M.G. Siegler

Investor. Writer. Traveler. Also I read. A lot.

245K Followers | 73 Following

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M.G. Siegler

1 day ago

Wall Street Journal Editorial Harshly Rebukes Trump

nytimes.com

M.G. Siegler

1 day ago

Mind-Blowing New Theory Connects Black Holes, Dark Matter, and Gravitational Waves

gizmodo.com

M.G. Siegler

1 day ago

The Great Communicator

theringer.com

M.G. Siegler

2 days ago

The Squid

500ish.com

M.G. Siegler

3 days ago

Out to Fix the Twins, a New Executive Wants More From the Mound

nytimes.com

M.G. Siegler

3 days ago

Hard to pick which part to share. So will just share the entire thing :) 💰💰💰⛏⛏⛏💵💵💵

As Bank of America was really starting to come into its own, the US federal government jumped in to help. President Woodrow Wilson imposed branch banking on the United States to, as he said, “put the resources of the rich banks of the country at the disposal of the whole countryside, to whose merchants and farmers have only a restricted and local credit is now open”. This was music to Giannini’s ears. He put up banks anywhere he could and gave credit to businesses that Wall St shunned. His early clients included California wine producers, movie studios and a small businessman under financial duress named Walt Disney.

“Building destroyed. Vault intact. Credit unaffected.”

medium.com

M.G. Siegler

3 days ago

Google’s Plan to Engineer the Next Silicon Valleys

backchannel.com

M.G. Siegler

3 days ago

But a group within Amazon has explored another larger grocery store format, according to both a person familiar with the concept and to internal Amazon documents reviewed by The New York Times. The store could stock fresh produce, meats and other items in a public area of the store, while keeping frozen foods, cereals and other items traditionally found in the center of a grocery store behind a wall, in what would be a kind of small Amazon warehouse. Workers behind the wall, not robots, could quickly package orders for customers.

Amazon’s Ambitions Unboxed: Stores for Furniture, Appliances and More

nytimes.com

M.G. Siegler

3 days ago

Ancient Romans doctored their wines with pig’s blood, marble dust, lead and sulfur dioxide.

Ignore the Snobs, Drink the Cheap, Delicious Wine

nytimes.com

M.G. Siegler

5 days ago

The Teen Whisperer

newyorker.com

M.G. Siegler

5 days ago

“Hello, Bob”: When President Trump called my cellphone to say that the health-care bill was dead

medium.com

M.G. Siegler

6 days ago

Death of a Virgin

500ish.com

M.G. Siegler

10 days ago

Sorry for the Delayed Response

newyorker.com

M.G. Siegler

10 days ago

The quest to crystallize time

nature.com

M.G. Siegler

11 days ago

Meet The Man Whose Site Mark Zuckerberg Reads Every Day

buzzfeed.com

M.G. Siegler

11 days ago

The inside story of the Lakers' family drama

espn.com

M.G. Siegler

11 days ago

This is, quite literally, bananas. 🍌🍌🍌

Just as the British had earlier switched from coffee to tea (substituting one caffeinated drink in a cup for another), Americans switched from the Gros Michel banana to the Cavendish. The advertising was so good that the new banana, the Cavendish, was even more successful commercially than had been its predecessor, the Gros Michel. Bolstering the Cavendish’s sales was the shift of American populations to cities, where the connection between what consumers bought and what grew well locally had been severed. Sales of the Cavendish banana were strong, and they continue to be.

It is with very few exceptions the only kind of banana you find in stores outside the regions where bananas grow. Its success fuels the economies of whole countries. It is the biggest export of Costa Rica, Ecuador, Panama, and Belize and the second most valuable export for Colombia, Guatemala, and Honduras. If you were born after 1950, you are unlikely to have ever purchased any banana other than the Cavendish clone—other than what is now the world’s largest organism. To the extent that anyone worried about diseases affecting the Cavendish, it was because of black leaf streak (Mycosphaerella fijiensis), which was not nearly as bad as Panama disease. Panama disease, meanwhile, had become a thing of the past. The Cavendish remained resistant in part because the pathogen itself is not very diverse and so relatively unable to adapt.

