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Marcela Sapone

Shared December 26, 2016

I watched both of my grandparents pass this year, within weeks of each other. A last lesson of the power of love

Although medical researchers may not be able to pinpoint where that surge of willpower comes from, they have shown evidence for people’s remarkable ability to hold on and let go at will.

Sam Diss

Shared May 24, 2017

<\3

Phidelia Imiegha

Shared March 22, 2017

The idea that grief can increase the risk of dying makes intuitive sense, especially among those who spend time with the ill.

Phidelia Imiegha

Shared March 22, 2017

he idea that grief can increase the risk of dying makes intuitive sense, especially among those who spend time with the ill.

Marina Levy

Shared March 19, 2017

<<Será possível que um coração partido cause sua morte?>>

Segundo este artigo, sim.

(segundo experiência própria, sim)
Não é à toa que sinto aperto e dor no coração quando estou triste e/ou ansiosa...numa crise de ansiedade intensa, sempre sinto que estou prestes a ter um ataque cardíaco e, consequentemente, morrer. Por isso, também, é que me sinto tão esgotada depois de experimentar uma situação dessas (cada vez mais frequentes). Só penso em deitar e dormir pra sempre.

Adil Majid

Shared October 10, 2017

“Studies from around the world have confirmed that people have an increased risk of dying in the weeks and months after their spouses pass away.”

Melissa Kim

Shared January 11, 2017

READ IF YOU FEEL LIKE CRYING!!!

For years, Knapke says, she and her siblings watched their father’s health crumble. He suffered from longstanding heart problems and had begun showing signs of dementia. He lost interest in things he once enjoyed, and dozed nearly all the time. “We asked each other, why do you suppose he’s still here? The only thing we could come up with was that he was here for Mom,” she says. “He’d wake up from a long snooze and ask, ‘How’s your mother?’ ”

Rex Arul

Shared December 21, 2016

The emotional devastation of losing a loved one can certainly feel like physical pain

Rex Arul

Shared December 21, 2016

But can you really die from a broken heart? As it turns out, you can, from “broken-heart syndrome,”

Rex Arul

Shared December 21, 2016

41 percent increase in the risk of death in the first six months after losing a spouse

Rex Arul

Shared December 21, 2016

magnitude of the “widowhood effect” was much stronger for men than it was for women

Rex Arul

Shared December 21, 2016

Unlike a heart attack, broken-heart syndrome doesn’t stem from blocked arteries

Rex Arul

Shared December 21, 2016

Grief can affect the heart in less immediate ways

Rex Arul

Shared December 21, 2016

acute emotional stress can cause a variety of problems with the heart

Rex Arul

Shared December 21, 2016

Although medical researchers may not be able to pinpoint where that surge of willpower comes from, they have shown evidence for people’s remarkable ability to hold on and let go at will

Rex Arul

Shared December 21, 2016

Clasping hands with a loved one tamps down threat-related activity

Kris Tozkousne

Shared July 1, 2017

O vztahu našich vztahů a psychického i fyzického zdraví aneb Proč přátelům pomáhat najít lásku 😇

Nana Salaudeen

Shared October 18, 2017

stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

ahmed abdul fatah

Shared May 18, 2017

short answer : Yes

Salonee Sanghvi

Shared December 19, 2016

Guess you can die from a broken heart after all

Boris Desmond

Shared January 10, 2017

A good, heartfelt read.

Yuk Yu, Alison LEE

Shared February 8, 2018

When you lose a partner, you really do lose a part of yourself. You also lose a piece of your coping mechanism for dealing with life’s difficulties, Coan says. “You have to adjust your stress response. You’re going to be withdrawing resources from your immune-system, and your body is going to take a big hit.”

Godiva Golding

Shared March 3, 2018

Really appreciated the scientific perspective on love. Makes the idea of love slightly more appealing

Mihai Dumitrescu

Shared January 3, 2017

Good one.

Gary Katz

Shared June 27, 2017

Can't be ruled out.

Applause Testing

Shared September 1, 2017

Ugh but

when Doc was stationed in Germany. After he returned their romance began in earnest. They married, raised six children and celebrated 65 anniversaries together. And then on a single day in August 2013, in the room they shared in an Ohio nursing home, they died.

“No relationship was ever perfect, but theirs was one of the better relationships I ever observed,” says their daughter Margaret Knapke, 61, a somatic therapist. “They were always like Velcro. They couldn’t stand to be separated.”

