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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Rishabh Srivastava

Shared January 9, 2017

“There’s a Russian anecdote about a man who loved his dog so much that when the vet told him he needed to cut the dog’s tail off he couldn’t do it all at once, so he did it an inch at a time. Don’t be that kind of manager.”

Robert Straus

Shared January 21, 2017

A good manager or leader understands that you can never learn too much or be too knowledgeable about a particular subject.

“The biggest thing I’ve learned about providing direction is that you do it with your ears and not your mouth,” Scott says. “The biggest mistake I’ve made and seen other managers make is that we’ll walk into a meeting with the team and say, ‘Here’s what we’re doing this quarter, or this year,’ and people are like, ‘No, that’s not what we should be doing.’ It turns out we haven’t listened to what people want and think we should do.”

Tucker Schreiber

Shared April 12, 2017

Just say it. “A lot of management training ties you in knots trying to say things just right. Just let it go. Just say it. It will probably be fine. Say it in private and say it right away. Criticism has a half-life. The longer you wait the worse the situation gets.”

Yana Dotcenko

Shared January 28, 2017

Cool article about team management

Jesse Biroscak

Shared March 19, 2017

"Good management is about deep personal relationships, which can be hard to accept when you’re all about growing fast. As Scott says, the hardest lesson about giving a damn — about management — may be that it doesn’t scale. And that’s okay."

Kenishia S. Mais

Shared July 13, 2017

Outside of one-on-ones, set a quarterly meeting with absolutely no agenda with each person you manage, she recommends. “Take a walk or grab a drink. Just talk about life. This is where you will learn the important things.”

Kenishia S. Mais

Shared July 13, 2017

Consider using your staff meeting to set the agenda for the big decision meeting. Identify the three most important decisions that need to get made that week, and who should make those decisions. Who is closest to the work involved? “This is how you push decision-making into the facts,” she says.

David Wormley

Shared March 26, 2017

"In the book The Fountainhead, there are two characters: The architect who is destined to change the face of the city, and his best friend, the electrician — the unsung hero who brings the city to life. To Scott, they are representative of the two major types of high-performing employees: People on a steep growth trajectory, and people on a more gradual growth trajectory.

“At too many companies, people on a gradual growth trajectory are treated as second-class citizens. This is a mistake,” she says.

People on a steep growth trajectory need to be managed in a very particular way. “You need to make sure you’re pushing them to take on new challenges. Make sure you are defining their path to promotion. Make them your thought partner. Don’t ignore them because they are independent. Don’t ignore them in the spirit of not wanting to micromanage them.” At the same time, these employees can be high-maintenance. They are unlikely to stay in one place for long.

“The people on the more gradual growth trajectory, they are the ones who will be in a role for a while,” Scott says. “You have to honor them for the great work they do, because too often they go unrecognized.”"

Godiva Golding

Shared January 12, 2018

Retreat Exercise
What are your core values?
What do you want to learn over the next year?
What do you want to learn in the next five years?
What are three things you want to be?

Their past. What changes have they made over time? Take their history as they tell it to you and pull out their core values, what motivates them, what do they really care about? Write down three to five learnings and then verify them with the person: “So what I’m hearing you say is that you care about freedom — freedom of time, not the freedom that money buys. Am I right?” Make sure you understand them, Scott advises.

Naqeeb

Shared December 21, 2016

A lot of good nuggets on management...

Baxter Mante

Shared January 6, 2018

The biggest thing I’ve learned about providing direction is that you do it with your ears and not your mouth,

Aiswarya Biradavolu

Shared December 8, 2017

Management is a deeply, deeply personal thing.

Pandu Padmanegara

Shared April 10, 2017

Great advice!

Benjamin

Shared July 12, 2017

The gentler the feedback, the less clear it tends to be.

Evernote Václavek

Shared January 19, 2017

She even called her CEO coach at the time and asked, “Is my job to build a great product or am I really just an armchair psychiatrist?” She got her answer when her coach literally yelled at her: “It’s called management and it is your job!” “These words have always rung in my ears, every time I’ve been tempted to stop caring,” Scott says.

Quach Tu

Shared February 27, 2017

Great lesson on management!

Yuta Lolap

Shared August 3, 2017

Management is a deeply, deeply personal thing.

Victor U. Bornstein

Shared January 4, 2017

Great insights on good startup management

James Grant

Shared March 16, 2017

Good insight. A tough one for me to go with however definitely worth aspiring towards and achieving.

“A lot of times you see decisions get kicked up to the more senior level, and so they get made by people who happen to be sitting around a certain table, not the people who know the facts. Don’t let this happen.”

Ravi

Shared April 21, 2017

In the book The Fountainhead, there are two characters: The architect who is destined to change the face of the city, and his best friend, the electrician — the unsung hero who brings the city to life. To Scott, they are representative of the two major types of high-performing employees: People on a steep growth trajectory, and people on a more gradual growth trajectory.

“At too many companies, people on a gradual growth trajectory are treated as second-class citizens. This is a mistake,” she says.

Nicole Rovig

Shared September 12, 2017

First you have to listen, then decide. #leadership #management

Michal Ophir

Shared May 12, 2018

The Tactics:

“The simplest tactic around giving a damn is to push your managers to have career conversations with their people,” she says. “This isn’t about mapping out their path to promotion, it’s about really getting to know them as

Mike Walmsley

Shared January 4, 2017

There’s a Russian anecdote about a man who loved his dog so much that when the vet told him he needed to cut the dog’s tail off he couldn’t do it all at once, so he did it an inch at a time. Don’t be that kind of manager.”

