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Adam Braun

Shared November 26, 2015

Essential leadership reading.

Natalie Ebel

Shared December 16, 2015

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Callie Schweitzer

Shared November 28, 2015

"The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for."

Diego Mendes

Shared December 1, 2015

Leadership = Guidance

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Amit Gupta

Shared December 25, 2015

“Finally, Sheryl [Sandberg] said, ‘You know, Kim, I can tell I'm not really getting through to you. I'm going to have to be clearer here. When you say um every third word, it makes you sound stupid.’”

Daniel Burka

Shared November 4, 2016

“Part of the reason Sheryl was able to say to me so bluntly, ‘You sounded stupid,’ was that I knew that she cared personally about me.

Laura Roeder

Shared December 10, 2015

If the vertical axis is caring personally and the horizontal axis is challenging directly, you want your feedback to fall in the upper right-hand quadrant. That’s where radical candor lies.

Alexander Solovyov

Shared June 16, 2016

It's hard to start, but it seems like a necessity.

Sar Haribhakti

Shared November 6, 2016

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Amanda Root

Shared December 13, 2015

I absolutely love that Sheryl Sandberg anecdote no matter how many times I read it. +1 for radical candor as a boss. So good! Loved the whole article!

Caleb Ebel

Shared December 14, 2015

To help teach radical candor — this all-important but often neglected skill — to her own teams, Scott boiled it down to a simple framework: Picture a basic graph divided into four quadrants. If the vertical axis is caring personally and the horizontal axis is challenging directly, you want your feedback to fall in the upper right-hand quadrant. That’s where radical candor lies.

Aida Boucheron

Shared November 29, 2015

A refreshing read on leadership.

Cristel De Rouvray

Shared November 5, 2016

This is useful -

Olli Sulopuisto

Shared December 16, 2016

“John Stuart Mill explains it very well. He said, ‘The source of everything respectable in man, either as an intellectual or as a moral being, is that his errors are corrigible.’ The whole strength and value of human judgment depends on the one property that it can be set right when it is wrong.’

Rohan Light

Shared December 27, 2015

Challenging others follows challenging the self

Challenging others is difficult for many people; saying anything short of positive feels impolite

Aitor Calero

Shared November 10, 2016

I would argue that criticizing your employees when they screw up is not just your job, it's actually your moral obligation.

elena benito

Shared December 13, 2015

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

Andy McIlwain

Shared November 9, 2016

I would argue that criticizing your employees when they screw up is not just your job, it's actually your moral obligation.

Jason Dunn

Shared January 30, 2017

Candor is a rare and precious thing. If you manage anyone PLEASE read this.

Circuitry Chatarra

Shared October 16, 2016

"The source of everything respectable in man, either as an intellectual or as a moral being, is that his errors are corrigible.’ The whole strength and value of human judgment depends on the one property that it can be set right when it is wrong.’ You have to tell people when you think they're wrong or their work isn’t good enough."

Justin Roth

Shared December 21, 2015

Radical candor, then, results from a combination of caring personally and challenging directly.

Seyed Rasoul Jabari

Shared December 21, 2015

bosses need to tell employees when they're screwing up.

Vivek George

Shared November 28, 2015

A must for any leader/manager to read!

Kristinn Árni Lár Hróbjartsson

Shared March 11, 2016

Basic stuff but very important. great read. Easier to think than do.

Patrick Marsh

Shared December 21, 2015

Another good one. I learned a couple things myself and will be putting this into practice.

Martin Soler

Shared August 31, 2016

Candor is the one thing that will make or break a great team and there just isn't a shortcut to it.

The source of everything respectable in man, either as an intellectual or as a moral being, is that his errors are corrigible.’

Julien Schléret

Shared December 28, 2015

It sounds so simple to say that bosses need to tell employees when they're screwing up. But it very rarely happens.

Vsevolod Solovyov

Shared February 28, 2016

О том, как правильно давать фидбек

Jonathan Bates

Shared November 24, 2016

excellent

Nick Lenten

Shared August 26, 2017

Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears.

Chris Wren

Shared January 11, 2016

Great advice on how to help your coworkers with guidance.

Amit Panchal

Shared January 17, 2016

I would argue that criticizing your employees when they screw up is not just your job, it's actually your moral obligation.

Jemar Souza

Shared November 29, 2015

Good Read // Radical Candor — The Surprising Secret to Being a Good Boss

Janco Wolmarans

Shared December 26, 2015

It's all about feedback.

