Must Read on Pocket

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Recommendations from Pocket Users

Akshat Rathi

Shared September 21, 2016

The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition. Worse, students often believe they understand something when, in fact, they don’t.

Oz Lubling

Shared February 2, 2017

As studies of chess masters, emergency room physicians, and fighter pilots have shown, in times of critical stress, conscious analysis of a situation is replaced by quick, subconscious processing as these experts rapidly draw on their deeply ingrained repertoire of neural subroutines—chunks.

Supreeth S

Shared September 19, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Olli Sulopuisto

Shared September 26, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Muhammad Syarif Ali Akbarsyah

Shared September 23, 2016

This article shows how we correlate space beyond knowledges. One of the approach was impaired by an army

Czar Carbonel

Shared October 10, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Jasen Farmer

Shared September 25, 2016

Have to restart the @Coursera Learning to Learn course now! #chunking #learning @NautilusMag

Guilherme Silva

Shared September 17, 2016

As parents and teachers, we can use simple, accessible methods for deepening understanding and making it useful and flexible. We can encourage others and ourselves to try new disciplines that we thought were too hard—math, dance, physics, language, chemistry, music—opening new worlds for ourselves and others.

Santi Roman

Shared September 28, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Brian

Shared October 9, 2016

"The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition. Worse, students often believe they understand something when, in fact, they don’t. By championing the importance of understanding, teachers can inadvertently set their students up for failure as those students blunder in illusions of competence. As one (failing) engineering student recently told me: “I just don’t see how I could have done so poorly. I understood it when you taught it in class.” My student may have thought he’d understood it at the time, and perhaps he did, but he’d never practiced using the concept to truly internalize it. He had not developed any kind of procedural fluency or ability to apply what he thought he understood."

Brian

Shared October 9, 2016

"Fluency allows understanding to become embedded, emerging when needed."

Benjamin Ho

Shared February 2, 2017

Not enough to learn. Revise and repeat.

The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition.

Benjamin Ho

Shared February 2, 2017

The main lesson is to revise and practice.

"Looking back, I realize that I didn’t have to just blindly follow my initial inclinations and passions. The “fluency” part of me that loved literature and language was also the same part of me that ultimately fell in love with math and science—and transformed and enriched my life."

Iftekhar Inan

Shared September 30, 2016

Article like this is the reason why I devotedly read every issue of Nautil.us

Renee Chen

Shared February 25, 2017

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Mr. Thoro

Shared September 27, 2016

chunks were envisioned as the varying neural counterparts of different chess patterns. Gradually, neuroscientists came to realize that experts such as chess grand masters are experts because they have stored thousands of chunks of knowledge about their area of expertise in their long-term memory. Chess masters, for example, can recall tens of thousands of different chess patterns. Whatever the discipline, experts can call up to consciousness one or several of these well-knit-together, chunked neural subroutines to analyze and react to a new learning situation

Alex Chen

Shared September 18, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Muhammad Eimaduddin

Shared September 17, 2016

Barbara Oakley, creater of How to Learn course in Coursera

Haley Houseman

Shared October 12, 2016

Really enjoyed this marriage of how and way we learn

John Schipper

Shared January 29, 2017

Mind for Numbers: How to Excel at Math and Science (Even If
 You Flunked Algebra).

Muhammad Eimaduddin

Shared February 5, 2017

2nd time reading this. Still worth it.

shrankhla pandey

Shared January 27, 2017

Adult Neural Plasticity is well..not impossible...

Guy Anglade

Shared December 30, 2017

“As I look today at the shortage of science and math majors in this country, and our current trend in how we teach people to learn, and as I reflect on my own pathway, knowing what I know now about the brain, it occurs to me that we can do better. As parents and teachers, we can use simple, accessible methods for deepening understanding and making it useful and flexible. We can encourage others and ourselves to try new disciplines that we thought were too hard—math, dance, physics, language, chemistry, music—opening new worlds for ourselves and others.”

Alex Lo

Shared September 23, 2016

"Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding."

Shaun Williams

Shared November 3, 2016

takes her time to get to the point but really nice read.

Pekka Huhtala

Shared January 31, 2017

Wax on, wax off. Understanding is important but repetition/fluency is the key.

