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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Casey Newton

Shared May 29, 2016

Great overview of some dark patterns in product design.

For example, in the physical world of grocery stories, the #1 and #2 most popular reasons to visit are pharmacy refills and buying milk. But grocery stores want to maximize how much people buy, so they put the pharmacy and the milk at the back of the store.

Manoush Zomorodi

Shared May 23, 2016

Techie friend of our Note to Self podcast on what happens inside your head

Josh Constine

Shared June 22, 2016

Why social networks are built to be addictive and need to change

Tiffany Zhong

Shared December 5, 2016

Must-read.

Guillaume Laforge

Shared June 14, 2016

Very interesting article on how most websites and businesses steal our time and force us to consume more. What if there were some ethical label that favors sites / businesses that respect our valuable time and true agenda?

Kushan

Shared May 25, 2016

What a Brilliant, Brilliant article is this!

tomas Bella

Shared May 28, 2016

For example, NYTimes.com lets you “make a free choice” to cancel your digital subscription. But instead of just doing it when you hit “Cancel Subscription,” they send you an email with information on how to cancel your account by calling a phone number that’s only open at certain times.

Maxime Thirouin

Shared June 6, 2016

How Technology Hijacks People’s Minds — from a Magician and Google’s Design Ethicist

Rodrigo Franco

Shared June 5, 2016

Spot on.

Sar Haribhakti

Shared May 20, 2016

BRILLIANT.

Herval Freire

Shared May 25, 2016

Interesting thoughts on how software is designed to hook us in

Nicolas Fallourd

Shared July 5, 2016

This medium is really essential when it comes to understand user behavior 👍🏻

Andy Stevens

Shared May 27, 2016

Over de psychologische trukendoos die technologiebedrijven gebruikenom ons bij hen te houden.

Marco Frattola

Shared October 3, 2016

Deviazioni mentali di origine digitale #fb

Akhil Unnikrishnan

Shared June 2, 2016

Everything about this post seems familiar on reading and you start realizing just how much work goes into making tech products addictive.

Paul Brody

Shared May 22, 2016

Fantastic must-read for people thinking about design and everyone using it.

Christopher Penn

Shared June 5, 2016

A vitally important read.

Ryan Wilkins

Shared June 21, 2016

The more choices technology gives us in nearly every domain of our lives (information, events, places to go, friends, dating, jobs) — the more we assume that our phone is always the most empowering and useful menu to pick from. Is it?

The “most empowering” menu is different than the menu that has the most choices. But when we blindly surrender to the menus we’re given, it’s easy to lose track of the difference

Micah Daigle

Shared May 26, 2016

This is very good.

Nikhil Joseph

Shared May 21, 2016

If you've ever been concerned about how you consume technology and why it's so hard to change, read this.

Shailaja V

Shared January 6, 2017

Long read but a very good one.

rahul .poruri

Shared May 26, 2016

Stop everything you're doing and read this! Right now!

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

Where does technology exploit our minds’ weaknesses?

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

Once you know how to push people’s buttons, you can play them like a piano

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

By shaping the menus we pick from, technology hijacks the way we perceive our choices and replaces them new ones

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

average person checks their phone 150 times a day. Why do we do this? Are we making 150 conscious choices?

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

If you want to maximize addictiveness, all tech designers need to do is link a user’s action (like pulling a lever) with a variable reward.

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

Slot machines make more money in the United States than baseball, movies, and theme parks combined

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

now companies like Apple and Google have a responsibility to reduce these effects by converting intermittent variable rewards into less addictive, more predictable ones with better design

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

But living moment to moment with the fear of missing something isn’t how we’re built to live

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

Like Facebook, LinkedIn exploits an asymmetry in perception. When you receive an invitation from someone to connect, you imagine that person making a conscious choice to invite you, when in reality, they likely unconsciously responded to LinkedIn’s list of suggested contacts. In other words, LinkedIn turns your unconscious impulses (to “add” a person) into new social obligations that millions of people feel obligated to repay. All while they profit from the time people spend doing it

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

The problem is, maximizing interruptions in the name of business creates a tragedy of the commons, ruining global attention spans and causing billions of unnecessary interruptions each day

Rex Arul

Shared May 23, 2016

ultimate freedom is a free mind, and we need technology that’s on our team to help us live, feel, think and act freely

eve massacre

Shared May 28, 2016

When we pull our phone out of our pocket, we’re playing a slot machine to see what notifications we got.