Zdenek Farana

Shared January 30, 2017

I would argue that criticizing your employees when they screw up is not just your job, it's actually your moral obligation.

Brendan Flynn

Shared March 15, 2017

Good read on management of people. It took me many years to become a manager who could consistently give proper feedback so I can getting the most from my team. The author distills the many virtues of being a good manager in easy to follow lessons.

Joel Bez

Shared January 19, 2016

Good article on giving advice/feedback

Rapha Vasconcellos

Shared November 7, 2016

The vision we have for giving guidance to our teams here at Facebook.

Arianne Foulks

Shared January 27, 2017

If you manage employees, you'll want to read this!

Adonai Hm

Shared January 30, 2017

Radical candor: Food for thought on a successful management approach

Pantelis K.

Shared November 22, 2016

“Caring personally makes it much easier to do the next thing you have to do as a good boss, which is being willing to piss people off.”

Rishabh Bhargava

Shared February 12, 2017

This is a great framework for interactions with people in general: definitely great at the workplace, but also for a bunch of my personal relationships.

Andy Berkheimer

Shared December 20, 2015

I wouldn't call it surprising, but this is solid advice. There is a great follow-up discussion to have after reading: if you are in one of the other quadrants, how do you transition your team to expect radical candor?

Mike Case

Shared December 30, 2015

No hedging no hesitating—your job is to be clear and to communicate.

Adam Waselnuk

Shared March 30, 2016

Great read about providing guidance as a leader.

Danielle Morris

Shared January 11, 2017

Radical candor, then, results from a combination of caring personally and challenging directly. But what does it look like in practice? Scott has created an acronym to help people remember:

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

Marlon Rodrigues

Shared April 24, 2017

"The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for."

Marlon Rodrigues

Shared April 24, 2017

"HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” "

Mark John Buenconsejo

Shared December 10, 2015

Good perspective on leadership.

Viktor Voronin

Shared February 25, 2016

On my own I want to add that direct communication contributes to the mental health of a company.

Adam Legge

Shared April 13, 2017

We all need to be more honest bosses

Alexandra Haass

Shared December 19, 2015

“Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.”

Perry Swergold

Shared January 22, 2017

Sound leadership advice for professionals

Andy Hugelier

Shared December 21, 2015

This hit home with me in so many ways. Trying to be friends or polite instead of brutally honest with your team is one of the most unintentionally harmful things you can do.

Ryan Sauer

Shared September 10, 2016

This is changing my business every day

Jassim Ali

Shared November 5, 2016

great read !

Kavit Haria

Shared November 19, 2016

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Max Euler

Shared January 3, 2016


Godiva Golding

Shared January 7, 2017

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Godiva Golding

Shared January 7, 2017

But after the meeting, Scott’s boss, Sheryl Sandberg, suggested they take a walk together. She talked about the things she’d liked about the presentation and how impressed she was with the success the team was having — yet Scott could feel a “but” coming. “Finally she said, ‘But you said um a lot.’ And I thought, ‘Oh, no big deal. I know, I do that. But who cared if I said um when I had the tiger by the tail?’”

Sandberg pushed forward, asking whether Scott’s ums were the result of nervousness. She even suggested that Google could hire a speaking coach to help. Still, Scott brushed off the concern; it didn’t seem like an important issue. “Finally, Sheryl said, ‘You know, Kim, I can tell I'm not really getting through to you. I'm going to have to be clearer here. When you say um every third word, it makes you sound stupid.’”

“Now, that got my attention!” Scott says.

Godiva Golding

Shared January 8, 2017

Put your own oxygen mask on first.

There’s a reason you hear this every time you board a plane — it’s good advice. “You can't possibly give a damn about other people if you don't give a damn about yourself. At one point, when I was having a very stressful period in my career, I realized that the most important thing I could do for my team was not hire great people. It was not to raise a lot of money. It was actually to take a run every morning,” Scott says.

She got pretty religious about it, running around the reservoir near her New York apartment every morning. Then one day, during a particularly difficult time at work, there was a big storm, lightning, hail and all. She thought about bailing, but quickly reconsidered and laced up her shoes. Scott had learned to take her commitments to herself as seriously as any other professional responsibility.

“There were usually hundreds of people running around the reservoir, but there was just one other nut out there that morning. As I got closer to him, I realized it was my co-founder," she says. "A lot of things were going wrong, but we were doing something right.”

Asha Herten

Shared January 15, 2017

Definitely fall into the "ruinous empathy" space myself...

