Matt Koidin

Father and husband, CTO at Pocket, sports fan, east coast guy putting down roots in SF

6K Followers | 126 Following

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Matt Koidin

18 days ago

Fun article by a friend about the “solving problems in the shower” phenomenon that I definitely feel happens to me. Also a subtle plug for meditation (which is why I guess Headspace published it!)

Stepping away from a difficult problem or a bad case of writer’s block with a walk also distracts the brain just enough to give it a chance to rest. When you stop thinking deliberately about a problem and daydream a little, your subconscious has a chance to play. Studies have found that after a period of mind wandering, the mind makes more creative connections between bits of information you already know.

Why do we get our best ideas in the shower?

headspace.com

Matt Koidin

22 days ago

A reminder of the importance of perspective...

And so, on Valentine’s Day of 1990, just after Bulgaria’s Communist regime was finally defeated after nearly half a century of reign, the Voyager took the now-iconic image of Earth known as the “Pale Blue Dot” — a grainy pixel, “a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam,” as Sagan so poetically put it when he immortalized the photograph in his beautiful “Pale Blue Dot” monologue from Cosmos — that great masterwork of perspective, a timeless reminder that “everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was… every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician” lived out their lives on this pale blue dot. And every political conflict, every war we’ve ever fought, we have waged over a fraction of this grainy pixel barely perceptible against the cosmic backdrop of endless lonesome space.

In Praise of the Telescopic Perspective: A Reflection on Living Through Turbulent Times

brainpickings.org

Matt Koidin

30 days ago

I’ve missed video games for a long time. Just fell out of the loop awhile back and never figured out the time or way to get back.

I’m still not sure I’m going to get a Switch, but if I do this article was definitely the turning point.

The Nintendo Switch is on some Bruce Lee shit. The ‘water becomes the cup’ kinda stuff. If I’m at home and somehow have the time the Switch connects to my TV quickly and efficiently. If someone needs the main TV that’s fine, I’ll just slot the Switch into the controllers. On the bus, fine. In bed, fine. On holiday, fine. Waiting at the doctor’s because your kid has hand, foot and mouth, fine. All of it is fine.

The Nintendo Switch is designed for a busy life. It’s designed specifically to filter seamlessly into the gaps of a busy life. I can’t tell you how liberating that has been for me. How convenient it is.

The Nintendo Switch Gave Me Back My Video Games

kotaku.com

Matt Koidin

40 days ago

I haven’t seen Good Will Hunting in ages, but this article did indeed remind me of all the great moments in the movie...

Good Will Hunting feels important and impactful because of its big moments and big scenes—the ones identifiable by a single setting or line: the Harvard Bar Argument scene, the park bench scene, the “Say you don’t love me” scene, the “Do you know how easy this is for me?” scene, the “It’s not your fault” scene, the “The best part of my day” scene, etc. But what makes the movie feel truly alive and special are the smaller things, the tiny things—all of its “wonderful idiosyncrasies,” as it were.

Remembering the Wonderful Little Idiosyncrasies of ‘Good Will Hunting’ on Its 20th Anniversary

theringer.com

Matt Koidin

46 days ago

As the father of two girls about 7 years behind this author (although some days it feels like mere months), I really enjoyed this, especially the daughter’s footnotes (which to enjoy you’ll need to check out in web view).

Raising a Teenage Daughter*

story.californiasunday.com

Matt Koidin

68 days ago

I enjoyed the 30 minutes I spent with this short story. Thank you, Mr. King.

Cookie Jar

vqronline.org

Matt Koidin

83 days ago

Proud to call Matt a friend. And very, very cool to see the progress happening. “Let’s go to war” indeed.

Matt and Kristen Wilsey had known their daughter was ill even in utero, and that real challenges lay ahead. On the day Grace was born, her heart rate was low, forcing an emergency caesarean section. “The feeling was like shell shock,” Matt Wilsey said. “The feeling was, ‘my life is over.’

“But that sort of pity party lasts for about 10 minutes, and then it’s like, OK, now it’s time to go to war.”

