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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Jacob Rogelberg

Shared December 28, 2016

Tom Stafford describes a cure for this that we can apply to career clarity: Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?” And the same goes for career opportunities. We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

Matouš Vinš

Shared September 24, 2017

Big topic for me during the last few months

Lane Rettig

Shared April 1, 2017

Few appear to have the courage to live this principle, which may be why it differentiates successful people and organizations from the very successful ones.

Abhilash Pattnaik

Shared January 24, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well. Few appear to have the courage to live this principle, which may be why it differentiates successful people and organizations from the very successful ones

Laszlo Vad

Shared February 13, 2017

Why don’t successful people and organizations automatically become very successful? One important explanation is due to what I call “the clarity paradox,” which can be summed up in four predictable phases:

Phase 1: When we really have clarity of purpose, it leads to success.
Phase 2: When we have success, it leads to more options and opportunities.
Phase 3: When we have increased options and opportunities, it leads to diffused efforts.
Phase 4: Diffused efforts undermine the very clarity that led to our success in the first place.

Matt Kushin, Ph.D.

Shared January 19, 2017

This is so important and something I am working toward and struggling with.

Sai krishna V K

Shared June 6, 2017

This must be re-read from time to time.

Johann Richard

Shared March 25, 2016

The clarity paradox.

Curiously, and overstating the point in order to make it, success is a catalyst for failure.

Seamus Cushley

Shared March 2, 2017

An interesting perspective on how success presents many new opportunities, that without disciplined pruning could lead to failure.

Seamus.

Parth Bhakta

Shared June 15, 2017

Conducting a life audit. All human systems tilt towards messiness. In the same way that our desks get cluttered without us ever trying to make them cluttered, so our lives get cluttered as well-intended ideas from the past pile up. Most of these efforts didn’t come with an expiration date. Once adopted, they live on in perpetuity. Figure out which ideas from the past are important and pursue those. Throw out the rest.

Parth Bhakta

Shared June 15, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well.

Craig Bailey

Shared December 31, 2016

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well. Few appear to have the courage to live this principle, which may be why it differentiates successful people and organizations from the very successful ones.

Florence Shaffer

Shared January 31, 2017

Tom Stafford describes a cure for this that we can apply to career clarity: Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?” And the same goes for career opportunities. We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

Andy Berkheimer

Shared August 21, 2017

Good advice on the battle against inertia.

We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

BJ Johnson

Shared April 13, 2017

"If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less."

Alexis Sukrieh

Shared August 8, 2017

The clarity paradox : Success is a catalyst for failure.

Axel Marazzi

Shared June 19, 2017

Por qué muchas veces triunfar te lleva al fracaso.

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well. Few appear to have the courage to live this principle, which may be why it differentiates successful people and organizations from the very successful ones.

Cristian Gog

Shared January 4, 2017

Destul de simplu, nu?

Whitney Zimmerman

Shared May 27, 2017

"Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials."

Lisa Liu

Shared December 29, 2016

A good set of actionable tips to do less and achieve more in our careers and go from successful to very successful.

Ashleigh Teo

Shared January 5, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials.

Ashleigh Teo

Shared January 21, 2017

Application to career clarity: Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?” And the same goes for career opportunities. We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

richard lagrand

Shared October 20, 2017

Happyness is at the intersection of what you know (talent), what you love (passion), and what people need (market) #startuplife

Himanshu Gupta

Shared January 9, 2017

All human systems tilt towards messiness. In the same way that our desks get cluttered without us ever trying to make them cluttered, so our lives get cluttered as well-intended ideas from the past pile up. Most of these efforts didn’t come with an expiration date. Once adopted, they live on in perpetuity. Figure out which ideas from the past are important and pursue those. Throw out the rest.

Tom Stafford describes a cure for this that we can apply to career clarity: Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?” And the same goes for career opportunities. We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

Cris

Shared December 20, 2016

A veces nos hacemos la pregunta incorrecta para seguir avanzando.

Veronika Losova

Shared April 5, 2017

Decluttering your personal and professional life

Navnath Raut

Shared June 12, 2017

Absolutely worth your time.

Jamie Humes

Shared December 27, 2016

Note to Self:
Determine what is essential & then eliminate the rest.
Focus | Reduce | Simplify

Stacie Mahuna

Shared January 17, 2017

"We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

Lanakin Dogwalker

Shared February 13, 2017

Good plan for clear movement forward.

Paul Dariye

Shared March 2, 2017

Ill-defined success is also a catalyst for failure.

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less

Darien Gabriel

Shared May 14, 2017

Wisdom

Yew Leung Lee

Shared September 3, 2017

my life needs this. more focus on an age of constant distraction and unlimited opportunities

Tim Cox

Shared October 9, 2017

Eliminating an old activity before you add a new one. This simple rule ensures that you don’t add an activity that is less valuable than something you are already doing

Tim Cox

Shared October 9, 2017

Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?” And the same goes for career opportunities. We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

Ricardo Fahrig

Shared February 12, 2017

"success is a catalyst for failure."