Alya Adamany Woods

Shared February 3, 2017

#practiceradicalcandor

Veronika Losova

Shared March 24, 2017

#management #leadership #feedback

Godiva Golding

Shared May 5, 2017

"The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for."

Gil Doron

Shared September 25, 2017

Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Gil Doron

Shared September 25, 2017

John Stuart Mill explains it very well. He said, ‘The source of everything respectable in man, either as an intellectual or as a moral being, is that his errors are corrigible.’ The whole strength and value of human judgment depends on the one property that it can be set right when it is wrong.’ You have to tell people when you think they're wrong or their work isn’t good enough,” Scott says.

Michel Tofahrn

Shared December 25, 2015

right.”

Eric Ishii-Eckhardt

Shared January 17, 2016

If you can't offer radical candor, the second best thing you can do is be an asshole.

Rebecca Harris

Shared January 17, 2016

A leadership practice we have at Harris Creek is "Speak with Candor" that echoes this sentiment. This is so vital to any healthy work environment.

Giuseppe Bottacin

Shared October 24, 2016

I've grown up without being told "if you don't have anything nice to say, then shut up". Maybe that's why I find this article so right.

Peter Cammarano

Shared October 27, 2016

Might be a beautiful unpacking of healthy red (Birkman Colors) communication style.

Kieran Rheaume

Shared March 15, 2017

I've made a note to regularly come back and re-read this

Becky Ofrane

Shared December 21, 2015

I wish there was even an ounce of this in the federal government workplace

Iskandar Abdullah

Shared April 1, 2016

Management

Rodrigo Santos

Shared February 11, 2017

If your not doing that, the second best thing is to be a jerk.

Nicolas Rivard

Shared June 14, 2017

Practice what you preach - honestly.

‘You know, Kim, I can tell I'm not really getting through to you. I'm going to have to be clearer here. When you say um every third word, it makes you sound stupid.’”

Nicolas Rivard

Shared June 14, 2017

Practice what you preach - honestly.

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.”

Simon Prince

Shared January 26, 2017

Uncomfortable but makes sense. Too many ums do make you sound stupid. Better to get that guidance (feedback)

doing

Isabel Hanson

Shared November 28, 2015

This is applicable to all good communication

Gary Givental

Shared December 17, 2015

I love this idea! Challenge directly and care personally!

Chris ~

Shared December 25, 2015

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance

Bardia Noohi

Shared March 13, 2016

Good reading for any leader/manager.

Alexia Lee

Shared November 3, 2016

Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Alexia Lee

Shared November 3, 2016

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

文剑 周

Shared January 22, 2017

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Louis-Dominic Parizeau

Shared January 27, 2017

If you can't offer radical candor, the second best thing you can do is be an asshole.

Joshua Biggley

Shared April 9, 2017

Every employee, and especially top performing employees, want to know how they can increase the performance at work. Managers who fail to be clear with their employees or who clearly don't care about their employees offer little in the way of an incentive to improve. Radical Candor is a fantastic way to move the whole conversation around performance to a new level.

Barry Leybovich

Shared June 13, 2016

This should be packaged with the book 'Crucial Conversations' and handed out to every aspiring manager.

Abigail Ruth Pilongo

Shared April 13, 2017

A challenge and a reminder for leaders. A must-read for fellow managers!

"I would argue that criticizing your employees when they screw up is not just your job, it's your moral obligation."

Kim Covent

Shared January 29, 2017

Radical candor, then, results from a combination of caring personally and challenging directly. But what does it look like in practice? Scott has created an acronym to help people remember:

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

arun appadurai

Shared December 22, 2015

A good boss, like a African lion is a rare species. And rarer still in India, where we see the effects of his absence in the Form of mediocre companies.

Jessi M

Shared December 28, 2015

Important read for anyone in the workforce, especially in a corporate setting when honesty is often buried beneath a layer 'professionalism.'

Jacob Pactor

Shared October 21, 2016

If you can't offer radical candor, the second best thing you can do is be an asshole.

Russ Harlan

Shared November 21, 2016

The choice of words reframes the opportunity.

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Julian Thomas

Shared November 26, 2016

Giving feedback intelligently within organization

Tina Park

Shared November 26, 2016

Eye-opening article that every leader should read.

Alex Thrasher

Shared February 1, 2017

Interesting read for any supervisors or managers out there

I would argue that criticizing your employees when they screw up is not just your job, it's actually your moral obligation.