A rare disease inspires Stanford researchers to find a new way to attack cancer

news.stanford.edu

Matt Koidin

90 days ago

Did anyone else go through a JFK Assassination phase as a kid? I remember thinking as a kid that this day felt so far away in the future and now it is upon us! 12 year old me would have been convinced with this information I’d be the one to finally solve the mystery of what happened...

The National Archives, abandoning its plans to release the documents in batches over the course of several months, said this week that it will instead release everything at once—all on the same day—sometime between now and the deadline on October 26.

The JFK Document Dump Could Be a Fiasco

politico.com

Matt Koidin

90 days ago

I caught a link to this article on Bill Simmons’ Twitter feed. I’m really glad I took the 10 minutes to read it. Powerful.

What saved him from killing himself, Adam would say later, was the sound of his son in another part of the house, waking in his crib from a nap. That sound, faint as it was as it seeped through the floorboards, brought Adam back from a place arrived at every day by 20 American veterans who commit suicide, and countless others who almost do. He allowed Saskia to take the gun, and when that happened, his shame now had a crack in it, and the crack allowed him to say out loud, finally, that he probably needed some help.

When Adam Schumann went to war, he didn’t foresee its horrors — or a movie about his life

washingtonpost.com

Matt Koidin

96 days ago

We’re still a few years out from dealing with this head on (I think? I hope?!) Certainly will be one I continue to follow. As with most things, I imagine moderation is key, but can’t be easy.

It seems like every generation of parents has a collective freak-out when it comes to kids and new technologies; television and video games each inspired widespread hand-wringing among grown-ups. But the inescapability of today’s mobile devices—coupled with the personal allure of social media—seems to separate smartphones from older screen-based media. Parents, teens and researchers agree smartphones are having a profound impact on the way adolescents today communicate with one another and spend their free time. And while some experts say it’s too soon to ring alarm bells about smartphones, others argue we understand enough about young people’s emotional and developmental vulnerabilities to recommend restricting kids’ escalating phone habit.

We Need to Talk About Kids and Smartphones

time.com

Matt Koidin

116 days ago

Steve Kerr is a wise man.

I’ve been fortunate enough to meet President Reagan, both Bushes, Clinton, and Obama. I didn’t agree with all of them, but it was easy to set politics aside because each possessed an inherent respect for the office, as well as the humility that comes with being a public servant in an incredible position of power, representing 300 million people. And that’s the problem now. In his tweet to Steph, Trump talked about honoring the White House but, really, isn’t it you who must honor the White House, Mr. President? And the way to do that is through compassion and dignity and being above the fray. Not causing the fray.

Mr. President: You Represent All of Us. Don’t Divide Us. Bring Us Together

si.com

Matt Koidin

123 days ago

Not a new idea, but the formula is an interesting way to put it.

It’s so funny when I hear people being so protective of ideas. People who want me to sign an NDA to tell me the simplest idea.

To me, ideas are worth nothing unless executed. They are just a multiplier. Execution is worth millions.

Ideas are just a multiplier of execution

sivers.org

Matt Koidin

132 days ago

If you've ever dealt with fantasy draft craziness, this was a fun read.

On Tuesday, September 5, several employees of The Ringer attempted to hold a fantasy football draft, the first time staffers had attempted to organize a football league since the site’s 2016 launch. It was a phenomenal failure, an experience universally panned as the worst draft any participant has ever been a part of. We spoke to those involved so that the world can know the true story of this fantasy football disaster.

“A Descent Into Madness”: An Oral History of the Fantasy Football Draft That Almost Tore Apart The Ringer

theringer.com

Matt Koidin

210 days ago

This sounds pretty cool - look forward to checking it out with the girls...

Netflix’s first interactive episode arrives on the service today, giving viewers a chance to shape the narrative through a series of decisions they make throughout the experience.

Netflix’s interactive shows arrive to put you in charge of the story

theverge.com

Matt Koidin

223 days ago

Well-written and researched. Having been through the app review process many times, really surprising to me that Apple doesn't handle this better. Hope this helps shine some light on the issue.

How to Make $80,000 Per Month on the Apple App Store

medium.com

Matt Koidin

249 days ago

Pretty solid overview of the "state of the art" with COBOL - fascinating to remember how much it still powers.