Jochen Lillich

Shared June 18, 2016

Eye-opening article about how Facebook, YouTube & Co. manipulate us into spending time on their websites.

Shreeniwas Iyer

Shared May 29, 2016

Eye Opening:

Vsevolod Solovyov

Shared May 31, 2016

How Technology Hijacks People's Minds - в общем-то, все это знают, но хорошо просуммировано.

Saager Mhatre

Shared May 26, 2016

Of course, Tristan Harris left put how he slighted you to provide his shiny new service a boatload of traffic by using his ex-Googler credentials, the hook of being a magician as well as how he wants to help you ensure your time on The Internet is 'Time Well Spent'®™

Santiago Alonso

Shared May 28, 2016

If you want to maximize addictiveness, all tech designers need to do is link a user’s action (like pulling a lever) with a variable reward. You pull a lever and immediately receive either an enticing reward (a match, a prize!) or nothing. Addictiveness is maximized when the rate of reward is most variable.

Martin Soler

Shared August 12, 2016

Some very good points on how tech is stealing our time. I've already mentioned how I don't think tech companies should measure their success based on how much of our time they have taken. That metric will backfire. It can't do anything else.
The article lacks some concrete recommendations. Especially on the menu section. Yes we aren't shown what isn't there but do we really want unlimited choice?
Enjoy the read.

Elad

Shared May 23, 2016

Fascinating.

Norbert Fernandes

Shared May 22, 2016

The ultimate freedom is a free mind, and we need technology that’s on our team to help us live, feel, think and act freely.

We need our smartphones, notifications screens and web browsers to be exoskeletons for our minds and interpersonal relationships that put our values, not our impulses, first. People’s time is valuable. And we should protect it with the same rigor as privacy and other digital rights.

Gary-Yau Chan

Shared May 26, 2016

This keeps us subscribed to newsletters even after they haven’t delivered recent benefits (“what if I miss a future announcement?”)
This keeps us “friended” to people with whom we haven’t spoke in ages (“what if I miss something important from them?”)
This keeps us swiping faces on dating apps, even when we haven’t even met up with anyone in a while (“what if I miss that one hot match who likes me?”)
This keeps us using social media (“what if I miss that important news story or fall behind what my friends are talking about?”)

Anton Gorodetsky

Shared July 26, 2016

Как технологии пользуются нашими слабостями, автор — человек, 3 года отвечавший в Гугл за этику продукта. Здесь — все основные техники давления: грубые нотификации, бесконечные ленты, auto play, «страх пропустить», неполные меню и т.п. Будет полезно и тем, кто реально ощущает переизбыток соцсетей и медиа в своей жизни, и тем, кто намерен делать на этом деньги

Marcin Puś

Shared June 13, 2016

ciekawe i dobrze podane

Jérémie Pottier

Shared July 19, 2016

maximizing interruptions in the name of business creates a tragedy of the commons, ruining global attention spans and causing billions of unnecessary interruptions each day.

Kenny Meyers

Shared May 22, 2016

There are very few articles that later my perception of tech. I love this one.

Kenny Meyers

Shared May 22, 2016

There are very few articles that alter my perception of technology. This is a great one.

Josh Cunningham

Shared May 29, 2016

Very important read for consumers and creators of the web. A contrast to the book Hooked, which I liked but made me uneasy thinking about implementing features to unconsciously draw people in.

Keya Madhvani

Shared July 15, 2016

Cannot recommend this more -- working at a Tech company, I know most of these things to be true, but seeing it listed out here in this way, really draws out the challenge we're facing as a society.