Julien Bouvet

Shared May 11, 2017

“Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.”

Filipe Macedo

Shared August 14, 2017

It sounds so simple to say that bosses need to tell employees when they're screwing up. But it very rarely happens.

It sounds so simple to say that bosses need to tell employees when they're screwing up. But it very rarely happens.

Tilak Joshi

Shared January 10, 2016

Probably the single-most pivotal skill in being a leader

Tilak Joshi

Shared January 10, 2016

Probably the single-most pivotal leadership skill and the strongest differentiator between good and great leaders

Gökhan H. Himmetoğlu

Shared November 20, 2016

Being a good boss is a skill to be learned.

Kevin Donohue

Shared January 26, 2017

the four key things that any manager can do to create an environment of meaningful guidance:

Mitch Glick

Shared January 26, 2017

A good model

Nicola Principe

Shared January 27, 2017

siamo naturalmente degli ottimi boss...

hihihih

Hasan Hasan

Shared February 2, 2017

“Part of the reason Sheryl was able to say to me so bluntly, ‘You sounded stupid,’ was that I knew that she cared personally about me. She had done a thousand things that showed me that.” From inviting recent New York transplant Scott to join her book group, to encouraging her to take time off to care for a sick relative, Sandberg didn’t just invest in her professionally, but showed she truly cared about her. And she did that for everyone on her team. “Caring personally makes it much easier to do the next thing you have to do as a good boss, which is being willing to piss people off.”

Tim F

Shared November 28, 2015

Some great thoughts on a leadership approach that reduces the opportunities for misunderstanding and workplace toxicity.

Brett Szmajda

Shared December 8, 2015

Great read, and really resonates with those bosses who have been memorable in my life.

Marika Gillis

Shared December 15, 2015

As promised - some insights into the importance of giving feedback and receiving it - or as I suggested, asking for it! Yours in support! Marika

Laura Bergman

Shared December 15, 2015

Excellent tips for both workers and bosses on how to function in the workplace.

Jennifer Wilson

Shared January 21, 2016

There are a lot of bosses (people in general) who are quick with the "challenge directly" aspect of this article, but they never take the time to "care personally". Certainly food for thought.

Brent C

Shared February 27, 2016

The title is a little hyperbolic, but the strategy has merit.

Jakkawan Donwichai

Shared October 13, 2016

Thanks

Owen Pastrana

Shared October 18, 2016

Liked this management style. Great insights.

ycrehore Crehore

Shared October 20, 2016

Great no B.S read

Dina

Shared November 12, 2016

Great! Thanks!

Hilmi Abdullah

Shared November 21, 2016

banking

David Hepting

Shared November 24, 2016

This is super interesting.

Chris Tison

Shared November 27, 2016

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

Hampus Persson

Shared December 6, 2016

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize

nabil kazerouni

Shared December 8, 2016

— and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

Mike Syvovol

Shared February 18, 2017

Just in case

Cecil Mathew

Shared March 6, 2017

I hope to get better at this, and I hope every team I am on can try this too.

Wynne Maggi

Shared March 13, 2017

We should add this to our manager training and implement some of the ideas--I like "guidance" more than "feedback" for example.

Robert

Shared August 1, 2017

For all the present and future team managers, CEOs, ship captains or troop commanders. It's neither surprising, nor secret but there are some good tips on how to lead your squad. ;)

Robert

Shared August 1, 2017

For all the present and future team managers, CEOs, ship captains and troop commanders. It's neither suprising, nor secret but there are some great tips on how to call the shots. ;)

Pranav Kundaikar

Shared August 11, 2017

I would argue that criticizing your employees when they screw up is not just your job, it's actually your moral obligation

Mark Michael

Shared September 15, 2017

"The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for."

David Geisler

Shared November 27, 2015

Amazing article on how important it is to keep it real.

Marta Kvande

Shared November 28, 2015

Really interesting. The key, I think, has to be real caring when you offer such honesty.

c Guuuan

Shared January 18, 2016

Practical

Lin Yenting

Shared January 22, 2017

How to become a better leader? Advise with care but straight.

“Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.”

Aurimas Račas

Shared December 30, 2015

Totally agree: challenging people is probably the most important thing to do when leading them. And then you just need to care about them, and you are halfway to having a great team.