Mukhtar Ahmed

Shared May 4, 2017

says it all...

Brian Fang

Shared July 7, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less.

André Kano

Shared July 9, 2017

Part of the essentials

Clive Richards

Shared January 17, 2017

Success can be a catalyst for failure!

Rayon Rashid

Shared March 21, 2017

When You Realise Where You Belong

Gustavo Lemos

Shared June 29, 2017

This is the meaning of success

Josh Coe

Shared September 30, 2017

Pursuing as little as possible from now on.

Daniel Ebeling

Shared June 22, 2017

Success breeds failure. Some kind of paradox.

Fang Wan

Shared March 8, 2016

First, use more extreme criteria. Think of what happens to our closets when we use the broad criteria: “Is there a chance that I will wear this someday in the future?” The closet becomes cluttered with clothes we rarely wear. If we ask, “Do I absolutely love this?” then we will be able to eliminate the clutter and have space for something better. We can do the same with our career choices.

Fang Wan

Shared March 8, 2016

The Endowment effect -- you tend to overvalue what you own

If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?” And the same goes for career opportunities. We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

Ryan Pramberg

Shared January 7, 2017

5 minute read to get rid of clutter in life

Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?” And the same goes for career opportunities. We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

evan james

Shared January 10, 2017

success is a catalyst for failure.

Maiiimaa nya

Shared February 10, 2017

"“What am I deeply passionate about?” and “What taps my talent?” and “What meets a significant need in the world?” Naturally there won’t be as many pages to view, but that is the point of the exercise. We aren’t looking for a plethora of good things to do. We are looking for our absolute highest point of contribution."

Bhanu Shrestha

Shared March 10, 2017

"success is a catalyst for failure."

Magnus Reuter

Shared March 25, 2017

Lifechanging truths

alexander v. morea

Shared March 31, 2017

de-naturalising the word: success.

M J

Shared April 14, 2017

@lar003 think you'll enjoy and apply this

Kristia van Heerden

Shared June 9, 2017

Am important hack for decluttering: Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?”

Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?”

DEEPAK SEHRAWAT

Shared June 12, 2017

Whao.

Tom Stafford describes a cure for this that we can apply to career clarity: Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?” And the same goes for career opportunities. We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

Gergely Gurmai

Shared June 14, 2017

Great post!

vaibhav padmakar munjole

Shared June 22, 2017

a!xuu765y*yyu\^\86¢~[67867$*%#4¢¢^¢\\^\^¢\^

Mark Michael

Shared September 16, 2017

"If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the 'undisciplined pursuit of more,' then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less."

mohammed ahmed

Shared October 17, 2017

This formula is missing the element of conscience.

Jason Chua

Shared November 3, 2017

Less is more.

Junaidy Jumat

Shared December 2, 2017

The three things to consider for us to find our purpose

Caro Knaepen

Shared December 18, 2016

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials.

Lakshmi Manjunath

Shared December 20, 2016

Disciplined Pursuit of Less

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less.

Devon

Shared January 1, 2017

The mere fact of ownership made them less willing to part with their own objects. As a simple illustration in your own life, think of how a book on your shelf that you haven’t used in years seems to increase in value the moment you think about giving it away.

Marissa Karpack

Shared January 7, 2017

We aren’t looking for a plethora of good things to do. We are looking for our absolute highest point of contribution.

Seth Shaffer

Shared January 7, 2017

this was an enjoyable read and added understanding and depth to the best ways I can make a decision.

Jamie Samonte

Shared January 9, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well. Few appear to have the courage to live this principle, which may be why it differentiates successful people and organizations from the very successful ones.

Eric O. LEBIGOT

Shared January 22, 2017

we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?”

Senya Lopukhin

Shared January 25, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well.

Yenyi Fu

Shared January 27, 2017

main point of article

Curiously, and overstating the point in order to make it, success is a catalyst for failure.

Jenna Christopherson

Shared January 21, 2017

You can apply this to nearly every part of your life. I've seen people destroy great things in their life in order to pursue more.

They gave up a great relationship to pursue many experiences with women.

They gave up having a few beautiful objects in great shape in order to hold onto everything they could.

I've known people who lost their soul-mate in the pursuit of something better.

The two things all these people had was the pursuit of more and the destruction of what they had.

Nolan Cunningham

Shared February 1, 2017

Declutter and prioritize to pare down your career options

Lynn Buckway

Shared February 9, 2017

Yesssss!

A. Lim

Shared February 9, 2017

Success is a catalyst of failure.

Akmal Mugiwara

Shared February 23, 2017

Great piece. A truth that we always avoid to assent.