For years, Knapke says, she and her siblings watched their father’s health crumble. He suffered from longstanding heart problems and had begun showing signs of dementia. He lost interest in things he once enjoyed, and dozed nearly all the time. “We asked each other, why

Applause Testing

Shared September 1, 2017

Chubby

dying in the weeks and months after their spouses pass away. In 2011, researchers from Harvard University and the University of Yamanashi, Tokyo pooled the results of 15 different studies, with data on more than 2.2 million people. They estimated a 41 percent increase in the risk of death in the first six months after losing a spouse. The effect didn’t just apply to the elderly. People under 65 were as likely to die in the months following a spouse’s death as those over 65. The magnitude of the “widowhood effect” was much stronger for men than it was for women.

The explanation for the gender difference may be simple logistics. Particularly in previous generations, women did more of the work caring for their husbands

Applause Testing

Shared September 1, 2017

Vyybubhiuh

weeks and months after their spouses pass away. In 2011, researchers from Harvard University and the University of Yamanashi, Tokyo pooled the results of 15 different studies, with data on more than 2.2 million people. They estimated a 41 percent increase in the risk of death in the first six months after losing a spouse. The effect didn’t just apply to the elderly. People under 65 were as likely to die in the months following a spouse’s death as those over 65. The magnitude of the “widowhood effect” was much stronger for men than it was for women.

Julie Bittner

Shared December 10, 2017

Extremely interesting article! When my son and his wife and stepson were murdered, my fear of dying decreased by 90%, the other 10% is fearing the unknown.

Julie Bittner

Shared March 31, 2018

I'm almost positive that I posted this before but it is worth reposting.

William Wells

Shared January 8, 2017

The body’s complex fight-or-flight reaction doesn’t come cheap. To launch the chemical cascade that allows you to outrun a bear or a burglar, the body has to borrow resources from other body systems. “One of the places your body can draw a lot of bioenergetic resources from is the immune system,” says Coan. “When you have chronic stress, you’re constantly degrading your ability to heal and fight off infection. That’s why chronic stress is associated with so many bad health outcomes.”

Ezgi Erdal

Shared December 16, 2017

No words needed..

Srg Kas

Shared December 20, 2016

people nearing the end seem to be able to choose to live for another day to satisfy a loved one.

Srg Kas

Shared December 21, 2016

"When you lose a partner, you really do lose a part of yourself. You also lose a piece of your coping mechanism for dealing with life’s difficulties..."

Death by heartbreak is a literary staple; even Shakespeare wrote of “deadly grief.” The emotional devastation of losing a loved one can certainly feel like physical pain.

Tarun Avasthy

Shared January 12, 2017

Damn son

Melissa Mae

Shared March 22, 2017

i already knew this but so many people dont.

Shannon Lee

Shared June 11, 2017

this was an amazing articlr

Sara W

Shared June 11, 2017

yup.. but what I have read is people who do, that their heart is more likely (structurally) built in a way that makes it easier to die from a broken heart. A broken heart is when a vessel/artery expands like a balloon then rapidly blows leaving a crack.
It can happen because of a good surprise, like a good shock of a surprise 90th bday party, a grandchild being born, the first time you fall truly in love..

Luong Van

Shared July 4, 2017

staple

Danilo Cunha

Shared July 19, 2017

Que loucura mano

'Damilare Kilanko

Shared August 3, 2017

Yes, you can't.

Aneesh Thakur

Shared October 16, 2017

vach...

Michelle King

Shared December 6, 2017

This made me cry................

Michelle King

Shared December 6, 2017

This made me cry......

Dani M.

Shared January 6, 2018

"Death by heartbreak is a literary staple; even Shakespeare wrote of “deadly grief.” The emotional devastation of losing a loved one can certainly feel like physical pain. But can you really die from a broken heart? As it turns out, you can, from “broken-heart syndrome,” also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Studies of bereavement, in fact, provide another harsh indictment of the effects of stress on human health. But deadly grief is not about stress alone, scientists say. It shines a light on the physiological bonds of love, ceded to us by evolution, so often best understood when broken.

Studies from around the world have confirmed that people have an increased risk of dying in the weeks and months after their spouses pass away. In 2011, researchers from Harvard University and the University of Yamanashi, Tokyo pooled the results of 15 different studies, with data on more than 2.2 million people. They estimated a 41 percent increase in the risk of death in the first six months after losing a spouse. The effect didn’t just apply to the elderly. People under 65 were as likely to die in the months following a spouse’s death as those over 65."

