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My Joy List: Angelina Spicer

The comedian and “accidental activist” shares her favorite Twitter feed, the site she wishes she’d had as a new mom, and more.

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Think back to the last time the internet brought you joy. We want to put more of those moments at your fingertips—whether it’s a favorite podcast episode, heartwarming personal essay, or reliably fantastic recipe. So we’re introducing a series of Joy Lists from writers, artists, and people we admire.

As a stand-up comedian, Angelina Spicer is a pro at mining humor from everyday life. It’s a talent she’s brought to Conan, Funny or Die, and her popular TikTok account—you do not want to miss her bit on unexpected visitors during quarantine.

She’s also managed to bring that same level of hilarity to her struggle with mental health, specifically her time at a psychiatric facility for treatment of postpartum depression. But it wasn’t enough for Spicer to let that experience influence her comedy; it fueled a turn to activism. Putting her platform and wit to work, she’s spent the last several years working to bust stigmas around postpartum depression, raise awareness, and advocate for more government support for Black maternal health.

Currently at work on an upcoming documentary, The Push for Permission, Spicer took time out to share the podcasts, Twitter accounts, and cocktail recipe that she relies on for regular doses of joy.

“She's All That” Recap [LISTEN]

Adderall and Compliments

Angelina Spicer: “This episode of Adderall & Compliments got me THA-RU! Got me through the first three months of quarantine when I wanted to quit homeschooling, quit working, and quit life! This pod brought me so much joy when they covered all of the Housewives drama and messy tabloids stuff, but now, with these throwback movie recaps, I am feelin’ all the nostalgia and falling in love with old movies again!”

@JMScomedy

Twitter

AS: “My Comedy BFF Jessica Michelle Singleton has THE best Twitter fingers on the planet. Don’t worry, she’s no keyboard gangster, she comes in peace. Her jokes about her mom’s lazy eye, sperm donor dad, and her rabid dog will give you a welcome respite from your own drama and make you laugh at hers.”

Black Women Lead

AS: “Black Women Lead saved so many after the killing of George Floyd last year. They provided community, support, and a platform for artists and activists to share information on how to learn and do more to support Black Lives. Their events are amazing and sometimes even include celebs like Tiffany Haddish and Sinbad!”

Rubirosa Cocktail Recipe

Talero

AS: “Since I was stuck at home trying to avoid Covid, I decided to take up a new hobby. Some folks got creative with sewing, gardening, or baking. My hobby? Drinking. Don’t worry, I didn’t drink every night. But I drank enough to try out my fair share of tequila recipes from my favorite (Black owned!) brand, Talero. This one right here, the Rubirosa, became my Quarantine King!”

Angelina Spicer

Angelina Spicer is a comedian, social media influencer and “accidental activist”. A cum-laude graduate of Howard University, Spicer has smartly delved deep for comedy that’s authentic. Her original content has garnered a staggering 89 million views in more than 45 countries. In 2017, she became an outspoken advocate for maternal mental health after her diagnosis and hospitalization of postpartum depression (PPD). Not only is Spicer using her voice in comedy clubs across the country, she is also working with lawmakers in California and on Capitol Hill to implement laws to support early motherhood. Spicer has worked with some of the world’s most trusted organizations like Cedars Sinai Hospital, Postpartum Support International, the World Health Organization and has been featured in USA Today, NPR, and was named Essence Magazine’s Woke 100. Spicer is currently in production on The Push For Permission, a feature length documentary that uses comedy to empower women to advocate for themselves and to normalize PPD.