Humans Made the Banana Perfect—But Soon, It’ll Be Gone

wired.com

M.G. Siegler

12 days ago

Here, there and everywhere

economist.com

M.G. Siegler

13 days ago

Why Men Drink

medium.com

M.G. Siegler

13 days ago

Something to Take Home

theringer.com

M.G. Siegler

13 days ago

Decades’ worth of studies show that whenever cities add roads, new drivers simply fill them up. This isn’t because of new development or population growth — although that’s part of the story — but because of a vicious cycle in which new roads bring new demand that no amount of further roads can satisfy.

This has been studied at rush hour, studied on individual freeway projects and studied with large data sets that encompass nearly every road in the United States. With remarkable consistency, the research finds the same thing: Whenever a road is built or an older road is widened, more people decide to drive more. Build more or widen further, and even more people decide to drive. Repeat to infinity.

Self-Driving Cars Can’t Cure Traffic, but Economics Can

nytimes.com

M.G. Siegler

13 days ago

Perhaps most consequential, the rising dependence on cameras is changing our language. Other than in face-to-face communication, we used to talk primarily in words. Now, more and more, from GIFs to emoji, selfies to image-macro memes and live video, we talk in pictures.

Snap Makes a Bet on the Cultural Supremacy of the Camera

nytimes.com

M.G. Siegler

14 days ago

Snap out of it, Facebook! Snapchat clones rile Messenger, WhatsApp users

usatoday.com

M.G. Siegler

15 days ago

Mr. Conte founded Patreon in 2013 and has since funded $100 million in art, with creators on the platform doubling their income every year. Top creators can make tens of thousands of dollars a month. In 2016, more than 35 artists reaped more than $150,000 each on the platform.

How the Internet Is Saving Culture, Not Killing It

nytimes.com

M.G. Siegler

16 days ago

Design Conflicts in Messenger Day

medium.com

M.G. Siegler

17 days ago

Rob Manfred is trying to speed up baseball in order to save it

seattletimes.com

M.G. Siegler

17 days ago

This same pattern is very likely to be repeated in every field AI touches. That generations of human wisdom, earned by hard experience, may be about to be wiped out is a fairly depressing thought. It’s not enough that robots are going to take our jobs, they’re going to make us look like fools while doing it. But Hassabis tells me that, on the contrary, he sees potential for AI to unleash a golden age of human creativity.

Take Go again. Hassabis says it’s now clear that the level of human play had reached a kind of plateau. Why? Because those learning the game falsely assumed that with more than 2,500 years of experience playing the game, every strategy had been tried and the rules of thumb accurately distilled this history. Top players, he says, weren’t likely to experiment with wild new strategies, because — even subconsciously — they wouldn’t want to risk losing games and prestige if that experimentation failed.

Robots are going to take our jobs and make us look like fools while doing it

medium.com

M.G. Siegler

18 days ago

The legendary Hollywood renaissance of the 1970s happened because America, at the time, was mired in social upheaval, in the earthquakes brought about by the new youth culture and by the corruptions and scandals of Vietnam and Watergate; the desire to see all that reflected back at us as drama was a timely, organic phenomenon. The defining motion pictures of the age, from “Midnight Cowboy” to “M*A*S*H” to “The French Connection” to “Chinatown” to “The Last Detail” to “All the President’s Men,” weren’t things you went to see because they were “good for you.” They were films that made the darkness enthralling, because they let you go into the darkness and come out the other side. They were slices of reality that were also extraordinary pieces of entertainment, and the audience was hungry for them because there was a sense, all around you, that the stakes were so high.

Is Steven Spielberg’s Trump-Timed ‘The Post’ the Start of a New Wave of Movies That Matter?

variety.com

M.G. Siegler

18 days ago

Convertible and SAFE Notes – AVC

avc.com

M.G. Siegler

18 days ago

ShatChat

500ish.com

M.G. Siegler

23 days ago

Inside The Economist’s editorial meeting

medium.economist.com

M.G. Siegler

23 days ago

So within five years ESPN will be bringing in less subscriber revenue than they've committed for sports rights. Advertising dollars will still help, but when you factor in the costs of doing business ESPN will be losing money by 2021, potentially sooner.