Death by heartbreak is a literary staple; even Shakespeare wrote of “deadly grief.” The emotional devastation of losing a loved one can certainly feel like physical pain. But can you really die from a broken heart? As it turns out, you can, from “broken-heart syndrome,” also known as stress-induced cardiomyopathy. Studies of bereavement, in fact, provide another harsh indictment of the effects of stress on human health. But deadly grief is not about stress alone, scientists say. It shines a light on the physiological bonds of love, ceded to us by evolution, so often best understood when broken.

Studies from around the world have confirmed that people have an increased risk of dying in the weeks and months after their spouses pass away. In 2011, researchers from Harvard University and the University of Yamanashi, Tokyo pooled the results of 15 different studies, with data on more than 2.2 million people. They estimated a 41 percent increase in the risk of death in the first six months after losing a spouse. The effect didn’t just apply to the elderly. People under 65 were as likely to die in the months following a spouse’s death as those over 65.

Joe Herron

Shared January 14, 2018

finish reading

mrunal ladde

Shared April 27, 2018

traumatizing eh?

Hany Abdelfattah

Shared June 3, 2017

Studies from around the world have confirmed that people have an increased risk of dying in the weeks and months after their spouses pass away

Tinga Bandy

Shared January 1, 2017

these

bbolds

Shared February 15, 2017

Deep!!!

Joy Jowdy

Shared March 19, 2017

wow

Julia Julee

Shared May 17, 2017

Good

Vince Sheena

Shared July 23, 2017

Yes.

JOSE ALBA

Shared July 26, 2017

PROBANDO

Dwi Prihandi

Shared September 1, 2017

uuuuuuiuiiiuo.iib

Joje Bungalows

Shared September 11, 2017

f

B Bonnyronnie

Shared September 25, 2017

and

braden Music

Shared October 17, 2017

yes I think that You can die from a broken heart if you do not take care of your heart that much then yes you can die from your broken heart

Drema Stracke

Shared December 9, 2017

I definitely believe soo!!!

Nia Bolland

Shared December 16, 2017

I love this.

Ware Wolff

Shared December 20, 2017

Yes you can...I feel dead...

Collin

Shared January 8, 2018

Jui Xx

Shared April 24, 2018

i'd thought about this concept before but it feels amazing to know that it's a truth. Just makes you think though will love be the best and worst thing that'll ever happen to me?

Bitopon Bora

Shared April 30, 2018

she says. “I feel he chose to go first so he could help her. It was definitely an act of love on his part.” she says. “I feel he chose to go first so he could help her. It was definitely an act of love on his part.” she says. “I feel he chose to go first so he could help her. It was definitely an act of love on his part.”

Bitopon Bora

Shared April 30, 2018

she says. “I feel he chose to go first so he could help her. It was definitely an act of love on his part.”

dhia-hak hamouda

Shared June 4, 2018

xw,c

Universe Within

Shared July 6, 2018

Yes. Socially it's a topic many are in denial.. I believe people do not want to feel any responsibility as to how their actions may have contributed to a person's sassiness. . We are a walk away society. Everything in life can be disposed of without conscious. People in our country, the USA wash their hands of every and anything..

Mohamed Sabri Ben Chaabane

Shared July 11, 2018

Schroepfer will never forget when one of her hospice patients was hovering at the edge of death. She was unconscious, barely hanging on. Her children had all told their mother it was okay to let go. But the woman’s grieving husband hadn’t been able to give his blessing. Finally, after talking with his daughter, he decided he was ready to give his wife permission to leave them. “He sat down beside her and told her he loved her, and that it was okay,” Schroepfer recalls. “He got up to walk back to his chair. Right after he sat down, she raised her head out of the coma, said ‘I love you,’ and died. I was glad their daughter was there too, or I would have thought I’d imagined it.”

Chris Lamb

Shared 3 days ago

Ohh Blessss!!

Cindy Stephens

Shared December 25, 2017

This article supports what most health care professionals (who work in Hospice or not in Hospice) have known about and experienced first hand. When I was a Hospice nurse, I would feel like I was there to prepare the family members and get them "ready" for the death/dying experience. Over 90% of my patients did not pass away until his or her significant people in his or her life had come to terms with his or her death. As soon as everybody was as ready as they would ever be, my patient's would let go and pass away with such beauty and grace with a peaceful smile on his or her face.

Rick Bryant

Shared January 2, 2017

Interesting