“There was this guy who was working for me. We'll call him Bob. I really liked Bob. The problem was that Bob was absolutely terrible at his job,” she says. Whenever Bob would express worries about his performance, Scott would try to reassure him. But after nearly a year, she realized that Bob’s weak performance was impacting her whole team — and she was in danger of losing several top performers as a result. Trying to be “nice” to Bob, she'd been unfair to the people who were doing great work. And things didn’t work out so well for Bob, either.

“Having never criticized Bob for 10 months because I was trying to spare his feelings, I was now sitting in front of Bob firing him. Not so nice after all,” says Scott. “When I told him, Bob pushed his chair back, looked at me, and said, ‘Why didn't you tell me? Why didn’t anyone tell me?’”

Michael Williams

Shared January 26, 2017

The most important part of being a good boss is giving clear, personal, consistent guidance.

David Kanenwisher

Shared August 26, 2017

Some great advice for managers.

Paul

Shared January 26, 2017

Awesome!

Jammie Ferguson

Shared January 26, 2017

It sounds so simple to say that bosses need to tell employees when they're screwing up. But it very rarely happens.

Joy Hurd

Shared November 28, 2015

Great read on managing and leading teams.

Ivan Valev

Shared December 10, 2015

Radicalizing candor - give it a try

David Gardner

Shared December 12, 2015

Very good article on being direct and providing constructive feedback.

Tim Blass

Shared December 18, 2015

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

Lam Ton

Shared December 18, 2015

"A lot of things were going wrong, but we were doing something right.”

Son Chang

Shared December 18, 2015

Radical Candor

Dan Waldman

Shared January 3, 2016

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Dan Waldman

Shared January 3, 2016

The vast majority of management mistakes happen in the quadrant that I call ruinous empathy,” she says.

Izzaz Iskandar

Shared February 7, 2016

A willingness to piss people off.

John Wayne Hill

Shared February 7, 2016

Great read about actually caring and giving actual critique.

lsaffie Saffie

Shared August 3, 2016

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

lsaffie Saffie

Shared August 3, 2016

If the vertical axis is caring personally and the horizontal axis is challenging directly, you want your feedback to fall in the upper right-hand quadrant. That’s where radical candor lies.

lsaffie Saffie

Shared August 3, 2016

I would argue that criticizing your employees when they screw up is not just your job, it's actually your moral obligation.

Alan Gillies

Shared October 16, 2016

Intriguing approach which might just challenge some perceived wisdoms

Jerrin Samuel

Shared October 26, 2016

really insightful

Mohsen Moosavi

Shared November 6, 2016

bullshit

Mohsen Moosavi

Shared November 6, 2016

Candor

Mark Buccella

Shared November 11, 2016

feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Kai Glaesner

Shared November 29, 2016

sehr interessanter Ansatz, der zu vertiefen wäre bzw. lohnen würde!!!

Elaina Rivais

Shared December 1, 2016

Avoid falling into patterns of ineffective feedback and help foster a culture of openness and growth. I appreciated the new (to me) perspective.

Daniel Mehaffey

Shared December 6, 2016

I wish people were more radically candid with me

Titiana Silimon-Morariu

Shared December 9, 2016

preparing for someday

Alok Upamanyu

Shared December 11, 2016

Loved it

Joseph Hinkle

Shared January 7, 2017

This is a good summary of why feedback is important. Most managers (and people) struggle with this one.

sam kupar

Shared January 7, 2017

Excellent advice for any team... Thanks

Thembinkosi Zulu

Shared February 4, 2017

Interesting article! Love it

Thembinkosi Zulu

Shared February 11, 2017

This is a great article on how to manage for success!

rohitinfosys .

Shared February 12, 2017

Fantastic read.

Brian Regan

Shared February 18, 2017

Great framing.

Jason Leach

Shared March 6, 2017

Important lesson

Jalpan Thakkar

Shared March 21, 2017

Really Good...!

yoli worth

Shared March 25, 2017

Inspiring piece on communicating and leading for new, healthier workplace and interactions

Rich H

Shared April 18, 2017

"Radical candor, then, results from a combination of caring personally and challenging directly. But what does it look like in practice? Scott has created an acronym to help people remember:

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”"

Jared Narlock

Shared May 6, 2017

Great Read!

Jim Andeway

Shared May 20, 2017

Fascinating take

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

“Caring personally makes it much easier to do the next thing you have to do as a good boss, which is being willing to piss people off.”

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

“I read about a leader who said he would always try to come up with the worst possible solution for both people when they came to him unable to resolve a disagreement. Because he didn't want to hear about it,”

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

“Taking notes yourself is a very important way to show people that you're listening, and to get corrections. And I would tell people that at the end of this meeting, I was going to share the document. We're not going to have time to go back and edit, because we're all too busy. That had a way of focusing the conversation.”