Wietse Van Ransbeeck

Shared May 28, 2016

imagine if technology companies empowered you to consciously bound your experience to align with what would be “time well spent” for you. Not just bounding the quantity of time you spend, but the qualities of what would be “time well spent

Nils Öhman

Shared May 23, 2016

The more choices technology gives us in nearly every domain of our lives (information, events, places to go, friends, dating, jobs) — the more we assume that our phone is always the most empowering and useful menu to pick from. Is it?

The more choices technology gives us in nearly every domain of our lives (information, events, places to go, friends, dating, jobs) — the more we assume that our phone is always the most empowering and useful menu to pick from. Is it?

Viktor Voronin

Shared May 30, 2016

Brilliant analogies on intermittent variable rewards we get online

Mourad DACHRAOUI

Shared June 6, 2016

Social media, in a nutshell.

Imagine millions of people getting interrupted like this throughout their day, running around like chickens with their heads cut off, reciprocating each other — all designed by companies who profit from it.

Welcome to social media.

Jai Vipra

Shared September 15, 2016

Excellent

Akshay Ratan

Shared December 24, 2016

Brilliant read to consider how we spend our day immersed in technology. Think again!

We need our smartphones, notifications screens and web browsers to be exoskeletons for our minds and interpersonal relationships that put our values, not our impulses, first. People’s time is valuable. And we should protect it with the same rigor as privacy and other digital rights.

Neal McQuaid

Shared May 24, 2016

An amazing article

Cheryl Hsu

Shared May 21, 2016

They give people the illusion of free choice while architecting the menu so that they win, no matter what you choose.

Cheryl Hsu

Shared May 21, 2016

The “most empowering” menu is different than the menu that has the most choices

Lukas

Shared May 27, 2016

Well formulated fallout of attention economy.

Andrew Eisenberg

Shared June 3, 2016

There is a fine line between tech that we want to use and tech that hijacks us

Mathieu D

Shared June 8, 2016

a must read

Christophe Pasquier

Shared June 19, 2016

Imagine if technology companies had a responsibility to minimize social reciprocity. Or if there was an independent organization that represented the public’s interests — an industry consortium or an FDA for tech — that monitored when technology companies abused these biases?

Daniel Hopkins

Shared August 6, 2016

Time well spent sounds like a worthy goal to me

Jason Siegel

Shared May 24, 2016

Whoa

Marat

Shared June 27, 2016

This is great.

Ker Metanoia Oliva

Shared June 27, 2016

No such thing as free lunch; no such thing as free mind.

Kimberli Zhong

Shared December 30, 2016

The ultimate freedom is a free mind, and we need technology that’s on our team to help us live, feel, think and act freely.

Jose Menor

Shared May 29, 2016

The Wizard of Oz is a drug dealer, do yourself a favor and read this

Jonathan Cohen

Shared July 16, 2016

But the closer we pay attention to the options we’re given, the more we’ll notice when they don’t actually align with our true needs.

Jonathan Cohen

Shared July 16, 2016

Imagine millions of people getting interrupted like this throughout their day, running around like chickens with their heads cut off, reciprocating each other — all designed by companies who profit from it.

Jonathan Cohen

Shared July 16, 2016

That’s why I add “Estimated reading time” to the top of my posts. When you put the “true cost” of a choice in front of people, you’re treating your users or audience with dignity and respect

David Burns

Shared August 6, 2016

Amazing read

Mr. Thoro

Shared 1 day ago

They play your psychological vulnerabilities (consciously and unconsciously) against you in the race to grab your attention.

Mr. Thoro

Shared 1 day ago

wake up in the morning and turn our phone over to see a list of notifications — it frames the experience of “waking up in the morning” around a menu of “all the things I’ve missed since yesterday.”

Daniel Noll

Shared June 29, 2016

Last piece of dystopia for the day. I find it worthwhile (for the purposes of my own sanity and productivity) to be aware of how easily my buttons can be pressed by technology. Upshot lesson = embrace the useful, ditch the distraction.

When using technology, we often focus optimistically on all the things it does for us. But I want to show you where it might do the opposite.

Bill Wanjohi

Shared May 30, 2016

Technology companies definitely need more "design ethicists" in the conversation.

