shared July 22, 2016

for every grain of sand on every beach on Earth, there are 10,000 stars out there.

Jitin Nair

Shared July 22, 2016

Earth-like planet orbiting at least 1% of the total stars in the universe—a total of 100 billion billion Earth-like planets.

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world.

Kevin Jones

Shared August 25, 2016

Entertaining read. But why could we not also speculate divine purposes in the universe. There was a tremendous amount of faith at work in those theories

Tara Dmitrović

Shared September 4, 2016

a must read!

Nakul Kurane

Shared November 13, 2016

Possibility 7) We are receiving contact from other intelligent life, but the government is hiding it.

Travis Vocino

Shared January 23, 2017

Physicist Enrico Fermi felt something too—”Where is everybody?”

Vishwas Shrikhande

Shared February 24, 2017

Opening our minds in many directions

Nitish Pai

Shared April 22, 2017

#madness

lijith mohandas

Shared November 12, 2017

>this is great

Sahar Fayyat

Shared December 4, 2017

Yes

Gaurav Sharma

Shared January 23, 2018

favourite mindblasting topic!

José Ferreira

Shared May 26, 2018

"If we’re right that there are 100,000 or more intelligent civilizations in our galaxy, and even a fraction of them are sending out radio waves or laser beams or other modes of attempting to contact others, shouldn’t SETI’s satellite dish array pick up all kinds of signals?

But it hasn’t. Not one. Ever.

Where is everybody?"

Calvin Nguyen

Shared April 6, 2018

That said, given that my normal outlook is that humanity is a lonely orphan on a tiny rock in the middle of a desolate universe, the humbling fact that we’re probably not as smart as we think we are, and the possibility that a lot of what we’re sure about might be wrong, sounds wonderful. It opens the door just a crack that maybe, just maybe, there might be more to the story than we realize.

Romain Marquer

Shared July 8, 2018

Where is everyone? 🌑👽

Sebastian Andreatta

Shared December 28, 2015

Hi Micha! This is a good one. :-)

somesh kilari

Shared January 7, 2016

Read this.

Keagen Edwards

Shared January 7, 2016

So much for sleeping soundly ever again.

Rachel Koblic

Shared January 10, 2016

Loved this article. What if we're just a bunch of ants unable to comprehend the ten-lane super-highway being built next door?

Mel Oakley

Shared February 12, 2016

Very interesting read

Andrew Chaifetz

Shared February 15, 2016

Finally someone who not only goes over Fermi paradox but the reason why we haven't found life yet.

Pree Rao

Shared March 5, 2016

This is an excellent article and makes you think quite a lot about human existence.

Neville Farrell

Shared March 13, 2016

Fascinating read about what the discovery of life means for humankind...

Bostrom believes that when it comes to The Fermi Paradox, “the silence of the night sky is golden.”

Sabri Chaabne

Shared April 8, 2016

Reading this gave such fuckin' uneasiness.

Paul Mutawe

Shared April 18, 2016

-Nov hhf the nN

Paul Mutawe

Shared April 18, 2016

;"iiiuiiiug7uj=j({=Fiji v I by

Tom DiMauro

Shared May 4, 2016

😳

Nigel Boor

Shared May 6, 2016

Somewhat mind blowing...

Tomo Albanese

Shared May 6, 2016

This is a humbling and terrifying article. Well worth the read.

Luis Hoyo

Shared May 8, 2016

Mind-blowing like hell. Excellent scientific article.

Adelene Tie

Shared May 13, 2016

So, where is everybody else?: enlightening theories behind some of your existential queries.

Victor Chico

Shared May 14, 2016

Must read.

Campbell Hall

Shared May 20, 2016

interesting

Jane Ang Jia Xuan

Shared May 26, 2016

Mysteries to discover in space

Rodrigo Barbosa

Shared May 29, 2016

Interessante

Joe Pennetti

Shared June 3, 2016

Love it!

Spr Asg

Shared June 5, 2016

Best astro stuff ever

Akshay Patil

Shared June 8, 2016

The view above all the things that we call life.

John Herse

Shared June 12, 2016

Jong ngob

Michal Boleslav Měchura

Shared June 15, 2016

Comment with your favourite theory why we haven't found any extraterrestrial civilizations yet!

Suraj Rathi

Shared June 18, 2016

Very well explained!!

Soo Lin

Shared June 26, 2016

rare

jeroen hamminga

Shared June 30, 2016

Great! Love it!

Brian Hurtado

Shared July 2, 2016

Wow.

