Jasmine Wynona

Future Jeopardy contestant.

7 Followers | 19 Following

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Jasmine Wynona

1 minute ago

Antisocial media: why I decided to cut back on Facebook and Instagram

theguardian.com

Jasmine Wynona

10 minutes ago

We should never have told people to take vitamins — and a new study shows why

businessinsider.com

Jasmine Wynona

13 minutes ago

Take it from me, a Buddhist monk: cleaning is good for you

theguardian.com

Jasmine Wynona

18 minutes ago

You’re Wasting Your Spare Time And It’s Killing Your Success

medium.com

Jasmine Wynona

25 minutes ago

How do you know when you love someone?

medium.com

Jasmine Wynona

4 hours ago

The Secret Sexual History of the Barre Workout

thecut.com

Jasmine Wynona

10 hours ago

A Psychological Explanation for Why Compliments Are So Embarrassing

thecut.com

Jasmine Wynona

23 hours ago

'Entire aisles are empty': Whole Foods employees reveal why stores are facing a crisis of food shortages

businessinsider.com

Jasmine Wynona

1 day ago

Donald Trump’s Radical Honesty

nytimes.com

Jasmine Wynona

2 days ago

Pop Culture’s Great Awokening

thecut.com

Jasmine Wynona

4 days ago

The Case for Using a Paper Planner

nytimes.com

Jasmine Wynona

6 days ago

Sea salt around the world is contaminated by plastic, studies show

theguardian.com

Jasmine Wynona

6 days ago

Aziz Ansari Is Guilty. Of Not Being a Mind Reader.

nytimes.com

Jasmine Wynona

7 days ago

The Strange Brands in Your Instagram Feed

theatlantic.com

Jasmine Wynona

7 days ago

Just Eat More Fiber

theatlantic.com

Jasmine Wynona

7 days ago

52 Places to Go in 2018

nytimes.com

Jasmine Wynona

9 days ago

Inside the Hollywood Home of Social Media’s Stars. (Don’t Be Shy.)

nytimes.com

Jasmine Wynona

9 days ago

"Trump is not committed to that wall on principle. He is committed only to looking good as a result of whatever comes of it. Mexico is never going to pay for it, and he knows it. He has always known it. That was just another lie. Someone must have stuck the phrases “chain migration” and “diversity lottery” into his brain — easy buzzwords, you see — and he can now rail against those ideas for applause lines.But he is completely malleable on actual immigration policy. He doesn’t have the stamina for that much reading. Learning about immigration would require reading more words than would fit on a television news chyron.If Donald Trump follows through with what he said during that meeting, his base will once again be betrayed. He will have proved once again that he was saying anything to keep them angry, even telling lies. He will have demonstrated once again his incompetence and unfitness.And once again, they won’t care.That is because Trump is man-as-message, man-as-messiah. Trump support isn’t philosophical but theological.

Trumpism is a religion founded on patriarchy and white supremacy."

Trump is not committed to that wall on principle. He is committed only to looking good as a result of whatever comes of it. Mexico is never going to pay for it, and he knows it. He has always known it. That was just another lie. Someone must have stuck the phrases “chain migration” and “diversity lottery” into his brain — easy buzzwords, you see — and he can now rail against those ideas for applause lines.But he is completely malleable on actual immigration policy. He doesn’t have the stamina for that much reading. Learning about immigration would require reading more words than would fit on a television news chyron.If Donald Trump follows through with what he said during that meeting, his base will once again be betrayed. He will have proved once again that he was saying anything to keep them angry, even telling lies. He will have demonstrated once again his incompetence and unfitness.And once again, they won’t care.That is because Trump is man-as-message, man-as-messiah. Trump support isn’t philosophical but theological.

Trumpism is a religion founded on patriarchy and white supremacy.

‘The Lowest White Man’

nytimes.com

Jasmine Wynona

9 days ago

Oprah Winfrey Helped Create Our American Fantasyland

slate.com

Jasmine Wynona

11 days ago

Shame on you

aeon.co

Jasmine Wynona

14 days ago

If you needed more proof that sleep, with its peculiar many-staged structure and tendency to fill your mind with nonsense, isn’t some passive, energy-saving state, consider that golden hamsters have been observed waking up from bouts of hibernation—in order to nap. Whatever they’re getting from sleep, it’s not available to them while they’re hibernating. Even though they have slowed down nearly every process in their body, sleep pressure still builds up. “What I want to know is, what about this brain activity is so important?” says Kasper Vogt, one of the researchers gathered at the new institute at Tsukuba. He gestures at his screen, showing data on the firing of neurons in sleeping mice. “What is so important that you risk being eaten, not eating yourself, procreation ... you give all that up, for this?”
If you needed more proof that sleep, with its peculiar many-staged structure and tendency to fill your mind with nonsense, isn’t some passive, energy-saving state, consider that golden hamsters have been observed waking up from bouts of hibernation—in order to nap. Whatever they’re getting from sleep, it’s not available to them while they’re hibernating. Even though they have slowed down nearly every process in their body, sleep pressure still builds up. “What I want to know is, what about this brain activity is so important?” says Kasper Vogt, one of the researchers gathered at the new institute at Tsukuba. He gestures at his screen, showing data on the firing of neurons in sleeping mice. “What is so important that you risk being eaten, not eating yourself, procreation ... you give all that up, for this?”

