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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Yiwen Luo

Shared May 18, 2018

H

Yiwen Luo

Shared May 18, 2018

A TV

James Varghese

Shared January 20, 2017

What matters, says Christakis, is the difference between passive and active consumption. In a study he conducted, two groups of kids played with blocks and watched TV. The group who spent their time engaged in active play scored significantly better on subsequent language acquisition tests.

Saket Kulkarni

Shared December 27, 2016

This remains a tough call. Our kids have had more iPad exposure than is probably good for them, on the other hand, the results are not as poor as most experts would have you believe.

lam green

Shared April 26, 2018

officially decreed

Richard Whiteside

Shared March 21, 2017

Interesting reading, especially as a father of a 10-month old!

Dr Jennifer Horner Miller, PhD

Shared January 17, 2017

Balanced approach is always best. #edtech

Rakhilya Lála Ibildayeva

Shared January 26, 2017

Hilarious how reading novels was considered detrimental to a human being's development in 1835. Sounds like a joke!

In 1835, the American Annals of Education declared that the “perpetual reading” of novels “inevitably operates to exclude thought, and in the youthful mind to stint the opening mental faculties, by favoring unequal development. No one can have time for reflection, who reads at this rapid rate.”

Paul Sednaoui

Shared March 9, 2017

Balance is everything... or so it seems!

Pankaj Rupani

Shared March 30, 2017

Searching for a way to justify this rationale, I called Dr. Dimitri Christakis, director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children's Research Institute. “Screens are purely a delivery mechanism. What parents should be focused on is the content,” he told me. A blanket ban on screens, he argued, doesn’t make sense. “I’m a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, but I have to say, their statement about the effects of electronic media is clearly out of date.”

What matters, says Christakis, is the difference between passive and active consumption. In a study he conducted, two groups of kids played with blocks and watched TV. The group who spent their time engaged in active play scored significantly better on subsequent language acquisition tests. Christakis is now replicating this study comparing the effect of television to interactive iPad games. The research isn’t finished yet, but Christakis says, “I suspect the effect of the iPad on the brain will be much closer to the blocks than the TV.”

Patrick Shortall

Shared December 21, 2016

What's it like growing up in the digital world?

Jose Luis Pajares

Shared August 16, 2017

Rather than making arbitrary limits on screen time, says Levine, parents should make sure kids’ experience with technology is shared.

Jose Luis Pajares

Shared August 16, 2017

Screens are purely a delivery mechanism. What parents should be focused on is the content,”

Jose Luis Pajares

Shared August 16, 2017

For kids under 30 months old, they learned more when there was an interactive component. And so I think that shows the potential touchscreen devices might have as educational tools, especially when compared to television.”

Evan R

Shared September 17, 2017

Good thoughts, generally agree and believe kids also have a bit of self-regulation built in.

Nabha Cosley

Shared December 26, 2017

What matters, says Christakis, is the difference between passive and active consumption.

Beatrice Sorrentino

Shared November 19, 2017

badly

Beatrice Sorrentino

Shared April 3, 2018

bel ragazzino

Mark Johnson

Shared January 12, 2017

This question may be unanswerable. But as with many things, balance and moderation are key.

Deepak Mantoju

Shared April 11, 2017

L seeded Siuubug jo

Ivan P

Shared April 18, 2017

Good read

sam rolando

Shared July 9, 2017

a must read for upcoming parent's

Stephen Norris

Shared March 3, 2018

Here’s an article from 2013 accounting a mothers conflicting fear and acceptance of introducing technological devices (iPad) to her toddler. It provides two important points of view regarding these concerns which are still relevant today!

Anna K

Shared January 21, 2017

With the research, without the paranoia.

Daeeun Kim

Shared December 20, 2016

pocket sharing test

Alisha Koo

Shared January 1, 2017

Great insightful article for parents concerned about childrens exposure to technology and how to continue to adapt as parents.

Monica Cabiles

Shared January 9, 2017

Oh uh!

Sean Trinidad

Shared February 1, 2017

“The world of digital media is transforming so rapidly, it’s very hard for researchers to keep up with the effects on children,”

Morin Odhiambo

Shared February 19, 2017

Then there are the cons that come with tech, sigh........
#parenting

Daniela Sanchez

Shared March 20, 2017

Waw I love it 😍

Vicki Overton

Shared April 7, 2017

"Douglas Rushkoff’s motto to heart: program or be programmed. "

Mr.fireskull f

Shared April 16, 2017

cool

Ku Schu

Shared April 26, 2017

I

Samuel Hernandez Jr.

Shared May 16, 2017

true

Abed Nourallah

Shared April 6, 2017

really

Prashant Patel

Shared October 12, 2017

Yes

Ali Ciger

Shared December 22, 2017

every tech is demonized.

Radio was so addictive, parents warned, that children were skipping meals to tune in, and film transformed viewers into sexually deviant criminals. Television was a mental wasteland. Video games created violent killers.

Ali Ciger

Shared December 22, 2017

brain development of babies

During the first two years of a baby’s life, its brain triples in weight, marking a period of explosive growth that will never be matched again in its life. Those early years are a crucial time for mental development, setting the foundation for adulthood. Synapses, the connections between neurons in the brain, explode in number. We’re born with about 2,500 synapses per neuron, but by age three we’ll have around 15,000. From that point the number of neural connections actually begins to decrease. This explains, for example, why children are capable of learning complex language skills that intelligent adults find difficult to master later in life.

Ali Ciger

Shared December 22, 2017

focus on the content

Screens are purely a delivery mechanism. What parents should be focused on is the content,” he told me. A blanket ban on screens, he argued, doesn’t make sense. “I’m a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, but I have to say, their statement about the effects of electronic media is clearly out of date.”

Ali Ciger

Shared December 22, 2017

And besides, whatever technology I’m preparing or protecting him from today will likely seem as outdated to a teenage Oliver as my collection of rap CDs. “The world of digital media is transforming so rapidly, it’s very hard for researchers to keep up with the effects on children,” says Daniel Anderson, a professor of psychology at the University of Massachusetts who studies childhood development and media. “TV today is, fundamentally, the same as TV 40 years ago, but the way we engage with computers today is very different from 20, even 10 years ago.” In raising his own son, Anderson had ideas for how much television he should watch, but no clue about how to respond to the social networks that ended up becoming his son’s obsession. “I expect those changes to keep accelerating,” Anderson says. “We’re beyond the event horizon, so to speak.”

uday kumar

Shared December 22, 2017

Ek

Valentin Hinov

Shared January 29, 2018

Scary thing

Computer Training

Shared February 12, 2018

Important for new parents.

Günter Tomescheit

Shared March 27, 2018

ssx

Kasper Lyskjær

Shared April 1, 2018

Spændende læsning om børns skærmtid.

D N

Shared April 5, 2018

Archive

Ravi Kurapati K

Shared June 6, 2018

Time pass

Sachin

Shared June 15, 2018

Balance is the key

Ammar Munajaf

Shared March 11, 2017

"When we put kids in a room with an iPad, they will choose that over other toys. They will often choose it over their own mothers."

Albert Goodman

Shared March 30, 2017

Is technology scrambling my baby's brain?

Leo Rutten

Shared December 13, 2017

meest gelezen

Devin Johns

Shared February 1, 2017

Basically, the answer is, "We don't know." People said the same things about excessive reading, listening to radio, watching TV, reading comic books, and playing video games. The takeaway from this article is WHAT they're engaging with on the tablet (learning, mental stimulation, etc.) is most important and also that you try to be part of the experience, not just hand them a tablet and say, "Be free!"