Ross Farley

Shared July 3, 2016

Where is everybody?

Martijn vdv

Shared July 15, 2016

Goede samenvatting van de Fermi Paradox.

Antti Tähtinen

Shared July 29, 2016

Holy shit

Amol Kasbekar

Shared July 31, 2016

Everything you need to know about Fermi Paradox and more

Fernando Diniz

Shared August 6, 2016

Onde está todo mundo?

Pratheek

Shared August 25, 2016

Why hasn't an alien species contacted us yet? Answers to the question, and yes, there are many reasons why.

Judson Graham

Shared August 29, 2016

phenomal read

deepesh kaushik

Shared September 6, 2016

100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world

Joe Young

Shared September 7, 2016

WHAT, HELP MAX

Ulysses Potiguara

Shared September 9, 2016

Pharadoph

Dan Cohn

Shared September 18, 2016

This is a brilliant summary of the possible answers to the really big question.

Jon Ong

Shared October 2, 2016

Mind bending

Javeria

Shared November 17, 2016

the newest children in a strange and uncertain cosmos should listen quietly for a long time, patiently learning about the universe and comparing notes, before shouting into an unknown jungle that we do not understand.

Javeria

Shared November 17, 2016

!

whatever the truth actually is, it’s mindblowing.

Javeria

Shared November 17, 2016

whatever the truth actually is, it’s mindblowing.

Niels Visker

Shared November 23, 2016

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach... waaaa mindblown

beach

Rick

Shared December 20, 2016

Where is everyone?

Alessandro Ruschioni

Shared January 12, 2017

Exceptionally put ...

Sugirtha Krishnamurthy

Shared December 20, 2017

omg I am inspired to right a scifi after reading this 😀

Alexis Coelho

Shared April 4, 2018

This 👌

Alex C

Shared January 23, 2016

An amazing read about the sheer scale of the known universe and how it should be teeming with life.

Brian Nichols

Shared March 26, 2016

For when you have a few minutes to have your mind blown

Eric Beeler

Shared September 14, 2017

If you haven't already, read this. Interesting and humbling :)

Mairen Lacerna

Shared June 12, 2018

Hahaha 💩🤣😂

Possibility 7) We are receiving contact from other intelligent life, but the government is hiding it.

Nikola Jankovic

Shared December 22, 2015

Where is everybody - it is almost impossible there are no millions of civilizations more advanced than us. But why don't we see them? Excellent one!

Михаил Ходорковский★

Shared December 30, 2015

Inc.

Erki Parik

Shared January 3, 2016

Fascinating reading on one of the biggest mysteries for mankind

Peter Wang

Shared January 5, 2016

This is very interesting

vijay goyal

Shared January 9, 2016

excellent information

shakibkhan jony

Shared January 13, 2016

starry place on a reall

Jeshua Lin

Shared January 18, 2016

Frankly, learning either that we’re officially alone in the universe or that we’re officially joined by others would be creepy, which is a theme with all of the surreal storylines listed above—whatever the truth actually is, it’s mindblowing.

Troy Baker

Shared January 22, 2016

Aliens and Why we can't find them ?

Christopher Charles

Shared January 22, 2016

Mind blown 🌌😮💥

Degardin Arnaud

Shared February 6, 2016

Nous devrions déjà essayé colonisés par des intelligences extraterrestres Informatique type intelligence artificielle ou le ciel est-il un hologramme? fantastique théorie du paradoxe de Fermi..

David Gimpel

Shared February 9, 2016

Best read ever on the Fermi Paradox.

Marian Pitoniak

Shared February 11, 2016

Vycerpavajuci clanok :) Nejaku informacnu hodnotu ma, ale tato pasaz ma dostala: "...Thinking about this logically, I think we should disregard all the warnings get the outgoing signals rolling. If we catch the attention of super-advanced beings, yes, they might decide to wipe out our whole existence, but that’s not that different than our current fate (to each die within a century)..."
Riziko-averznym autor rozhodne nie je :D

Hannah Ellis

Shared February 14, 2016

Interesting

David H.

Shared February 23, 2016

Fascinating

julio sesar sanches lasso

Shared February 26, 2016

es increible no soi angeles la de tu salon y nuestro maestro es ruben agarre el correo electronico de mi papa

Rob van den Brand

Shared March 13, 2016

Is er buitenaards leven of niet? Lees hier wat de wetenschap er van zegt (ze zijn het allemaal oneens met elkaar)...plus mindblowing statistieken over zandkorrels en sterren. OK en nu snel naar buiten :)

Rob van den Brand

Shared March 13, 2016

Is er buitenaards leven of niet? Lees hier wat de wetenschap er van zegt (ze zijn het allemaal oneens met elkaar)...plus mindblowing statistieken over zandkorrels en sterren.