Why Do We Need to Sleep?

theatlantic.com

Jasmine Wynona

14 days ago

Millennials may be history’s most competent parents. Here’s why.

blog.winnie.com

Jasmine Wynona

15 days ago

Is Something Neurologically Wrong With Donald Trump?

theatlantic.com

Jasmine Wynona

19 days ago

Robots Will Transform Fast Food

theatlantic.com

Jasmine Wynona

19 days ago

#RawWater

Silicon Valley’s Next Big Idea: Untreated Drinking Water

fortune.com

Jasmine Wynona

19 days ago

Millennials Are the Perfectionist Generation

thecut.com

Jasmine Wynona

20 days ago

No Wonder Millennials Hate Capitalism

nytimes.com

Jasmine Wynona

30 days ago

The Year That Skin Care Became a Coping Mechanism

newyorker.com

Jasmine Wynona

31 days ago

You’ll Never Be Famous — And That’s O.K.

nytimes.com

Jasmine Wynona

31 days ago

"The 2010s, in contrast, are a terrible time to not be brainy. Those who consider themselves bright openly mock others for being less so. Even in this age of rampant concern over microaggressions and victimization, we maintain open season on the nonsmart. People who’d swerve off a cliff rather than use a pejorative for race, religion, physical appearance, or disability are all too happy to drop the s‑bomb: Indeed, degrading others for being “stupid” has become nearly automatic in all forms of disagreement."

The War on Stupid People

theatlantic.com

Jasmine Wynona

36 days ago

These Are The 8 Friends You Need To Be Happy In Life

bakadesuyo.com

Jasmine Wynona

36 days ago

!!!

Mouthwash may kill beneficial bacteria in mouth and trigger diabetes, Harvard study suggests 

telegraph.co.uk

Jasmine Wynona

39 days ago

The Autistic Children Who Are Labeled As Sex Offenders

broadly.vice.com

Jasmine Wynona

42 days ago

Good read. Depressing read. And reminds me of "Captain Planet."

When Will The Planet Be Too Hot For Humans? Much, Much Sooner Than You Imagine.

nymag.com

Jasmine Wynona

45 days ago

In that incident, UW raised tuition by 5.5 percent six years in a row after 2007. The school blamed stresses from the financial crisis and decreased state aid. But when pressed during a state committee hearing in 2013 about the university's finances, UW system president Kevin Reilly admitted they held $648 million in reserve, including $414 million in tuition payments. This was excess hidey-hole cash the school was sitting on, separate and distinct from, say, an endowment fund.

After the university was showered with criticism for hoarding cash at a time when it was gouging students with huge price increases every year, the school responded by saying, essentially, it only did what all the other kids were doing. UW released data showing that other major state-school systems across the country were similarly stashing huge amounts of cash. While Wisconsin's surplus was only 25 percent of its operating budget, for instance, Minnesota's was 29 percent, and Illinois maintained a whopping 34 percent reserve.

When Collinge, of Student Loan Justice, looked into it, he found that the phenomenon wasn't confined to state schools. Private schools, too, have been hoarding cash even as they plead poverty and jack up tuition fees. "They're all doing it," he says.

While universities sit on their stockpiles of cash and the loan industry generates record profits, the pain of living in debilitating debt for many lasts into retirement. Take Veronica Martish. She's a 68-year-old veteran, having served in the armed forces in the Vietnam era. She's also a grandmother who's never been in trouble and consid
ers herself a patriot. "The thing is, I tried to do everything right in my life," she says. "But this ruined my life."

This is an $8,000 student loan she took out in 1989, through Sallie Mae. She borrowed the money so she could take courses at Quinebaug Valley Community College in Connecticut. Five years later, after deaths in her family, she fell behind on her payments and entered a loan-rehabilitation program. "That's when my nightmare began," she says.

In rehabilitation, Martish's $8,000 loan, with fees and interest, ballooned into a $27,000 debt, which she has been carrying ever since. She says she's paid more than $63,000 to date and is nowhere near discharging the principal. "By the time I die," she says, "I will probably pay more than $200,000 toward an $8,000 loan." She pauses. "It's a scam, you see. Nothing ever comes off the loan. It's all interest and fees. And they chase you until you're old, like me. They never stop. Ever."

The Great College Loan Swindle

rollingstone.com

Jasmine Wynona

45 days ago

In that incident, UW raised tuition by 5.5 percent six years in a row after 2007. The school blamed stresses from the financial crisis and decreased state aid. But when pressed during a state committee hearing in 2013 about the university's finances, UW system president Kevin Reilly admitted they held $648 million in reserve, including $414 million in tuition payments. This was excess hidey-hole cash the school was sitting on, separate and distinct from, say, an endowment fund.

After the university was showered with criticism for hoarding cash at a time when it was gouging students with huge price increases every year, the school responded by saying, essentially, it only did what all the other kids were doing. UW released data showing that other major state-school systems across the country were similarly stashing huge amounts of cash. While Wisconsin's surplus was only 25 percent of its operating budget, for instance, Minnesota's was 29 percent, and Illinois maintained a whopping 34 percent reserve.