Nadir Sidi

Shared May 23, 2016

Cell phones are basically slot machines.

Derek Coatney

Shared May 26, 2016

Excellent read. Interesting both as a consumer and a PM.

Matt Chamberlain

Shared June 9, 2016

Very interesting.

Bran Dolicki

Shared June 11, 2016

For example, in the physical world of grocery stories, the #1 and #2 most popular reasons to visit are pharmacy refills and buying milk. But grocery stores want to maximize how much people buy, so they put the pharmacy and the milk at the back of the store.

In other words, they make the thing customers want (milk, pharmacy) inseparable from what the business wants. If stores were truly organized to support people, they would put the most popular items in the front.

Tech companies design their websites the same way. For example, when you you want to look up a Facebook event happening tonight (your reason) the Facebook app doesn’t allow you to access it without first landing on the news feed (their reasons), and that’s on purpose. Facebook wants to convert every reason you have for using Facebook, into their reason which is to maximize the time you spend consuming things.

Bran Dolicki

Shared June 11, 2016

incidentally, this is what assistant bots do.

In an ideal world, apps would always give you a direct way to get what you want separately from what they want.

Bran Dolicki

Shared June 11, 2016

We need our smartphones, notifications screens and web browsers to be exoskeletons for our minds and interpersonal relationships that put our values, not our impulses, first. People’s time is valuable. And we should protect it with the same rigor as privacy and other digital rights.

Holly Dowell

Shared June 8, 2016

As a UX designer, I cringe at the cynicism of the article (may technologists are truly trying to create a helpful experience for you), but fully acknowledge the psychological aspect. It's an important side of technology to consider.

Holly Dowell

Shared June 8, 2016

Fascinating read. As a UX designer, I can say not all design is malicious, but this is an important side of technology to be aware of.

Justin Matich

Shared December 26, 2016

Great piece

Vitor Capela

Shared May 20, 2016

A lot to chew on. This is a topic I think about constantly, and struggle with just as frequently. A free mind is a privilege we should guard dutifully.

Nikhil Somaru

Shared May 20, 2016

Required reading if you care about the direction technology is going in

Pranav Rao

Shared May 21, 2016

Things get really interesting from Hijack #2 .

Cristen Jones

Shared June 6, 2016

A must-read!!

Thomas van der Straten

Shared August 8, 2016

“It’s easier to fool people than to convince them that they’ve been fooled.”

The Rambling Teapot

Shared August 18, 2016

Google’s Design Ethicist (and a former magician) reflects on how social media apps use dark patterns to hijack our agency, and what "freedom" in choice we have left.

"Magicians start by looking for blind spots, edges, vulnerabilities and limits of people’s perception, so they can influence what people do without them even realizing it. Once you know how to push people’s buttons, you can play them like a piano.

And this is exactly what product designers do to your mind. They play your psychological vulnerabilities (consciously and unconsciously) against you in the race to grab your attention.

“People don’t intuitively forecast the true cost of a click when it’s presented to them.

"We need our smartphones, notifications screens and web browsers to be exoskeletons for our minds and interpersonal relationships that put our values, not our impulses, first. People’s time is valuable. And we should protect it with the same rigor as privacy and other digital rights."

Radya

Shared September 13, 2016

More like advices to make addictive service

Lowell Bander

Shared May 21, 2016

The thought, “what if I miss something important?” is generated in advance of unplugging, unsubscribing, or turning off — not after.

Joe Owens

Shared May 21, 2016

They're inside your mind!

m L

Shared May 26, 2016

Amazing review of how facebook et al use UX design to make you do what they want. #MustRead

Pallavi Thampi

Shared May 30, 2016

We don’t miss what we don’t see.

Pallavi Thampi

Shared May 30, 2016

Imagine millions of people getting interrupted like this throughout their day, running around like chickens with their heads cut off, reciprocating each other — all designed by companies who profit from it.

Welcome to social media.

Joakim Ejenstam

Shared May 31, 2016

Spend a thought about why you respond to services suggestions. Is this what I/my friends want me to do?