Adam Elisha

Shared March 14, 2016

Really neat read if you have some free time

future

Mohaç Özbayrı

Shared March 16, 2016

Yazıda geçen aşağıdaki kısım bayağı bir etkileyici...😧😧😧

"So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach"

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach.

Talia Havenaar

Shared March 21, 2016

so pretty

Luca Fauciglietti

Shared March 21, 2016

Of the idea of putting into context how many "Earth like planets" are just in the milky was think about all the reasons why we haven't yet met any other form of life similar to human kind.

Frankly, learning either that we’re officially alone in the universe or that we’re officially joined by others would be creepy, which is a theme with all of the surreal storylines listed above—whatever the truth actually is, it’s mindblowing

Joel K

Shared March 22, 2016

I absolutely love the idea of our universe being a simulation that some hyper intelligent beings are using to study us. Perhaps we are a recreation of them under different circumstances and are being studied alongside countless other variations of our (their) civilization. Maybe we're a child's toy. Given the raw probably that such intelligence must exist, who is to say that we aren't within a simulation of another simulation? Going up that way gives us even more room to play with in considering whether or not such intelligence might exist - there's all the probability of it in our universe, then all of the same in the next simulation up.. ad infinitum. Hell, perhaps in the next one up there are a bunch of other intelligences running sims of their own as well as whoever has ours going. Man... it sure is 3am.

Charley J

Shared March 29, 2016

Very Interesting🌌

Joseph Arshawsky

Shared March 31, 2016

I thought you'd like this.

Jonathan Blackburn

Shared April 3, 2016

Great

Andreas Saxkjær

Shared April 3, 2016

If you're interested in anything related to astronomy or just love to read about possible alien species out there in the universe, give this article a read!

Khufu Khufu

Shared April 8, 2016

Goed verhaal waarin de Fermi paradox wordt uitgelegd ...

Matt Lacy

Shared April 15, 2016

This is a fascinating read and blows your mind at the possibilities of life in the universe. I love stuff like this

Meenakshi Sundaram Hariharan

Shared April 22, 2016

could

Steve Gutierrez

Shared April 27, 2016

Very interesting topic!

Lukas Garcia

Shared April 29, 2016

This is why Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom says that “no news is good news.” The discovery of even simple life on Mars would be devastating, because it would cut out a number of potential Great Filters behind us. And if we were to find fossilized complex life on Mars, Bostrom says “it would be by far the worst news ever printed on a newspaper cover,” because it would mean The Great Filter is almost definitely ahead of us—ultimately dooming the species. Bostrom believes that when it comes to The Fermi Paradox, “the silence of the night sky is golden.”

ROWAN LARSON

Shared May 6, 2016

Intriguing...

Ana Maris

Shared May 6, 2016

well this should cover most questions about life on other planets

Goran Nyberg

Shared May 7, 2016

such

Howard Kim

Shared May 7, 2016

Very thorough and interesting

Huimin Lu

Shared May 8, 2016

This is interesting

Brad Ames

Shared May 9, 2016

Where are all of the other intelligent species in the universe?

Gustavo Vilas Boas

Shared May 16, 2016

Algumas boas explicações bem fundamentadas do porquê de estarmos sós no universo (ate

Gustavo Vilas Boas

Shared May 16, 2016

Algumas boas explicações fundamentadas racionalmente sobre o porquê de estarmos sós no universo (até o momento).

Nancy Rodriguez

Shared May 17, 2016

😱💫😱💫😱💫

Tim Price

Shared May 17, 2016

where is everybody?

natalie van zyl

Shared May 25, 2016

everybody should read this

Dorothea Hinrichs

Shared May 25, 2016

super interesting article on aliens and stuff

Bing Xu

Shared May 25, 2016

Perfect !!!

asemaneh4

Shared May 28, 2016

it s funny

Nandish Patel

Shared May 29, 2016

Very nice brilliant I liked as I am a space lover

Temple Clay

Shared June 10, 2016

You know when you hear about humans of the past debating whether the Earth was round or if the sun revolved around the Earth or thinking that lightning happened because of Zeus, and they seem so primitive and in the dark? That’s about where we are with this topic.

Audrey R

Shared June 13, 2016

for every grain of sand on every beach on Earth, there are 10,000 stars out there.

Audrey R

Shared June 13, 2016

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach.

