Stephannie Adinde

Lifelong Learner

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Stephannie Adinde

22 days ago

Make Better Decisions by Challenging Your Expectations

hbr.org

Stephannie Adinde

23 days ago

Love this!

50 Ideas That Changed My Life

perell.com

Stephannie Adinde

24 days ago

How to take things less personally

psyche.co

Stephannie Adinde

25 days ago

In a world without future, each parting of friends is a death. In a world without future, each loneliness is final. In a world without future, each laugh is the last laugh. In a world without future, beyond the present lies nothingness, and people cling to the present as if hanging from a cliff.

Alan Lightman’s Poetic Exploration of Time and the Antidote to the Anxiety of Aliveness

getpocket.com

Stephannie Adinde

34 days ago

This means that being understanding is not only, and perhaps not first and foremost, an intellectual virtue. Instead, it is largely a moral virtue. It’s to do with how we approach others, with the way we listen, with how accepting, empathic and helpful we are.

For Iris Murdoch, being understanding is life’s moral project

psyche.co

Stephannie Adinde

34 days ago

Fantastic read

The Marriage Lesson That I Learned Too Late

theatlantic.com

Stephannie Adinde

35 days ago

“Every man of genius who writes history,” he maintained, “infuses into it, perhaps unconsciously, the character of his own spirit. His characters . . . seem to have only one manner of thinking and feeling, and that is the manner of the author.” When we listen to a tale, we need to take into account the teller.

The People Who Decide What Becomes History

newyorker.com

Stephannie Adinde

35 days ago

Are you bad at texting? Here are the new rules for 2022.

washingtonpost.com

Stephannie Adinde

35 days ago

This year of stillness and retreat has made it plain that time is not an empty thing we have to fill but a living thing that we must shape.

What’s The Vibe? A Reading List

longreads.com

Stephannie Adinde

44 days ago

Crypto’s Most Powerful Regulator Is Here

nymag.com

Stephannie Adinde

55 days ago

Why it costs so much to move goods around Africa

economist.com

Stephannie Adinde

76 days ago

Yes to Life, in Spite of Everything: Viktor Frankl’s Lost Lectures

getpocket.com

Stephannie Adinde

87 days ago

The Stoic Antidote to Frustration

getpocket.com

Stephannie Adinde

101 days ago

How We Should Have Been Loved

theschooloflife.com

Stephannie Adinde

101 days ago

What science still can’t explain about love

vox.com

Stephannie Adinde

110 days ago

India’s tech sector has a caste problem

restofworld.org

Stephannie Adinde

110 days ago

When Women Make Headlines

pudding.cool

Stephannie Adinde

129 days ago

There’s Nothing Effortless About Being a Woman

getpocket.com

Stephannie Adinde

147 days ago

4 Rules for Identifying Your Life’s Work

theatlantic.com

Stephannie Adinde

151 days ago

We discipline our lives by the time on the clock. Our working lives and wages are determined by it, and often our “free time” is rigidly managed by it too. Broadly speaking, even our bodily functions are regulated by the clock: We usually eat our meals at appropriate clock times as opposed to whenever we are hungry, go to sleep at appropriate clock times as opposed to whenever we are tired and attribute more significance to the arresting tones of a clock alarm than the apparent rising of the sun at the center of our solar system. The fact that there is a strange shame in eating lunch before noon is a testament to the ways in which we have internalized the logic of the clock. We are “time binding” animals, as the American economist and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin put it in his 1987 book, “Time Wars.” “All of our perceptions of self and world are mediated by the way we imagine, explain, use and implement time.”

The Tyranny Of Time

noemamag.com

Stephannie Adinde

163 days ago

The Year in Vibes

newyorker.com

Stephannie Adinde

172 days ago

How to rest well

psyche.co

Stephannie Adinde

178 days ago

Amazon, Walmart Learn to Live With Indian Stores, Not Kill Them

bloomberg.com

Stephannie Adinde

178 days ago

Notes on newsletters

ben-evans.com

Stephannie Adinde

194 days ago

The Nothingness of Money

moretothat.com

Stephannie Adinde

202 days ago

Forgiving People Is Good for Your Health. Here’s How to Do It.

getpocket.com

Stephannie Adinde

202 days ago

Praise: Why We Crave It So Much at Work and In Our Personal Lives, and How to Live Without It

getpocket.com

Stephannie Adinde

211 days ago

The Meaning of Life Is Surprisingly Simple

theatlantic.com

Stephannie Adinde

213 days ago

How Primark makes money selling $3.50 T-shirts

economist.com

Stephannie Adinde

216 days ago

The official figures that economists track—think of GDP or employment—come with lags of weeks or months and are often revised dramatically. Productivity takes years to calculate accurately. It is only a slight exaggeration to say that central banks are flying blind.