Facebook, Instagram or SnapChat can manipulate how often people get tagged in photos by automatically suggesting all the faces people should tag (e.g. by showing a box with a 1-click confirmation, “Tag Tristan in this photo?”).

Pere Monguio Montells

Shared June 21, 2016

Imagine millions of people getting interrupted like this throughout their day, running around like chickens with their heads cut off, reciprocating each other — all designed by companies who profit from it.

Welcome to social media.

Rin Raj

Shared July 3, 2016

<3 the new light

Tobias Kehl

Shared October 7, 2016

Perfect read to think about the whole weekend. And spend your time well next week ;)

pablo apiolazza

Shared June 24, 2016

For those who think that we live in the age of free will.

Antoine Lizée

Shared June 25, 2016

This is an awesome read on current aggressive PM trends and their deleterious side-effects on our lives.

Radoslav Šonský

Shared July 21, 2016

totally worth the 12 minutes ;-)

Jason Pearson

Shared December 25, 2016

"Millions of us fiercely defend our right to make “free” choices, while we ignore how those choices are manipulated upstream by menus we didn’t choose in the first place."

Western Culture is built around ideals of individual choice and freedom. Millions of us fiercely defend our right to make “free” choices, while we ignore how those choices are manipulated upstream by menus we didn’t choose in the first place

Craig Rowe

Shared May 24, 2016

Insightful discussion of the ethics of UX

Ed Hammerton

Shared May 24, 2016

The more choices technology gives us in nearly every domain of our lives (information, events, places to go, friends, dating, jobs) — the more we assume that our phone is always the most empowering and useful menu to pick from.

Joël Costamagna

Shared May 26, 2016

it’s that Yelp substituted the group’s original question (“where can we go to keep talking?”) with a different question (“what’s a bar with good photos of cocktails?”)

Aditya Chincholi

Shared May 28, 2016

Design Ethics are truly needed in order to ensure a world that is governed by people and not tech companies

Clive Richards

Shared July 21, 2016

Superb read. Very insightful #recommended

Trenten Babcock

Shared July 29, 2016

brilliant and quite unnerving

Julie Leary

Shared August 29, 2016

New angle on the war against technology

Pavel Shut

Shared May 30, 2016

Пра механізмы сацыяльных сетак як змарнаваць як мага больш вашага часу. Well worth a read

Chris Le

Shared May 30, 2016

Snares everywhere to indulge impulses!

We need our smartphones, notifications screens and web browsers to be exoskeletons for our minds and interpersonal relationships that put our values, not our impulses, first.

Aleksey Khodakovskiy

Shared May 31, 2016

Simple ways to access and hijack our psychological vulnerabilities + how facebook, instagram and other applications do it with you everyday

Y K

Shared June 13, 2016

Surprisingly insightful, it's about dark patterns in product design, and how they are used to keep you hooked.

Dan Blănaru

Shared June 17, 2016

a must read

Remi Lacoste

Shared June 19, 2016

A nice overview of how the internet is built that everyone should read.

Igor Carvalho

Shared July 25, 2016

Um interessante olhar aos triques que nem percebemos

Jan Pleis@theholisticview

Shared October 30, 2016

Some amazing ideas and insights on design. A must read for everyone who is at least a bit interested in design.

Justin Eckrich

Shared December 17, 2016

Another clue to what my next business is all about. Going to be epic.

Fiona MacDougall

Shared June 1, 2016

Excellent article on the #psychology behind #tech #design. Now I'm noticing all kinds of sneaky hijacks...

Jaydeep Singh

Shared July 8, 2016

Wonderful read. Also what a cool job "product philosopher" and studying "design ethics"

Tony Mann

Shared May 29, 2016

Slot machines make more money in the United States than baseball, movies, and theme parks combined.

Falko Noe

Shared May 21, 2016

We’re all vulnerable to social approval. The need to belong, to be approved or appreciated by our peers is among the highest human motivations. But now our social approval is in the hands of tech companies.