Think COBOL is dead? About 95 percent of ATM swipes use COBOL code, Reuters reported in April, and the 58-year-old language even powers 80 percent of in-person transactions. In fact, Reuters calculates that there’s still 220 billion lines of COBOL code currently being used in production today, and that every day, COBOL systems handle $3 trillion in commerce.

COBOL Is Everywhere. Who Will Maintain It?

thenewstack.io

Matt Koidin

313 days ago

It's probably approaching 30 years since I spent quality time with Link, but man, this review is giving me the itch!

‘The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild’ Is a Game Without Gates

theringer.com

Matt Koidin

377 days ago

JZ's writing on distraction keeps pushing me in a direction I know I should be going. Christine and I did delete Facebook from our phones tonight. I imagine dipping your toes in (or out as the case may be) of the infinity pool doesn't quite get you there - will need to keep pushing on going further!

But they can be too much of a good thing. Keeping Infinity Pools on your phone is like having a casino in your house. If you’re addicted to gambling, it’s a disaster. Even if you’re not, it’s still damn distracting! (And most of us are addicted to our phones.)

Distractions are a Nuisance, but Infinity Pools are the Real Problem

medium.com

Matt Koidin

382 days ago

I enjoy these end of the year posts that give insights into the products and services that others use. Steve's is one of the best - I always find something new to try after reviewing and this year is no different.

My favorite products of 2016

medium.com

Matt Koidin

388 days ago

Part two (of four) of the Coates/Obama interview. A lot here. Worth the time to read and parse. General takeaway: man is Obama a thoughtful dude.

And I always tell my staff, “Better is good.” I’ll take better every time, because better is hard. Better may not be as good as the best, but better is surprisingly hard to obtain. And better is actually harder than worse.

‘Better Is Good’: Obama on Reparations, Civil Rights, and the Art of the Possible

theatlantic.com

Matt Koidin

391 days ago

This is the first of a 4 part series of interviews by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Obama. They go deep on race and other topics and is a really interesting read. Just so thoughtful and penetrating...

'The Filter ... Is Powerful': Obama on Race, Media, and What It Took to Win

theatlantic.com

Matt Koidin

401 days ago

I worshipped Larry Bird growing up. This was a fun trip down memory lane...

Larry Bird ULTIMATE Mixtape!

youtube.com

Matt Koidin

411 days ago

As a parent, I'm really glad I read this today. I doubt my path will ever cross with Patton Oswalt's, but if it does, this is the thing I'll remember, and I'd like to think I'd thank him for sharing.

You will never be prepared for anything you do, ever. Not the first time. Training and practice are out the window the second they meet experience. But you'll get better. I have subjective yet ironclad knowledge of this.

Patton Oswalt’s Year of Magical Parenting

gq.com

Matt Koidin

435 days ago

Not surprising from Sorkin, but some good lines in here. More eloquent than the letter I wrote Maile and Lauren ;) I like the end as well, but won't ruin it by quoting, read for yourself!

America didn’t stop being America last night and we didn’t stop being Americans and here’s the thing about Americans: Our darkest days have always—always—been followed by our finest hours.

Read the Letter Aaron Sorkin Wrote His Daughter After Donald Trump Was Elected President

vanityfair.com

Matt Koidin

450 days ago

Well-written summary of how the Exploratorium were victims of a phishing attack. Not too technical and a good reminder to be careful out there!

We Got Phished

exploratorium.edu

Matt Koidin

475 days ago

Consider me intrigued...

Earlier this month, Hiroshi Lockheimer, Google’s head of Android, Chrome OS, and Play, tweeted that “I have a feeling 8 years from now we’ll be talking about Oct 4, 2016.”

Next week, Google will announce a bunch of new products. The gadget world will never be the same

wired.com

Matt Koidin

500 days ago

One of the parts you don't always think of when you see the headline. Powerful. Took my breath away.

After the bathroom you do nothing before you go to her. You don’t make a phone call, you do not talk to the medical student, you do not put in an order. You never make her wait. She is his mother.

