Beta
Must Read on Pocket

This is one of the most-saved, read, and shared stories on Pocket.

Recommendations from Pocket Users

Andrew Thappa

Shared December 3, 2017

I do think 1994 was an inflection point for soccer in the US. But it's clear that we're still emphasizing physicality over technique which is always going to be a losing proposition.

Yum Mannas Papi

Shared May 21, 2018

hey I love the way you shout

Vincent Zhang

Shared March 2, 2017

I miss the summer so much!

tuyet le

Shared May 12, 2017

the halftime whistle, the Americans got a free kick opportunity of their own from 30 yards away.

WYNALDA: I knew there

Cayden Schaefer

Shared May 12, 2017

Soccer

Shahnoza Amonova

Shared January 14, 2018

PAUL CALIGIURI, defender: U.S. Soccer and Bora did a good job of bringing in a lot of players into the process, but at the same time keeping the core players together to create the continuity that was needed.

MARCELO BALBOA, defender: For most of us, that's all we had. A lot of us were not playing professional soccer in Europe at the time, so this was basically our professional team.

WE TRAINED TWICE A DAY, MORNING AND AFTERNOON, AND THEN THE FEDERATION WOULD TRY TO GET AS MANY FRIENDLIES AS POSSIBLE.

LALAS: We were on monthly contracts, so you could get fired at any time, and they paid for your apartment and you got some stipend or whatever it was. We weren't making that much money, but that was fine by me.

MIKE SORBER, midfielder: We trained twice a day, morning and afternoon, and then the federation would try to get as many friendlies as possible. It was all geared toward getting us prepared for competing against the best teams in the world.

TONY MEOLA, goalkeeper: I don't know the number of teams we played in that year-and-a-half, but it sure was a lot, it sure was a lot of traveling. I think that year, 1993, we were on the road over 250 days that year with Bora.

Trupesh Gondaliya

Shared May 9, 2018

superb