Charles Lestari

Shared May 22, 2016

Estimated reading time: 12 minutes

Naomi Fennell

Shared May 23, 2016

Wow. Worth the read. Very insightful. After reading this I feel like I have been brainwashed by technology.

Niall McCullagh

Shared May 24, 2016

Gamification of user experiences

Alex Vanacker

Shared May 25, 2016

A thorough article on how we are modeled by tech firms to use their products, and how to let go.

Sydney Fliorent

Shared May 25, 2016

and

Minn Kim

Shared May 25, 2016

This. Plus So glad this led to Joe Edelman's talk https://vimeo.com/123488311 #design

But the closer we pay attention to the options we’re given, the more we’ll notice when they don’t actually align with our true needs.

Vivien Siu

Shared May 26, 2016

good read for product / designers with a great message.

Gavin Dluehosh

Shared May 27, 2016

Instead of viewing the world in terms of availability of choices, we should view the world in terms of friction required to enact choices.

Fran Kee

Shared May 30, 2016

great

N.M Jafari

Shared June 3, 2016

good

Fang Jie

Shared July 5, 2016

Where does technology exploit our minds’ weaknesses?

George Proimakis

Shared June 3, 2016

Incredible work! Many thanks!

DT Pham

Shared June 9, 2016

estern Culture is built around ideals of individual choice and freedom. Millions of us fiercely defend our right to make “free” choices, while we ignore how those choices are manipulated upstream by menus we didn’t choose in the first place.

This is exactly what magicians do. They give people the illusion of free choice while architecting the menu so that they win, no matter what you choose. I can’t emphasize enough how deep this insight is.

Alex Coelho

Shared August 24, 2016

Don't forget, 12 well spent minutes!

Estimated reading time: 12 minutes.

Rolf Thijsen

Shared November 3, 2016

But here’s the unfortunate truth — several billion people have a slot machine their pocket:

When we pull our phone out of our pocket, we’re playing a slot machine to see what notifications we got.

Chin yee ann

Shared December 22, 2016

Worth reading it 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻

Ryan Pramberg

Shared December 22, 2016

dang this was good. definitely putting sone of these into practice in my life

Zacheriah Loeb-Houston

Shared January 6, 2017

A lot of stuff in this article is nothing new, but it has some interesting points, like pointing out some of the ways that tech companies leverage/exploit our cognitive biases and weaknesses (e.g. FOMSI, social reciprocity, instant interruptions and urgency, forcing you to choose from a menu and focussing on availability of choices vs. difficulty of choices). Also, their position that companies have a responsibility to reduce these effects, and that they should be regulated (the “digital bill of rights”) is interesting, albeit fairly radical.

I also thought the “estimating reading time” at the top was really cool, though I couldn’t help but think that a word count might be better since assuming everyone reads at an average speed might have some ableist/able-normative implications.

Also LOL @“ Imagine millions of people getting interrupted like this throughout their day, running around like chickens with their heads cut off, reciprocating each other — all designed by companies who profit from it. Welcome to social media.”

Akhilesh Maurya

Shared January 8, 2017

a MUST READ

Rich Hall

Shared July 18, 2016

Excellent article - now I need to try my best to not implement these in any of the digital ad units I build ;)

Szabolcs Bokonyi

Shared August 20, 2016

Amazing article about Technology's mindfucks

Jer M

Shared 10 minutes ago

Whoa! While #2 was pretty logical, #6 was eye-opening. What stuck out to you?

Cedrick Song

Shared May 21, 2016

Like push

But now companies like Apple and Google have a responsibility to reduce these effects by converting intermittent variable rewards into less addictive, more predictable ones with better design. For example, they could empower people to set predictable times during the day or week for when they want to check “slot machine” apps, and correspondingly adjust when new messages are delivered to align with those times.

Wen Luo

Shared May 22, 2016

product designers or user experience designers' job is not to provide user best product. They are aim to trick users in a merciful way to let them believe all of this is for their good.

Jo Hetland

Shared May 24, 2016

Good insight, to the point

Photo

Humberto Brasiliense

Shared May 31, 2016

Vale a pena conferir!