How to Tell a Mother Her Child Is Dead

nytimes.com

Matt Koidin

514 days ago

I couldn't agree more. Cheddar and Sour Cream Ruffles. Are. The. Best. #getinmybelly

About that sensory experience: Technically speaking, Cheddar and Sour Cream Ruffles are flawless.

Letter of Recommendation: Cheddar and Sour Cream Ruffles

mobile.nytimes.com

Matt Koidin

514 days ago

I finally had a chance to work my way through this "article" (really a short book) over the past weekend. What an incredible piece of journalism/story. The stories of the 6 people they follow through the Middle East are just incredible. Truly heart breaking in many respects, but also puts a human face on the larger issues at play. Highly recommend to make the time to work through this - just gives you a perspective that the normal "news" channels are missing and will give you better context to think about things when you hear the latest updates from Iraq, Syria, Libya, etc.

Fractured Lands: How the Arab World Came Apart

nytimes.com

Matt Koidin

522 days ago

Given how much Trump has been railing lately about his unfair portrayal in the media, I thought this perspective was interesting. Not sure it explains/excuses everything for me - but interesting to read and consider this pov.

The fact that he said some things about a baby at a rally can be spun any possible way. Now, if you were at the rally, you probably had one kind of reaction. And if you heard about it filtered through a headline that was mischaracterized, it sounds like Trump hates babies. If you heard that out of context about anybody else, you might laugh and say, “People don’t hate babies, that’s crazy.” But because the Clinton campaign are such good persuaders at this point — and their tentacles into the media are so good, either directly or through their surrogates — the overall message that Trump is evil creates this confirmation-bias trap, where you see every little story as supporting it, no matter how ridiculous it is.

Trump, Dilbert, Wizards, Fear, and Testosterone

theringer.com

Matt Koidin

542 days ago

Great rant on trailers. Full disclosure, I definitely watch them all the time, but this article will be a nudge in my head going forward that going into movies cold is probably a better idea.

Trailers are ruining good movies, and they are making average movies unwatchable. They are bad and they need to be sent back to the factory.

Stop Watching Movie Trailers

theringer.com

Matt Koidin

547 days ago

Elon doesn't explicitly mention a timeline here, but the first plan was 10 years. If this is what is coming in the next 10 years (or even my lifetime), going to be pretty amazing! Just so great seeing someone push the envelope like this - and doing it in a way that takes us all along for the ride (literally!)

By definition, we must at some point achieve a sustainable energy economy or we will run out of fossil fuels to burn and civilization will collapse. Given that we must get off fossil fuels anyway and that virtually all scientists agree that dramatically increasing atmospheric and oceanic carbon levels is insane, the faster we achieve sustainability, the better.

Here is what we plan to do to make that day come sooner

Master Plan, Part Deux

tesla.com

Matt Koidin

553 days ago

Now, this is awesome! Although I will miss blowing on the cartridges :)

Nintendo's Classic Mini is a tiny NES with 30 games

engadget.com

Matt Koidin

572 days ago

I asked a young friend of mine, a woman in her 20s of Muslim heritage, how she had been feeling after the attack. “I just feel really bad, like people think I have more in common with that idiot psychopath than I do the innocent people being killed,” she said. “I’m really sick of having to explain that I’m not a terrorist every time the shooter is brown.”

Aziz Ansari: Why Trump Makes Me Scared for My Family

nytimes.com

Matt Koidin

578 days ago

I learned a few things reading this article. I'm not sure it's changed my position on things, but it helps to understand the language of those who disagree with you. It feels like the debate/conversation needs to be happening at this level - this isn't a simple issue and until we start discussing in a more informed way we won't get anywhere. Anyways worth the read - regardless of where you stand on the issue, my guess is you'll learn something.

Why I “Need” an AR-15

medium.com

Matt Koidin

588 days ago

This video is incredible. Just awe-inspiring that man can build like this - and equally so that he captures it so beautifully.

The Lion City II - Majulah

vimeo.com

Matt Koidin

594 days ago

Read. Every word. Let it make you angry. Let it make you uncomfortable. And then tell someone else to read it.