A real-time revolution will up-end the practice of macroeconomics

economist.com

Stephannie Adinde

219 days ago

A Profession Is Not a Personality

theatlantic.com

Stephannie Adinde

229 days ago

So a fair summary of Instagram according to Instagram might go like this: Here is a fun product that millions of people seem to love; that is unwholesome in large doses; that makes a sizable minority feel more anxious, more depressed, and worse about their bodies; and that many people struggle to use in moderation.

Social Media Is Attention Alcohol

theatlantic.com

Stephannie Adinde

233 days ago

Billions hidden beyond reach

washingtonpost.com

Stephannie Adinde

249 days ago

Enduring love is not some kind of cosmic switch, turned on once and for all by mysterious forces. Rather, it is a dial that we can turn up over time by the commitments we choose to make and keep to one another. Romantic love is very much like any other important pursuit: Success comes from our ongoing effort; satisfaction from a job well done.

Stop Waiting for Your Soul Mate

theatlantic.com

Stephannie Adinde

261 days ago


The difference is subtle but potent. While intelligence gives you specific utility, wisdom inspires flexible versatility. It provides a more textured lens for interacting with reality, very much changing how you think.

The difference between intelligence and wisdom—and how to acquire both

qz.com

Stephannie Adinde

261 days ago

The bitcoin value chain is fascinating really

Bitcoin Uses More Electricity Than Many Countries. How Is That Possible?

nytimes.com

Stephannie Adinde

262 days ago


All that means is that it’s hard to quantify the impact my name has had on my life. No, it hasn’t ruined it – I’m in a good job, in a great city, doing something I enjoy. But still, it’s hard not to play Sliding Doors in your head, and wonder what life might have looked like for Adam rather than Amit.

Is your name ruining your life?

wired.co.uk

Stephannie Adinde

262 days ago

The Secret to Happiness at Work

theatlantic.com

Stephannie Adinde

262 days ago

The Girlboss Is Dead. Long Live the Girlboss.

thecut.com

Stephannie Adinde

266 days ago

The globalisation of ideas will be different than that of goods

aeon.co

Stephannie Adinde

283 days ago

The perfectionism trap

amp-economist-com.cdn.ampproject.org

Stephannie Adinde

297 days ago

“Fear of the Central Bank of Nigeria is the beginning of wisdom,”

Fintech is booming, despite a weak economy. Can that last?

economist.com

Stephannie Adinde

298 days ago

The Time Tax

theatlantic.com

Stephannie Adinde

311 days ago


One way to begin understanding complex systems is by describing them in detail: mapping out their parts, their multiple interactions, and how they change through time

How Description Leads to Understanding

fs.blog

Stephannie Adinde

325 days ago


Someone asked me once where I thought my resilience came from. I hesitated, then said, “For women, too often, I think what we mistake as resilience is actually just endurance.”

Some People Flip Real Estate. I Flip Men.

nytimes.com

Stephannie Adinde

325 days ago

Do Your Friends Actually Like You?

nytimes.com

Stephannie Adinde

327 days ago

Big oil and gas kept a dirty secret for decades. Now they may pay the price

theguardian.com

Stephannie Adinde

327 days ago

The moral philosopher Peter Singer once proposed a famous thought experiment: You see a child drowning in a pond. Do you jump in after her? Even if you didn’t push her in? Even if you’re wearing an expensive suit or dress? The socially acceptable answer to the question is you ruin your suit to save the child. But ordinary people with plentiful savings justify ignoring the deaths of children every day, even when the opportunity to save them is as close as an Internet connection.

The Greatest Good

theatlantic.com

Stephannie Adinde

332 days ago

We All Have “Main-Character Energy” Now

newyorker.com

Stephannie Adinde

332 days ago

IQ tests can’t measure it, but ‘cognitive flexibility’ is key to learning and creativity

theconversation.com

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