Srg Kas

Shared June 5, 2016

"..this is exactly what product designers do to your mind. They play your psychological vulnerabilities (consciously and unconsciously) against you in the race to grab your attention."

Once you know how to push people’s buttons, you can play them like a piano.

Srg Kas

Shared June 5, 2016

"Millions of us fiercely defend our right to make “free” choices, while we ignore how those choices are manipulated upstream by menus we didn’t choose in the first place."

Western Culture is built around ideals of individual choice and freedom.

Srg Kas

Shared June 5, 2016

The more choices technology gives us in nearly every domain of our lives (information, events, places to go, friends, dating, jobs) — the more we assume that our phone is always the most empowering and useful menu to pick from. Is it?

Srg Kas

Shared June 5, 2016

We’re all vulnerable to social approval. The need to belong, to be approved or appreciated by our peers is among the highest human motivations. But now our social approval is in the hands of tech companies.

Srg Kas

Shared June 5, 2016

Everyone innately responds to social approval, but some demographics (teenagers) are more vulnerable to it than others.

Srg Kas

Shared June 5, 2016

Imagine millions of people getting interrupted like this throughout their day, running around like chickens with their heads cut off, reciprocating each other — all designed by companies who profit from it.

Welcome to social media.

Srg Kas

Shared June 5, 2016

"Tech companies exploit the same principle. News feeds are purposely designed to auto-refill with reasons to keep you scrolling, and purposely eliminate any reason for you to pause, reconsider or leave.'

you can trick people into keep eating soup by giving them a bottomless bowl that automatically refills as they eat.

Srg Kas

Shared June 5, 2016

"In an ideal world, there is always a direct way to get what you want separately from what businesses want."

The ultimate freedom is a free mind, and we need technology that’s on our team to help us live, feel, think and act freely.

Abigail Young

Shared June 7, 2016

Definitely worth the read

Priyanka Bamnikar

Shared June 8, 2016

Very interesting point if view. Loved it

Michał Nowakowski

Shared June 30, 2016

How internet deceives you

çağla Tekeli

Shared July 12, 2016

çeşitli paylasim uygulamalari anksiyete, dikkat dağınıklığı, depresif semptomlar ve zaman kaybına neden olur. Bunlara nasıl sebep olduğunu anlatan yazı.

çağla Tekeli

Shared July 12, 2016

paylaşım uygulamaları kaygı, dikkat dağınıklıği ve depresif semptomlara neden oluyor. Zaman kaybettiriyor. bu uygulamaların hangi yöntemlerle kişileri kendine bağladığını anlatan yazı.

Eugenia Chapman

Shared November 15, 2016

Time well spent

prashant bisht

Shared December 25, 2016

while

Bernat Riera

Shared June 5, 2016

Very interesting.

Grzegorz Wierzowiecki

Shared July 25, 2016

Must read for all living in our beginnings of digital age.
Great article closely related to http\:// imewellspent.io/ .

Grzegorz Wierzowiecki

Shared July 25, 2016

Must read for all living in our beginnings of digital age.
Great article closely related to http://timewellspent.io/ .

PjotBekks

Shared October 7, 2016

Engineering distraction.
- 12 Minutes -

Christina Lee

Shared December 17, 2016

urban

maga

Shared December 25, 2016

We don’t miss what we don’t see.

George Allen

Shared December 26, 2016

Interesting article on the tricks used to keep you on social media and other sites. I often find my phone a distraction from the real world and try my best to limit my dependence on it. Knowing these tactics is useful in combating them. Remember that you should control your technology and not let it control you.

Antoaneta Angelova

Shared January 4, 2017

I just cannot recommend this article enough.

Paul Parker

Shared January 8, 2017

Fascinating article on how tech is designed to get you to do things the tech makers want you to do instead of what you want to do.

BTW, are any of you using Pocket? I find it invaluable to winnow down the articles that look interesting at the time (just click to Pocket anything on the Web) to ones worth reading later, and as a bonus it suggests great articles based on what I've put in Pocket.

phasestatr

Shared 19 hours ago

http://goo.gl/ExQIpG