ESPN Cutting Nearly $100 Million In On-Air Talent

outkickthecoverage.com

M.G. Siegler

23 days ago

Bundles of Bundles

500ish.com

M.G. Siegler

25 days ago

You can only get down with Flavortown if you believe in Flavortown.

Who Is Guy Fieri?

munchies.vice.com

M.G. Siegler

25 days ago

This Man Makes Founders Cry

backchannel.com

M.G. Siegler

25 days ago

Sports is just the prism for us,” Robertson says. “It’s the door that you are stepping through to tell a human story.”

How Derek Jeter's once-mocked startup became a sports media powerhouse

mashable.com

M.G. Siegler

25 days ago

Sweden Reinstates Conscription, With an Eye on Russia

nytimes.com

M.G. Siegler

26 days ago

Q&A: Nicholas Thompson looks to push Wired into the future by returning to radical roots

cjr.org

M.G. Siegler

26 days ago

The Not-So-Surprising Survival of Foursquare

newyorker.com

M.G. Siegler

26 days ago

A robot is a capital investment, like a blast furnace or a computer. Economists typically advise against taxing such things, which allow an economy to produce more. Taxation that deters investment is thought to make people poorer without raising much money. But Mr Gates seems to suggest that investment in robots is a little like investing in a coal-fired generator: it boosts economic output but also imposes a social cost, what economists call a negative externality. Perhaps rapid automation threatens to dislodge workers from old jobs faster than new sectors can absorb them. That could lead to socially costly long-term unemployment, and potentially to support for destructive government policy. A tax on robots that reduced those costs might well be worth implementing, just as a tax on harmful blast-furnace emissions can discourage pollution and leave society better off.

Reality, however, is more complex. Investments in robots can make human workers more productive rather than expendable; taxing them could leave the employees affected worse off. Particular workers may suffer by being displaced by robots, but workers as a whole might be better off because prices fall. Slowing the deployment of robots in health care and herding humans into such jobs might look like a useful way to maintain social stability. But if it means that health-care costs grow rapidly, gobbling up the gains in workers’ incomes, then the victory is Pyrrhic.

Why taxing robots is not a good idea

economist.com

M.G. Siegler

26 days ago

A report from De Beers’s new diamond mine

economist.com

M.G. Siegler

29 days ago

Back at My Machine

500ish.com

M.G. Siegler

30 days ago

he producers decide what the order of the awards will be. We each have a full set. I have all 24 envelopes in my briefcase; Martha has all 24 in hers. We stand on opposite sides of the stage, right off-screen, for the entire evening, and we each hand the respective envelope to the presenter. It doesn’t sound very complicated, but you have to make sure you’re giving the presenter the right envelope.

medium.com

M.G. Siegler

30 days ago

Trump inspires encryption boom in leaky D.C.

politico.com

M.G. Siegler

30 days ago

Congrats all :)

Taking Pocket Further with Mozilla

getpocket.com

M.G. Siegler

32 days ago

Adding value to both the consumer’s world, and the world at large, was always Chouinard’s intention. As he wrote in Let My People Go Surfing: “I’d much rather design and sell products so good and unique that they have no competition.” In that sense, and as a still relatively little known brand in Europe, Patagonia has work to do. But it will be able to draw on one thing its competitors can’t – a sense of purpose money can’t buy.

Why Patagonia's off-the-wall advertising asks customers to think twice before buying its products

thedrum.com

M.G. Siegler

32 days ago

As anyone who has seen “Sunset Boulevard” knows, no anxiety is as pervasive in Hollywood as the fear of obsolescence.

Shakeup at the Oscars

newyorker.com

M.G. Siegler

32 days ago

With the makeup of the Academy in a state of transition and the political character of America itself so deeply divided, the Oscars seem torn. In these troubling times, will they seek solace in the past with the self-congratulatory “La La Land”, or will they choose to amplify the voices of the sidelined with a view to a more inclusive future?  The Best Picture Oscar is always the most hotly anticipated award of the night; this year there is more riding on it than a gold statuette.

The Academy’s Best Picture dilemma

economist.com

M.G. Siegler

32 days ago

Inside Facebook’s AI Machine

backchannel.com

M.G. Siegler

32 days ago

It is easier than ever to fund an indie film, but harder than ever to get people to see it

economist.com

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