Paulista Ponto TK

Shared January 15, 2017

Good management is about deep personal relationships, which can be hard to accept when you’re all about growing fast

Paulista Ponto TK

Shared January 15, 2017

@_guidis

Tomek Legutko

Shared February 13, 2017

"Good management is about deep personal relationships, which can be hard to accept when you’re all about growing fast. As Scott says, the hardest lesson about giving a damn — about management — may be that it doesn’t scale. And that’s okay."

Michael Abramson

Shared July 13, 2017

“There’s a Russian anecdote about a man who loved his dog so much that when the vet told him he needed to cut the dog’s tail off he couldn’t do it all at once, so he did it an inch at a time. Don’t be that kind of manager.”

nagib muhamad

Shared December 18, 2017

advises

Jeff Robertz

Shared April 9, 2018

The article I mentioned

Adekunle Babatunde

Shared December 18, 2016

Sunday food for thought

Good managers give a damn.

Adekunle Babatunde

Shared December 18, 2016

Especially when you’re hiring a lot of college grads, these people are talented and they’ll grow fast in their careers. You need to take time to teach it to them.”

Jarratt Horton

Shared December 26, 2016

Good Managers give a damn

Good management is about deep personal relationships, which can be hard to accept when you’re all about growing fast. As Scott says, the hardest lesson about giving a damn — about management — may be that it doesn’t scale. And that’s okay.

terry zuo

Shared January 5, 2017

great

Harini Naidu

Shared January 14, 2017

Remarkably elucidated. A must read!

lisali126

Shared January 27, 2017

Good management is about deep personal relationships, which can be hard to accept when you’re all about growing fast.

Claudio Sanhueza

Shared February 7, 2017

Good management is about deep personal relationships, which can be hard to accept when you’re all about growing fast.

wadlingergohringm1@yahoo.com

Shared February 8, 2017

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Davia Casillas

Shared March 5, 2017

Improv

Faezeh

Shared March 24, 2017

This is a good and easy read for all the managers who are reflecting and getting ready for the new year

Frank Nil

Shared April 22, 2017

Well read. People forget that management is the proper usage of ALL organisational resources, and that include human assets as well.

grace holloway

Shared June 1, 2017

this is app i amazing ❤️❤️❤️

Jeff Florell

Shared June 21, 2017

Pocket

yaginu nori

Shared July 16, 2017

Managem

Marcel Oka

Shared September 11, 2017

Amazing

The Tactics:

“The simplest tactic around giving a damn is to push your managers to have career conversations with their people,” she says. “This isn’t about mapping out their path to promotion, it’s about really getting to know them as human beings.” And it’s actually two conversations:

Their past. What changes have they made over time? Take their history as they tell it to you and pull out their core values, what motivates them, what do they really care about? Write down three to five learnings and then verify them with the person: “So what I’m hearing you say is that you care about freedom — freedom of time, not the freedom that money buys. Am I right?” Make sure you understand them, Scott advises.

Their future. “Ask them: What are the three to five things they really want to be? Nobody knows the one thing they want to be — but they’ll probably have three to five conflicting images of what they really want to do in life.” Get those on the table, and encourage the person to be honest. Have fun talking about it.

Car4 View

Shared October 27, 2017

My Management Lessons from Three Failed Startups, Google, Apple, Dropbox, and Twitter

Szabolcs Dobra

Shared November 28, 2017

Nice summary.

The more you push yourself and your managers out of the process, the better your decisions will be.

Norwyn Steilsson

Shared December 4, 2017

No one sets out to be unclear in their feedback, but somewhere along the line things change. You’re worried about hurting the person’s feelings so you hold back. Then, when they don’t improve because you haven’t told them they are doing something wrong, you wind up firing them. Not so nice after all…”

Norwyn Steilsson

Shared December 4, 2017

Giving feedback is very emotional. Sometimes you get yelled at. Sometimes you get tears. These are hard, hard conversations.

Norwyn Steilsson

Shared December 4, 2017

The biggest thing I’ve learned about providing direction is that you do it with your ears and not your mouth

Amirul Salki

Shared December 9, 2017

This is important for manager!

Pirulove Porter

Shared January 13, 2018

Google Apple

Pirulove Porter

Shared January 13, 2018

Google Apple

Aaron C

Shared January 31, 2018

A good read for people managers.

. ..

Shared February 9, 2018

Criticism has a half-life

Tracy Chau

Shared February 10, 2018

In order to give people the feedback they need to get better, you can’t give a damn about whether they like you or not.

Emely Suazo

Shared March 11, 2018

Good article for current and future leaders

Rotem Kazir

Shared April 15, 2018

A great collection of management lessons, put shortly and directly.

WERT AVIRODT

Shared April 24, 2018

🙌

Winters Pedra

Shared June 23, 2018

There’s a Russian anecdote about a man who loved his dog so much that when the vet told him he needed to cut the dog’s tail off he couldn’t do it all at once, so he did it an inch at a time. Don’t be that kind of manager.”

Winters Pedra

Shared June 23, 2018

The architect who is destined to change the face of the city, and his best friend, the electrician — the unsung hero who brings the city to life.

Louis Mensah

Shared June 30, 2018

Practical management insights. I highly recommend this for new managers.

Bar Bruhis

Shared July 8, 2018

Criticism has a half-life. The longer you wait the worse the situation gets.”

Rene Küttim

Shared February 2, 2017

Tänane juhtimismõte!