Nuel Sitanggang

Shared September 20, 2016

I have her ebook, but haven't read it yet .

Bryan Tan

Shared January 2, 2017

This article questions the adage that "to break the rules, one has to know the rules first", instead arguing in favor of the detested rote-learning. It is simply not enough to know, she posits, but rather we have to be fluent - true understanding comes from a fluency that is almost natural in its malleability. And how does this fluency come about? Through practice, practice, and practice.

Andrew Haslam

Shared September 24, 2016

Fascinating!

David Cullinan

Shared September 17, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding.

Kai F.

Shared January 30, 2017

勤学苦练说?或者我理解错了

The Rambling Teapot Yusuf

Shared December 28, 2016

The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition. Worse, students often believe they understand something when, in fact, they don’t. By championing the importance of understanding, teachers can inadvertently set their students up for failure as those students blunder in illusions of competence.

Grace Jaucian

Shared November 16, 2017

@languagemajors

Joshwin Greene

Shared September 20, 2016

Great article.

Cristiana Martin

Shared September 29, 2016

Definetely one of my all time favorite stories! Must read!

Maarten Meijer

Shared September 19, 2016

with

Desiree Yourczek

Shared February 23, 2017

Best article I've read on #metalearning

Nghi Le Vinh

Shared September 30, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Nghi Le Vinh

Shared September 30, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Nghi Le Vinh

Shared September 30, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Hasan Hasan

Shared October 10, 2016

conjugating

Ezra

Shared October 8, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Leanne W

Shared February 13, 2017

"Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency."

Mark Downey

Shared September 16, 2016

The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition.

Pranav Pallod

Shared September 19, 2016

How to learn Math and Science even if you Flunked at Algebra!
Must Read

Libby Cheney

Shared October 10, 2016

Toward new horizons...

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Ash Christie

Shared November 7, 2016

Great article that sheds light on the learning process.

Pammy Chua

Shared November 16, 2017

Fluency of something whole like a language requires a kind of familiarity that only repeated and varied interaction with the parts can develop. Where my language classmates had often been content to concentrate on simply understanding Russian they heard or read, I instead tried to gain an internalized, deep-rooted fluency with the words and language structure. I wouldn’t just be satisfied to know that понимать meant “to understand.” I’d practice with the verb—putting it through its paces by conjugating it repeatedly with all sorts of tenses, and then moving on to putting it into sentences, and then finally to understanding not only when to use this form of the verb, but also when not to use it. I practiced recalling all these aspects and variations quickly. After all, through practice, you can understand and translate dozens—even thousands— of words in another language. But if you aren’t fluent, when someone throws a bunch of words at you quickly, as with normal speaking (which always sounds horrifically fast when you’re learning a new language), you have no idea what they’re actually saying, even though technically you understand all the component words and structure.

Jennifer Lee

Shared September 29, 2016

In other words, in science and math education in particular, it’s easy to slip into teaching methods that emphasize understanding and that avoid the sometimes painful repetition and practice that underlie fluency. I learned Russian not just by understanding it—understanding, after all, is facile, and can easily slip away. (What did that word понимать mean?) I learned Russian by gaining fluency through practice, repetition, and rote learning—but rote learning that emphasized the ability to think flexibly and quickly. I learned math and science by applying precisely those same ideas.

Nik Ahmad Faisal Kamarolzaman

Shared February 19, 2017

Math class be like : Step 1. Calculate. Step 2. ...and memorize the step

Aboli Chavan

Shared September 19, 2016

Totally recommended!

Fitri

Shared September 27, 2016

The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition.

Василий Ковальчук

Shared October 10, 2016

Working for the Russians was fun and engrossing—but it was also a superficially glamorous form of migrant work. You go to sea during fishing season, make a decent salary while getting drunk all the time, then go back to port when the season’s over and hope they’ll rehire you next year.

CAL

Shared September 20, 2016

Language learning provided the fundamentals of neuroplasticity

Thara Muangthong

Shared September 26, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding.

Mike Walmsley

Shared September 18, 2016

The problem with focusing relentlessly on understanding is that math and science students can often grasp essentials of an important idea, but this understanding can quickly slip away without consolidation through practice and repetition.

Valeria Molero

Shared October 29, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding.