Faheemah

Shared March 12, 2017

Less is more. Focus and stay focused! I love the bit about the Endowment Theory... how we suddenly value things more when we think of giving them away but before that, they actually mean nothing to us. Really puts the richness of life into perspective... count what counts!

John Morris

Shared March 17, 2017

This could either be a powerful read for my students in the career-focused class, BA 353, or a life lesson for me...

Boaz Galil

Shared April 1, 2017

Super interesting

vishakha khanolkar

Shared April 19, 2017

success leads to failure. read WHOLE to know why.........🎖

Miguel Olivo

Shared May 2, 2017

Diffused efforts undermine the very clarity that led to our success in the first place.

Magic Real

Shared May 27, 2017

It's kind le interesting

Sunil Paul

Shared May 31, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less.

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

Jim Collins explored this phenomenon and found that one of the key reasons for these failures was that companies fell into “the undisciplined pursuit of more.” It is true for companies and it is true for careers.

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

The price of his dream job was saying no to the many good, parallel paths he encountered.

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

ask three questions: “What am I deeply passionate about?” and “What taps my talent?” and “What meets a significant need in the world?” Naturally there won’t be as many pages to view, but that is the point of the exercise. We aren’t looking for a plethora of good things to do. We are looking for our absolute highest point of contribution.

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

Conducting a life audit. All human systems tilt towards messiness. In the same way that our desks get cluttered without us ever trying to make them cluttered, so our lives get cluttered as well-intended ideas from the past pile up. Most of these efforts didn’t come with an expiration date. Once adopted, they live on in perpetuity. Figure out which ideas from the past are important and pursue those. Throw out the rest.
Eliminating an old activity before you add a new one. This simple rule ensures that you don’t add an activity that is less valuable than something you are already doing.

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

beware of the endowment effect.

think of how a book on your shelf that you haven’t used in years seems to increase in value the moment you think about giving it away.

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well. Few appear to have the courage to live this principle, which may be why it differentiates successful people and organizations from the very successful ones.

John Valhalla

Shared June 8, 2017

Now days more than ever

Ricky Jason

Shared June 17, 2017

Great read! It provided a different pursuit perspective.

Nikhil Dokania

Shared June 19, 2017

What separates the successful people from the very successful?

Nata Minnie

Shared July 8, 2017

purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials.

Ina Nocheseda

Shared August 5, 2017

success.

Paul Eden

Shared August 12, 2017

This

Duncan Sweeney

Shared August 26, 2017

Interesting short read, give it a go.

Nafissah Chattun

Shared October 1, 2017

Great article!

Michael Stebner

Shared October 6, 2017

Something worth considering...

Colin Fussner

Shared October 9, 2017

Less = More

H Tsang

Shared October 9, 2017

We aren’t looking for a plethora of good things to do. We are looking for our absolute highest point of contribution.

H Tsang

Shared October 9, 2017

Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?”

H Tsang

Shared October 9, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials.

barry quinn

Shared October 11, 2017

Excellent advice, especially to succeed in the distracting nature of academia

Ahamdi Okpara

Shared October 17, 2017

Good article!

Mayukha Avasarala

Shared November 1, 2017

A lesson in identifying what’s absolutely necessary

Sitt Guruvanich

Shared November 15, 2017

success is a catalyst for failure.

Marc Luanghy

Shared November 18, 2017

A must read on self reflection and personal development

Rafael Castro

Shared November 23, 2017

Less is more! Interesting reading!

Bongani Sayed

Shared November 28, 2017

this is the key to job suitability

Purvi Jain

Shared December 4, 2017

success is a catalyst for failure.

Craig Bovis

Shared February 20, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less. Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well. Few appear to have the courage to live this principle, which may be why it differentiates successful people and organizations from the very successful ones.

Ary Wicaksana

Shared May 14, 2017

Instead, we can conduct an advanced search and ask three questions: “What am I deeply passionate about?” and “What taps my talent?” and “What meets a significant need in the world?”

Ary Wicaksana

Shared May 14, 2017

Tom Stafford describes a cure for this that we can apply to career clarity: Instead of asking, “How much do I value this item?” we should ask “If I did not own this item, how much would I pay to obtain it?” And the same goes for career opportunities. We shouldn’t ask, “How much do I value this opportunity?” but “If I did not have this opportunity, how much would I be willing to sacrifice in order to obtain it?”

Ary Wicaksana

Shared May 14, 2017

Not just haphazardly saying no, but purposefully, deliberately, and strategically eliminating the nonessentials. Not just once a year as part of a planning meeting, but constantly reducing, focusing and simplifying. Not just getting rid of the obvious time wasters, but being willing to cut out really terrific opportunities as well.

Daniel Blut

Shared June 7, 2017

is success a catalyst for failure?

Anton Perez

Shared August 6, 2017

If success is a catalyst for failure because it leads to the “undisciplined pursuit of more,” then one simple antidote is the disciplined pursuit of less.