When Collinge, of Student Loan Justice, looked into it, he found that the phenomenon wasn't confined to state schools. Private schools, too, have been hoarding cash even as they plead poverty and jack up tuition fees. "They're all doing it," he says.

While universities sit on their stockpiles of cash and the loan industry generates record profits, the pain of living in debilitating debt for many lasts into retirement. Take Veronica Martish. She's a 68-year-old veteran, having served in the armed forces in the Vietnam era. She's also a grandmother who's never been in trouble and consid
ers herself a patriot. "The thing is, I tried to do everything right in my life," she says. "But this ruined my life."

This is an $8,000 student loan she took out in 1989, through Sallie Mae. She borrowed money so she could take courses at Quinebaug Valley Community College in Connecticut. Five years later, after deaths in her family, she fell behind on her payments and entered a loan-rehabilitation program. "That's when my nightmare began," she says.

In rehabilitation, Martish's $8,000 loan, with fees and interest, ballooned into a $27,000 debt, which she has been carrying ever since. She says she's paid more than $63,000 to date and is nowhere near discharging the principal. "By the time I die," she says, "I will probably pay more than $200,000 toward an $8,000 loan." She pauses. "It's a scam, you see. Nothing ever comes off the loan. It's all interest and fees. And they chase you until you're old, like me. They never stop. Ever."

The Great College Loan Swindle

rollingstone.com

Jasmine Wynona

46 days ago

The Disappearing Right to Earn a Living

theatlantic.com

Jasmine Wynona

49 days ago

A Wave of New Fiction From Nigeria, as Young Writers Experiment With New Genres

nytimes.com

Jasmine Wynona

50 days ago

New York City Has Genetically Distinct ‘Uptown’ and ‘Downtown’ Rats

theatlantic.com

Jasmine Wynona

61 days ago

Cities need visitors, and visitors need cities to discover other ways of life that can open their minds, but a city engineered expressly for tourists ceases to care for its own citizens. The streetscape of New York has been reconstructed for a transient population. Grocery stores, Laundromats, gas stations, shoe repair shops—the things locals need—are vanishing. In their place have come suburban-mall chain stores, along with businesses that cater to passing moments of fun, the sort of thing that people on vacation enjoy. Case in point: New York is drowning in sugar. Instead of local diners, we have a million ice cream shops. Instead of bookstores, we have candy shops. Instead of bohemians in cafés, we have people lining up for cronuts, the expensive hybrid of a croissant and a doughnut. Throughout the 2000s, a profusion of cupcake chains opened, some replacing decades-old local businesses pushed out by hiked rents. Penny Arcade asked, "How did New York go from people coming to New York because they wanted sex, they wanted glamor, they wanted experience, they wanted to expand their horizons, they wanted to reinvent themselves? How did it go from that to people who want to come to New York because they watch Sex and the City and they want a cupcake? New York's gone from being the Big Apple to being the Big Cupcake." The reconstructed city, dulled for the palates of out-of-towners, has become cute and consumable. Out with urban grit, in with sugary goo.

Tourism Is Eating New York Alive

vice.com

Jasmine Wynona

66 days ago

Hmmm...

Generation Kidless

money.good.is

Jasmine Wynona

68 days ago

Stop Politicizing the Science Around Biological Sex Differences

playboy.com

Jasmine Wynona

69 days ago

One of the reasons why I don't really tell people to "just Google it."

It’s time to stop trusting Google search already

theverge.com

Jasmine Wynona

70 days ago

Teen Girl Posed For 8 Years As Married Man To Write About Baseball And Harass Women

deadspin.com

Jasmine Wynona

71 days ago

It’s Time to Admit That Allowing Men Into the Workplace Was a Mistake

slate.com

Jasmine Wynona

71 days ago

For the love of Earth, stop traveling

washingtonpost.com

Jasmine Wynona

74 days ago

A successful sex life can’t be quantified with notches on a bedpost, or how long you last, or how many orgasms you induce. A successful sex life is one that is open to choice and alert to possibilities. The most sexually successful straight men I know don’t see women as prey — they see them as people with desires and disinterests as valid as their own. To bully women until they relent to your advances is to miss out on one of the most thrilling erotic experiences available to mankind — seduction. Because the precursor to sex is not a chase, but a tango. It’s looking for the signals of desire, then responding with your own. It’s signaling your desire, then being rejected and feeling awful — and then dusting yourself off and setting out looking, once again.

If We Can’t Talk About Sex, We Can’t Stop Sexual Abuse

thecut.com

Jasmine Wynona

74 days ago

“Everyone But Cis Men”: Creating Better Safe Spaces for LGBT People

the-toast.net

Jasmine Wynona

76 days ago

It wasn't political for me. It was laziness.

Yes, laziness. 😂 😂 😂

The Joy of Not Wearing a Bra

newyorker.com

Jasmine Wynona

76 days ago

🤔 🤔

5 Things That Are Almost as Deadly as Smoking, According to Science

sciencealert.com

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