Ernesto Ricci

Shared October 31, 2016

Lettura interessante, è la storia di una americana che prima si è laureata in lingue e poi, sia per trovare lavoro, sia per mettersi in gioco, si si iscrive a Ingegneria (diventando poi docente universitaria). Interessante ad es. perché dice che tendiamo a privilegiare la parte di comprensione e a disprezzare lo studio mnemonico, quando il secondo aiuta invece molto la comprensione. Da far leggere alla tua figlia che non si sente portata per la matematica!

Anna K

Shared January 30, 2017

Say "I'm not gifted for math" one more time. Or something about girls' lesser abilities.

Mitch Fernandez

Shared September 15, 2016

Not sure my wife would agree with everything here, but the more I study about learning, the more I see the same themes coming up. Interesting parallels here to my own experience (former Russian linguist who taught himself advanced math much later in life).

David Friml

Shared September 16, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

Navkiran Rayait

Shared September 17, 2016

Really good one.

Jorge Mendes

Shared September 17, 2016

I recomend also Barbara's book "a mind for Numbers" and her coursera course "learning how to learn"

Jagwarrx X

Shared September 18, 2016

wouldn’t just be satisfied to know that понимать meant “to understand.” I’d practice with the verb—putting it through its paces by conjugating it repeatedly with all sorts of tenses, and then moving on to putting it into sentences, and then finally to understanding not only when to use this form of the verb, but also when not to use it. I practiced recalling all these aspects and variations quickly.

Akshat Agrawal

Shared January 18, 2017

A simple approach focussing on the correct attitude to learn anything in life. Mastery can be only gained by practice and therr is no other short cut to it. Beautifully penned down article by the author on the importance of practice.

This approach—which focused on fluency instead of simple understanding—put me at the top of the class.

Barbara Plasencia

Shared April 6, 2017

Some interesting facts for those who would like to rewire their brain to become fluent in Math

Russell Dunn

Shared November 20, 2018

Fluency is not a bad thing!

gs Saldanha

Shared March 4, 2017

"fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency."

Brent Prazak

Shared September 21, 2016

Changed the way I think about how to learn

Anupam

Shared October 29, 2016

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding.

锦浩 王

Shared September 17, 2016

Time after time, professors in mathematics and the sciences have told me that building well-ingrained chunks of expertise through practice and repetition was absolutely vital to their success. Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency.

锦浩 王

Shared September 17, 2016

What I had done in learning Russian was to emphasize not just understanding of the language, but fluency. Fluency of something whole like a language requires a kind of familiarity that only repeated and varied interaction with the parts can develop. Where my language classmates had often been content to concentrate on simply understanding Russian they heard or read, I instead tried to gain an internalized, deep-rooted fluency with the words and language structure. I wouldn’t just be satisfied to know that понимать meant “to understand.” I’d practice with the verb—putting it through its paces by conjugating it repeatedly with all sorts of tenses, and then moving on to putting it into sentences, and then finally to understanding not only when to use this form of the verb, but also when not to use it. I practiced recalling all these aspects and variations quickly. After all, through practice, you can understand and translate dozens—even thousands— of words in another language. But if you aren’t fluent, when someone throws a bunch of words at you quickly, as with normal speaking (which always sounds horrifically fast when you’re learning a new language), you have no idea what they’re actually saying, even though technically you understand all the component words and structure. And you certainly can’t speak quickly enough yourself for native speakers to find it enjoyable to listen to you.

Dil Bath

Shared November 15, 2016

to

Christian Arentsen

Shared October 18, 2016

Amazing and very inspiring!

Ryan Fadholi

Shared September 21, 2016

FYI, penulisnya juga instruktur course "Learning How to Learn" di Coursera.

Both the article and the course is recommended!

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency

James Long Truong

Shared January 29, 2017

Fluency of something whole like a language requires a kind of familiarity that only repeated and varied interaction with the parts can develop.

Daniel Andersen

Shared August 18, 2017

understanding, after all, is facile, and can easily slip away.

Daniel Andersen

Shared August 18, 2017

Understanding doesn’t build fluency; instead, fluency builds understanding. In fact, I believe that true understanding of a complex subject comes only from fluency

Donna Allen

Shared September 28, 2018

Keep for future reference.