Here Is The Powerful Letter The Stanford Victim Read Aloud To Her Attacker

buzzfeed.com

Matt Koidin

594 days ago

Man, good to have some Bill Simmons back in the feed!

The KD Conundrum

theringer.com

Matt Koidin

601 days ago

I've lived with allergies my whole life and learned more than I ever knew before from this article. Not sure I'm quite ready to be entirely thankful for the allergy attacks, but understanding is always a good step...

Medzhitov and Cullen will be observing these allergy-free mice for the next couple of years. The animals may be spared the misery of hay fever caused by the ragweed pollen that will inevitably drift into their box on currents of air. But Medzhitov predicts they will be worse off for it. Unable to fight the pollen and other allergens, they will let these toxic molecules pass into their bodies, where they will damage organs and tissues.

A controversial theory may explain the real reason humans have allergies

qz.com

Matt Koidin

621 days ago

Happy Mother's Day! 💝

Kimmel Staffers Read Texts From Their Moms

youtube.com

Matt Koidin

628 days ago

Interesting read that really highlights some of the exciting things going on in the space Pocket plays in...

The feed is dying. The reverse-chronological social media feed — the way you’ve read Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and blogs (which is to say, the internet) at various points over the last decade, updates organized according to the time they were posted, refreshed at the top of the screen — no longer really makes sense. The unfiltered informational cascade that defined the internet of the 2010s is going the way of the front-page-style web portal: It’s an outdated way of processing online information.

The Feed Is Dying

nymag.com

Matt Koidin

635 days ago

Empathy. Who would have thought?

The End of Empathy

medium.com

Matt Koidin

642 days ago

Boston, baby!

Honestly, I still didn’t know what he meant. Playing in Boston is just one of those things you can’t prepare yourself for. You can’t understand it until you experience it.

Now I get it.

Boston

theplayerstribune.com

Matt Koidin

647 days ago

New rule - any video that the girls make me watch > 3 times in a row gets an automatic recommend!

iPhone 6s - Timer - Behind The Scenes

youtube.com

Matt Koidin

648 days ago

Stumbled on this new email newsletter that Kevin Rose is doing via a Medium recommendation and like what I'm seeing from the first couple of issues. Short, to the point, interesting, helpful - all good things. You can sign up here: http://www.thejournal.email/

Issue 1 — The Journal by Kevin Rose — Medium

medium.com

Matt Koidin

650 days ago

"Damn, that shit was dope."

Now, the question is, are we rock & roll? And I say you goddamn right we rock & roll. Rock & roll is not an instrument, rock & roll is not even a style of music. Rock & roll is a spirit. It's a spirit. It's been going since the blues, jazz, bebop, soul, R&B, rock & roll, heavy metal, punk rock and yes, hip-hop. And what connects us all is that spirit. That's what connects us all, that spirit. Rock & roll is not conforming to the people who came before you, but creating your own path in music and in life. That is rock & roll, and that is us.

Read N.W.A's Heartfelt Rock Hall Acceptance Speeches

rollingstone.com

Matt Koidin

650 days ago

This is a short read, but speaks the truth - could honestly have quoted the whole thing. If you work on software as a dev, PM, designer, whatever, this is worth the five minutes!

Every developer has been asked whether building a certain feature is “possible”. The short answer is virtually always YES. It’s possible. Software is the clay of dreams; everything is possible.

Everything is possible but nothing is free — Signal v. Noise

m.signalvnoise.com

Matt Koidin

654 days ago

We love us some Mo Willems - NYC is a bit far to travel for this show, but sounds like it'd be fun to check out.

Mo Willems and the Art of the Children’s Book

mobile.nytimes.com

Matt Koidin

656 days ago

The concept for this new restaurant in Chicago sounds pretty cool. I always enjoy restaurants with "open" kitchens and this sounds like it takes that even further.

Ready to Roister

medium.com

Matt Koidin

668 days ago

Was talking to a friend this weekend about this approach. Reminds me a bit of the Steve Jobs-style where the same thing every day.

Here's Why I Make the Same Recipes for Dinner Every Week

thekitchn.com

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