Kelly M

Shared June 6, 2017

Scott had learned to take her commitments to herself as seriously as any other professional responsibility.

Krystal Plomatos

Shared June 28, 2017

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

Azwar Anas

Shared July 16, 2017

hard to do. but had to be done

Santiago Savinon

Shared September 18, 2017

Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

Santiago Savinon

Shared September 18, 2017

to to push toward radical candor. Scott urges managers to go so far as to print out the quadrant system, post it near their desks, and explain what it means to their teams. “Get a couple of stickers, one color for praise and one color for criticism, and ask people to put stickers where they think your last interaction was on the graph," she says. "You'll be surprised how clear people will be with you about their reactions to the kind of guidance you're giving them.”

Christina Hally

Shared October 6, 2017

so simple yet amazing

Brandon Green

Shared October 14, 2017

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.” That last P makes a key distinction: “My boss didn’t say, ‘You're stupid.’ She said, ‘You sounded stupid when you said um.’ There's a big difference between the two.”

lsaffie Saffie

Shared October 28, 2017

The single most important thing a boss can do, Scott has learned, is focus on guidance: giving it, receiving it, and encouraging it. Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

lsaffie Saffie

Shared October 28, 2017

. “Finally, Sheryl said, ‘You know, Kim, I can tell I'm not really getting through to you. I'm going to have to be clearer here. When you say um every third word, it makes you sound stupid.’”

lsaffie Saffie

Shared October 28, 2017

If the vertical axis is caring personally and the horizontal axis is challenging directly, you want your feedback to fall in the upper right-hand quadrant. That’s where radical candor lies.

lsaffie Saffie

Shared October 28, 2017

Challenging others is difficult for many people; saying anything short of positive feels impolite. But once you become a boss, it’s your job to do be equally clear about what’s going wrong, and what’s going right.

lsaffie Saffie

Shared October 28, 2017

If you can't offer radical candor, the second best thing you can do is be an asshole.

Wander e Keila

Shared March 3, 2016

Great article. So similar to what a good coaching session is...

Leichtdog Burgerstein

Shared December 10, 2015

This should probably be three articles, but even so, it's right on the mark. I myself definitely prefer someone obnoxious than someone who cares, is tolerant up to a point and then snaps

Jon Wondrack

Shared January 2, 2016

Great tips

David Lohman

Shared January 17, 2016

corrigible

Laura Walker

Shared January 29, 2016

All you bosses out there, take it from me, as someone who's always been the employee, we thrive on the kind of "bossing" this article describes. Great read for anyone, really.

Christian Delén

Shared March 9, 2016

To prevent the meeting from devolving into a gripe session, force the team to prioritize issues. “I would say, ‘Changing behavior is hard; you can't ask your boss to get a personality transplant as a result of one 45-minute meeting. What are the one or two things you want your boss to do differently?’” says Scott.

Diane Bourget

Shared March 1, 2017

Excellent article!

Brendan Bowen

Shared January 4, 2017

This is a thought-provoking (and somewhat long) read for those of us who walk the tightrope between boss and coach.

Devon

Shared January 6, 2017

Put your own oxygen mask on first.

There’s a reason you hear this every time you board a plane — it’s good advice. “You can't possibly give a damn about other people if you don't give a damn about yourself. At one point, when I was having a very stressful period in my career, I realized that the most important thing I could do for my team was not hire great people. It was not to raise a lot of money. It was actually to take a run every morning,” Scott says.

She got pretty religious about it, running around the reservoir near her New York apartment every morning. Then one day, during a particularly difficult time at work, there was a big storm, lightning, hail and all. She thought about bailing, but quickly reconsidered and laced up her shoes. Scott had learned to take her commitments to herself as seriously as any other professional responsibility.

“There were usually hundreds of people running around the reservoir, but there was just one other nut out there that morning. As I got closer to him, I realized it was my co-founder," she says. "A lot of things were going wrong, but we were doing something right.”

Isaac Ramos

Shared March 20, 2017

Descripción de manera elocuente y matemática de lo que todo el mundo entiende como líder.

Sanjeev Singh

Shared January 26, 2017

The success of a Leader lies in the success of his / her people. The success of a Leader should be measured not only with business growth but also how his / her people are growing.

Janet Rowe

Shared February 5, 2017

This is a great concept, put it in action