Avijit Mondal

Shared June 19, 2016

Here's something to think about

Bill Hinkle

Shared June 21, 2016

The best explanation I've seen of why they're not out there (at least insofar as our development will let us perceive).

Daniel Howard

Shared June 23, 2016

Where is everyone?

Zachary Drummond

Shared June 25, 2016

Will we ever find Aliens? Are we going to leave Earth?

Brooke Rice

Shared June 25, 2016

loved this

Phil Moore

Shared June 25, 2016

amazing read

Kirk North

Shared June 28, 2016

Fascinating read about our cosmos and "where is everyone?"

Rob Sheppard

Shared June 28, 2016

"...we're probably not as smart as we think we are."

Zheng Fang

Shared July 5, 2016

There’s something called The Kardashev Scale, which helps us group intelligent civilizations into three broad categories by the amount of energy they use:

A Type I Civilization has the ability to use all of the energy on their planet. We’re not quite a Type I Civilization, but we’re close (Carl Sagan created a formula for this scale which puts us at a Type 0.7 Civilization).

A Type II Civilization can harness all of the energy of their host star. Our feeble Type I brains can hardly imagine how someone would do this, but we’ve tried our best, imagining things like a Dyson Sphere.



A Type III Civilization blows the other two away, accessing power comparable to that of the entire Milky Way galaxy.

Zheng Fang

Shared July 5, 2016

This something else is called The Great Filter.

The Great Filter theory says that at some point from pre-life to Type III intelligence, there’s a wall that all or nearly all attempts at life hit. There’s some stage in that long evolutionary process that is extremely unlikely or impossible for life to get beyond. That stage is The Great Filter.

Zheng Fang

Shared July 5, 2016

It turns out that when it comes to the fate of humankind, this question is very important. Depending on where The Great Filter occurs, we’re left with three possible realities: We’re rare, we’re first, or we’re fucked.

Zheng Fang

Shared July 5, 2016

While the leap from semi-intelligent life (chimps) to intelligent life (humans) doesn’t at first seem like a miraculous step, Steven Pinker rejects the ideaof an inevitable “climb upward” of evolution: “Since evolution does not strive for a goal but just happens, it uses the adaptation most useful for a given ecological niche, and the fact that, on Earth, this led to technological intelligence only once so far may suggest that this outcome of natural selection is rare and hence by no means a certain development of the evolution of a tree of life.”

Zheng Fang

Shared July 5, 2016

One possible future Great Filter is a regularly-occurring cataclysmic natural event, like the above-mentioned gamma-ray bursts, except they’re unfortunately not done yet and it’s just a matter of time before all life on Earth is suddenly wiped out by one. Another candidate is the possible inevitability that nearly all intelligent civilizations end up destroying themselves once a certain level of technology is reached.

This is why Oxford University philosopher Nick Bostrom says that “no news is good news.”

Sasha Rose Looby

Shared July 5, 2016

wow!!!

Eddie Black

Shared July 10, 2016

for every grain of sand on every beach on Earth, there are 10,000 stars out there.

John Fial

Shared July 14, 2016

Bostrom believes that when it comes to The Fermi Paradox, “the silence of the night sky is golden.”

Immo Brooks

Shared July 17, 2016

Fascinating read on the existence of aliens and what it means.

Neil Maxfield

Shared July 23, 2016

Absolutely fascinating stuff this

Cheam Baker

Shared August 2, 2016

Great thought experiment

Тимофей Петров

Shared August 8, 2016

Some people stick with the traditional, feeling struck by the epic beauty or blown away by the insane scale of the universe. Personally, I go for the old “existential meltdown followed by acting weird for the next half hour.” But everyone feels something.

Choong Kong Lee

Shared August 11, 2016

ftztrtxtshv

marion fux

Shared August 12, 2016

read this is great!

Angel Hendrickson

Shared August 16, 2016

Worth the read

Nikhil Sharma

Shared August 18, 2016

Intriguing!

Timothy Cross

Shared August 20, 2016

So I'm up at 4 in the morning because I can't sleep and so I read this article... and now I'm up at 4:20 and can't sleep because I read THIS article. Being the religious type that I am, I'm thinking "If Group 1 is right and we're all alone in the universe, then doesn't that support the idea of a God who made us uniquely in His image? And if Group 2 is right and there can be beings so advanced we can't even comprehend their existence, then doesn't that support the idea of a universal Creator so advanced we can't even comprehend His existence?"

