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This is one of the most-saved, read, and shared stories on Pocket.

Recommendations from Pocket Users

Will Humphries

Shared February 18, 2017

For #Whiskey lovers and novices.

Akshay Ratan

Shared December 17, 2016

Wow! I admire whiskey even more now :D

Comfie Ebong

Shared February 22, 2017

This one's for you Martin....

Tejas Bagrecha

Shared March 23, 2017

Ok. Now that's new!

Manpreet Kaur

Shared February 4, 2017

Well, how could I not recommend this! 😁🙈

Andy Hartup

Shared January 18, 2017

Too good

Justin Edward

Shared April 19, 2017

Thank you ☝☝☝

Justin Chick

Shared December 19, 2016

Required reading

Helen Stonehouse

Shared December 21, 2016

for Niall, perhaps.

Magnus Reuter

Shared March 27, 2017

About the understanding of all ingredients of Whisky.

Kammi Katze

Shared December 17, 2016

6 76 zu

Kammi Katze

Shared December 17, 2016

Das 6 76

Kammi Katze

Shared December 17, 2016

6

Veronica W

Shared December 23, 2016

"The magic a particular distillery has, you'll never be able to recreate it," says Bill Thomas, proprietor of noted whiskey bar Jack Rose Dining Saloon in Washington, D.C., and foremost, a hardcore whiskey geek. "All of these factors came together and were magic for a period of time."

Robb Ranney

Shared January 1, 2017

The more you know

Althea Lau

Shared January 4, 2017

All about whiskey👍🏻👍🏻

Mohit Dayal

Shared January 27, 2017

interesting

Susan OBrien

Shared February 13, 2017

Wow... who knew. I like Maker's Mark.

Mason Fantasia

Shared March 4, 2017

Just a good ol read to understanding a little more about a dear old friend

Jeff Handler

Shared February 16, 2017

Nth,th

Ger Ro

Shared April 20, 2017

England drink not my favorite

Otto Abisz

Shared April 25, 2017

Its all about enjoyment

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

"thirsty angel's share"

The hotter the temperature, the more alcohol penetrates the wood of the barrels, and the thirstier the angel's share.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

The seasonal temperature fluctuation in, say, Kentucky allows barrels to "breathe" in and out—contracting in the cool of the winter, and expanding in the heat of the summer—whereas the steadier weather in Scotland offers far more year-round climate consistency.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

Masataka Taketsuru, founder of Japan's Nikka Whisky, chose the location of his Yoichi distillery in the Hokkaido Prefecture because of the region's similar weather conditions to Scotland.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

Taiwan's Kavalan has garnered worldwide acclaim while aging its whiskies for a fraction of the period that its Scottish competitors do, thanks to their hot, humid climate.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

I kinda like the idea of succumbing to the whims of the weather better. Feels more real (but that doesn't really have an effect on the taste)

This approach allows for more micromanaging of the aging process, as opposed to willfully succumbing to the whims of the weather.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

Rotating to account for differences in location within a room (hot air on top, chilly corners, etc.)

At Maker's Mark, for instance, the brand follows a schedule where all barrels are aged on the top floor of a warehouse for three summers, before rotating to the bottom floors for approximately three to four more years.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

the size of a barrel determines the level of exposure a spirit has to the wood. Smaller barrels impart faster aging

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

The standard across major American whiskey producers is the 53-gallon barrel.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

Many of the newer, smaller producers across the country though utilize 30-gallon barrels or even smaller sizes to help them age their wares in less time.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

By definition, bourbon must be aged in new charred American oak barrels.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

the charring process is what enables the vanillin compounds within the wood to provide bourbon's signature vanilla and caramel sweetness.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

First-fill barrels, which have only been previously used once, second-fill barrels, previously used twice, and those used repeatedly beyond that, all offer varied levels of their original flavors.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

Staves are the individual pieces of wood used in the construction, or "raising" of a new barrel, and they too play a role.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

Grain + yeast + water = whiskey.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

The mash bill of a whiskey is the ratio of grains it includes. Bourbon must incorporate a minimum of 51 percent corn, rye must utilize at least 51 percent rye grain, and different types of whiskey have other requirements.

Kelly M

Shared June 16, 2017

The mash bill for a single malt Scotch is by definition 100 percent malted barley.

Raymond Lazarus

Shared June 16, 2017

Lets talk about whiskey when we meet next !!!

Kelly M

Shared June 20, 2017

Bourbons traditionally incorporate three grains: corn, rye and malted barley. A simplified explanation offers corn as the base, rye as providing extra flavor, and malted barley providing the enzymes to feed the fermentation process.

Kelly M

Shared June 20, 2017

the yeast strain used for fermentation will undoubtedly be cited as one of that brand's special characteristics.

Kelly M

Shared June 20, 2017

pure water -> better whiskey

In Japan, Suntory's distilleries were located precisely for their pure water supplies, both designated by the Japanese government as amongst the "most precious" water sources in the country, created by "the filtration of rain and snow through thousand-year-old granite rocks."

Kelly M

Shared June 20, 2017

The Macallan is famously tight with their cuts, incorporating only 16 percent of the distillate.

Distilleries have to control what part of the distillate actually makes it into the barrel. The liquid flowing from the still can be broken down into what's known as heads, which are poisonous, hearts, which is the cleanest, tastiest portion, and tails, which begin to impart reduced quality of flavor.

How tight or loose a distiller is with his cuts directly changes the raw spirit that fills the barrel.

Pat O'Brian

Shared July 14, 2017

I thought that this article was interesting. We've taken tours at Jack Daniels and Makers Mark distilleries and have learned a little bit about the processes, but this article speaks more to the infinite number of variables that affect the outcome in the distillation process. It's worth a read if whiskey is your thing.

Matthew Kochan

Shared July 21, 2017

Whiskey Guide

Juncheng Zhang

Shared August 30, 2017

First test of pocket。

surya verma

Shared September 9, 2017

brand's special characteristics. "Our yeast is very important to our flavor profile," says Morris, touting yeast strain "Woodford Reserve 78B" as he cites what is an oft-repeated theme from one company to the next.

At Wild Turkey, the same yeast has been

Meem Sarkar

Shared March 4, 2017

Well, making whiskey is always more complex than making wine