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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Jeremy Cabral

Shared December 29, 2016

Definitely agree with the point that 'update meetings' are a waste of time. Instead, sending the update ahead of time and changing the meeting to focus on feedback/critique could be a better time investment

Shayon Pal

Shared May 18, 2017

For people who feel too put on the spot, you can talk to them ahead of time and tell them that you’re hoping they’ll contribute. That way, they’ll have time to plan what they’ll say. Then in the meeting, you may still need to ask for their perspective but they’ll be primed to do so.

sathish R

Shared December 18, 2016

to

Hanspeter Männicke

Shared January 6, 2017

kurz und im stehen. Gute Idee. :)

Kan Tejada

Shared December 17, 2016

"If you’re only meeting to transfer information, rethink your approach. Why take up valuable time saying something you can just email?"

M Sandoval

Shared April 13, 2017

Please!

Shailendra Paliwal

Shared January 8, 2017

I can't choose between if this particular listicle is terrible or is it the common faff that runs in management articles?

Rule #1: Keep it small, but wait if have a large meeting that's fine too.
Rule #2: Devices are bad, but wait if you really want to use them that's fine too
Rule #3: Keep it short, but wait if it's not short that's fine too!

Giles Whiting

Shared March 16, 2017

Put these principles in place and stick to 'em!!

Aaron Booker

Shared June 27, 2017

might be worth researching for Varvid meetings?

Andre Buser

Shared January 18, 2016

Axtell and Francesca Gino, a professor at Harvard Business School and the author of Sidetracked: Why Our Decisions Get Derailed, and How We Can Stick to the Plan whether much of the conventional wisdom holds true.

Lance T.

Shared February 14, 2017

“Never hold a meeting just to update people.”

Greg Chittim

Shared May 13, 2017

Great points all around. Especially the no devices (maybe one person who is a designated note-taker) and no meetings just to provide updates.

Kelly MacLean

Shared January 18, 2017

The dangers of multitasking

In fact, studies show that a person who is attempting to multitask takes 50% longer to accomplish a task and he or she makes up to 50% more mistakes.”

Kelly MacLean

Shared January 18, 2017

So many updates during staff meetings that could be emailed instead!!

JSPDR

Shared February 21, 2017

Very nice article

JSPDR

Shared February 21, 2017

Very usefyl

Sam Sutton

Shared June 22, 2017

Some great advice in here, especially the bit about keeping meetings to less than an hour.

David Geisler

Shared December 29, 2015

Lots of articles out there about this, but this one is a really good one.

Pirmin Schuermann

Shared January 1, 2017

In a group of 20 or more, you can’t keep track of the subtle cues you need to pick up,” says Axtell. And if you want people to have the opportunity to contribute, you need to limit attendance.

Pirmin Schuermann

Shared January 1, 2017

The challenge with large meetings isn’t just that everyone won’t have a chance to talk, but many of them won’t feel the need to.

Pirmin Schuermann

Shared January 1, 2017

The second reason to ban devices is that they distract others

Pirmin Schuermann

Shared January 1, 2017

Stand-up meetings are more productive

Pirmin Schuermann

Shared January 1, 2017

Make sure everyone participates and cold-call those who don’t.”

Some people may want to speak up but don’t feel like they can unless they’re asked

Pirmin Schuermann

Shared January 1, 2017

“just by asking people in the meeting for their opinion, you’re going to raise their commitment to the issues being discussed.”

Pirmin Schuermann

Shared January 1, 2017

“Never hold a meeting just to update people.”

“If you’re already meeting for worthwhile topics, you can do a quick update,”

Pirmin Schuermann

Shared January 1, 2017

Always set an agenda out ahead of time – and be clear about the purpose of the meeting.

Ludek Slegr

Shared April 28, 2017

The principles mentioned in the article resonate with what we experience regarding meetings on regular basis. It should not be that dificult to change the daily practice after all.

Joseph Leopard

Shared December 15, 2015

Some good practical tips on running meetings.

Mohit Verma

Shared December 21, 2016

“In fact, studies show that a person who is attempting to multitask takes 50% longer to accomplish a task and he or she makes up to 50% more mistakes

lsaffie

Shared January 14, 2017

1. “Keep the meeting as small as possible. No more than seven people.”

lsaffie

Shared January 14, 2017

2. “Ban devices.”

lsaffie

Shared January 14, 2017

3. “Keep it as short as possible — no longer than an hour.”

lsaffie

Shared January 14, 2017

4. “Stand-up meetings are more productive.”

lsaffie

Shared January 14, 2017

5. “Make sure everyone participates and cold-call those who don’t.”

lsaffie

Shared January 14, 2017

6. “Never hold a meeting just to update people.”

lsaffie

Shared January 14, 2017

update meetings aren’t just time-wasters. Gino explains that research by Roy Baumeister, Kathleen Vohs and their colleagues suggests that we have a limited amount of what they call “executive” resources. “Once they get depleted, we make bad decisions or choices,”

lsaffie

Shared January 14, 2017

7. “Always set an agenda out ahead of time – and be clear about the purpose of the meeting.”

Nels GRE

Shared January 23, 2017

yeah

Therese Fairbrother

Shared February 9, 2017

Some good ideas ... I'm experimenting here ...Want to post from my business page

Garry Bamrah

Shared March 23, 2017

U

Mara Chan

Shared April 1, 2017

"Always set an agenda out ahead of time – and be clear about the purpose of the meeting."

eben olu

Shared June 7, 2017

To the Bosses

Coco Dumato

Shared June 20, 2017

The people who hold back often have the best perspective on the conversation and definitely need to be drawn out.

Kaushik Pattabiraman

Shared June 29, 2017

We know these things happens on a daily basis but putting together gives a very good picture

Michael Greene

Shared March 11, 2017

Interesting quote saved for later. Notes for context here?

Business meetings require people to commit, focus, and make decisions, with little or no attention paid to the depletion of the finite cognitive resources of the participants — particularly if the meetings are long or too frequent