So yeah ... no idea what I'm talking about? Read this article. Just don't do it if you're trying to fall asleep at 4 in the morning! 😪

Timothy Cross

Shared August 20, 2016

So I'm up at 4 in the morning and can't sleep so I read this article and now I'm up at 4:20 and can't sleep because I read THIS article. So I'm the religious type (you might have guessed), and so now I'm thinking, "Okay if Group 1 is right and we're alone in the universe then doesn't that support the idea of a God who made us uniquely in His image and likeness? And if Group 2 is right and there are beings so advanced we can't even comprehend their existence, then doesn't that support the idea of a supreme Creator who is so beyond us that we can't even comprehend His existence?"

No idea what I'm talking about? Then, yeah ... go ahead and read this article. Just don't do it if you're trying to fall asleep at 4 in the morning! 😪

Christopher Hoffman

Shared August 21, 2016

Check it out...

Sean Cobb

Shared August 24, 2016

On the new #proximab light, here's an awesome article on why this ever lasting search for life might be in vain

Simas Česnauskas

Shared August 25, 2016

An interesting insight...

А Па

Shared August 25, 2016

paa69794@gmail.com

Ana Luíza Cidral

Shared August 30, 2016

“the newest children in a strange and uncertain cosmos should listen quietly for a long time, patiently learning about the universe and comparing notes, before shouting into an unknown jungle that we do not understand.”

Aleeshia Hittaller

Shared September 10, 2016

So there are 100 Earth-like planets for every grain of sand in the world. Think about that next time you’re on the beach.

Michael Park

Shared September 11, 2016

Mind-blowing read!

Otto Cedeno

Shared September 19, 2016

awesome article

Ryan Hayes

Shared September 24, 2016

So so good

Jess O'Neill

Shared October 2, 2016

Idk, just: wbw

Nimit Kumar

Shared October 4, 2016

Interesting read

Eva Godina

Shared October 6, 2016

intelligent

Evvian

Shared October 7, 2016

Really quite an interesting page about the Fermi Paradox

Kingsley Dr Okpalaeke

Shared December 22, 2016

I really enjoyed reading this article.

greenoak

Shared January 19, 2017

So it’s not that we can’t pick up the signals from Planet X using our technology, it’s that we can’t even comprehend what the beings from Planet X are or what they’re trying to do. It’s so beyond us that even if they really wanted to enlighten us, it would be like trying to teach ants about the internet

Joeri Möller

Shared March 21, 2017

It's a rather tough read but try to stick with it and it becomes unbelievably interesting.

Behrouz Aftabi

Shared May 9, 2017

awsome!

Daniel Montenegro

Shared December 4, 2017

Great reading!

Shimaa Abd-Allah

Shared December 14, 2017

Lexie

Shared December 28, 2017

Some people stick with the traditional, feeling struck by the epic beauty or blown away by the insane scale of the universe. Personally, I go for the old “existential meltdown followed by acting weird for the next half hour.” But everyone feels something.

Rob H

Shared July 2, 2018

Civilizations

Captain Dan

Shared November 26, 2015

Why haven't we discovered aliens yet...

francisco perez

Shared March 11, 2017

BRILLIANT MIND.

Brian Milligan

Shared December 15, 2015

Very scary, but extremely interesting. Next to "Why is there anything?", "Where is everybody?" is probably the most relevant question for life on earth. If we have already crossed the great filter, we are laughing, but if the great filter lies somewhere in the future, we all have reason to be very afraid. It's also a very well-written article.

amber love

Shared November 26, 2017

Shawn Love

Ingvar Steffensen

Shared December 27, 2017

Need some perspective? A humbling lesson? Or just a brief existential crisis? This is it!

Johnaten Draken Brown

Shared January 21, 2018

Valóban egyedül vagyunk?
Nincsenek űrlények sem Ufók?

Kevin Jauregui

Shared June 18, 2018

There’s even a chance that we’re all part of a computer simulation by some researcher from another world, and other forms of life simply weren’t programmed into the simulation.

Kevin Jauregui

Shared June 18, 2018

Beyond its shocking science fiction component, The Fermi Paradox also leaves me with a deep humbling. Not just the normal “Oh yeah, I’m microscopic and my existence lasts for three seconds” humbling that the universe always triggers. The Fermi Paradox brings out a sharper, more personal humbling, one that can only happen after spending hours of research hearing your species’ most renowned scientists present insane theories, change their minds again and again, and wildly contradict each other—reminding us that future generations will look at us the same way we see the ancient people who were sure that the stars were the underside of the dome of heaven, and they’ll think “Wow they really had no idea what was going on.”