Martin Soler

Marketing, Design and Tech enthusiast. At work I help travel tech companies create better marketing strategies. Martinsoler.com

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Martin Soler

70 days ago

So many people speculate on so many options of what will happen after Covid-19. The reality is that all change will exist because of government regulations, not because of changed habits. If there is a seat at the stadium, people will sit in it. What leaders need to understand now is not some magical prediction speculation, but rather how to interpret upcoming regulations while keeping a company profitable. For example, if flights will have an empty middle row, how does one keep a flight profitable while still keeping prices affordable enough to not kill demand.

Getting the Restart Right: How to Lead When Nobody Has a Map

www-wsj-com.cdn.ampproject.org

Martin Soler

122 days ago

Would love to have a déposer look into the mind of Prince. The inspirations he got. The reasons for some of his choices and how they dovetail. While they’re genius I love understanding the reasoning behind it.

Pure Magic: The Oral History of Prince’s Super Bowl XLI Halftime Show

theringer.com

Martin Soler

148 days ago

An entertaining story of an odd royal family in India. Oddly what struck me the most in this story is the claim from the writer about truth and how journalists can feel they are truth seekers. Maybe some are, surely they must tell themselves that to keep going every day. But in reality they’re quite often the ones who craft the biased stories which in turn become fake stories.

The Jungle Prince of Delhi

nytimes.com

Martin Soler

148 days ago

The hotel industry has been busy launching new brands in a great hurry. How many will last and how many should have been focused on driving more equity to the main brand? It’s hard to judge that. For the moment it works well. The same with the consumer packaged goods industry. So many new brands. When will it be too much. That the brands return to bring a product quality guarantee and not just another product.

It has never been easier to launch a new brand

economist.com

Martin Soler

207 days ago

Having grown up poor I can somewhat relate to this. Except that in my family very few have an education. And those who do considered it a large waste of time. The upside is all of them believed in entrepreneurship at any scale. My dad was an artist, my mom had wisdom to encourage me on whatever I wanted and even when we had no money, nothing was impossible. The only thing she made sure I really understood was that nothing is owed to me. I need to work for and earn everything. There’s a huge difference when family is used to taking entrepreneurial risks. Poor or rich, some encourage that the world is full of opportunities the others worry that the world is so hard to live in they must be content with what they have.

Privilege and inequality in Silicon Valley

rickyyean.com

Martin Soler

235 days ago

It seems as if people will either choose Netflix or Disney or AppleTV. At current rates, It’s not too hard to take several services and have more variety. All it takes is two good movies to watch a month to be worth it.
As to how this is just becoming another version of cable TV - it is. Cheaper and without the ridiculous barrage of advertising that current US TV has become... between car ads and pharmaceutical happy-ever-after ones, all TV series seem to be just mortar rather than bricks.

Netflix misses its subscriber growth target—again. Welcome to the chaos era of streaming

fastcompany.com

Martin Soler

255 days ago

How DTC brands grow is something that hotels have seen over time with amenities. Before guests wanted big brand amenities. But as time went small boutique brand amenities became much more appealing. Maybe that’s the same with boutique hotels, getting bought by chains and kept as sub / semi indie brands.

linkedin.com

Martin Soler

260 days ago

An interesting precision on the use of the hype curve. It isn’t a predictive as much as it is an observation.

The Gartner Hype Cycle is … hype. Don’t use it as an excuse.

davidgerard.co.uk

Martin Soler

260 days ago

Intertingly this article didn’t mention “Undo” which is easily one of the most powerful pieces of code ever written. Something that we wished existed in real life, something that makes the computers so awesome. We can make mistakes again. Other than the few who worked with pencils and erasers.

The Lines of Code That Changed Everything

slate.com

Martin Soler

262 days ago

It is surprising how relevant this article is today. The system has not changed one bit. Before even the early adopters jump on the band wagon, there’s a phase of just plain hype that needs to be weeded out.

The Sociology of Technology Adaptation

rexxinfo.org

Martin Soler

274 days ago

The fascinating part of Keith Haring is how he mixed the commercial side of graphic arts and logo styles into art. Branding and art. Something that is probably common in today’s Instagram era.

Yes, but why? Keith Haring

wepresent.wetransfer.com

Martin Soler

290 days ago

A fun read but quite pointless. While it is very contemporary to indulge in voyeurism it lacks any depth in what actually is happening. Making Putin seem like a bumbling fool who has no idea of what is going on nor will to drive it.

The result is an example of what many call "new journalism" using the techniques of fiction to relay facts. While this article may read like a piece of imaginative writing, every detail has been carefully reported.

Behind the Scenes in Putin's Court: The Private Habits of a Latter-Day Dictator

newsweek.com

Martin Soler

291 days ago

Interesting read on what motivates Ma. Alibaba has given access to manufacturers to anyone. Starting a new company and finding suppliers has never been easier. It wasn’t rocket science or building electric cars. It was a very different idea than Amazon’s. And it makes even the smallest manufacturer available to the whole world.

What I Wish Silicon Valley Understood About Alibaba

linkedin.com

Martin Soler

312 days ago

Fascinating story of stolen cars. Despite all the modern ways, there really is a wrong and a right. There are good and bad guys. Sometimes it is more easy to see than others.

Inside the Twisted, Worldwide Hunt for a $7 Million Stolen Car

esquire.com

Martin Soler

331 days ago

From the title it would seem that nonsense could be a strategy. They’re nonsense in hindsight and seen through a really particular lens. Most of these were organic success and organic success is frequently illogical, but I would warn against trying to find your way out by searching for the illogical way as a system. We’re artists but only to a certain point.

The Best Ideas Are the Ones That Make the Least Sense

entrepreneur.com

Martin Soler

331 days ago

How many brands have managed to reinvent themselves in the last 5-10 years. It’s surprising how fast fashion goes out of fashion.

Can J. Crew Find Itself—and Its Customers—Again?

vanityfair.com

Martin Soler

331 days ago

Why wouldn’t the taxes from companies mining in an area be able to upgrade the roads and infrastructure of the area they are mining? Wouldn’t that be normal? Oh, an I must say we humans have an unrivaled ability to complain.

The Permian Basin Is Booming With Oil. But at What Cost to West Texans?

texasmonthly.com

Martin Soler

333 days ago

It is a complex task of trying to save a way of life. America has always been good at letting evolution kill the old and make way for the new (when it comes to businesses) Europe still holds on to tradition. France and it’s farmers markets still operate as they did 100 years ago. They’re great on a human level of building trust for quality. They are absolutely horrible when it comes to customer shopping experience. Could the hybrid model work. Or will the solution come from China with Alibaba’s New Retail.

The Man Who’s Going to Save Your Neighborhood Grocery Store

longreads.com

Martin Soler

376 days ago

A great story of building a superior product and doing good marketing for it. I bought into the status part of a peak/stroller/buggy with our kids. Essentially the herd mentality of, if it is that expensive and everyone has one it must be the best. It was MacLaren then. It seems the main guys in town in Paris now are Yoyo because they’re also the only ones one can take as hand-luggage on a plane. But how many times is one really traveling on a plane with a toddler?

Perfect prams for perfect parents: the rise of the bougie buggy

theguardian.com

Martin Soler

395 days ago

We inherently dislike what doesn’t make sense. We’ll try to move away from it every time. And yet most progress occurs through illogical actions. It is quite incredible. Data will help build logical answers but only gut will bring the crazy ideas that stand out. It is hard to think that way. I struggle with it in creative times. Most difficult is how to justify such ideas to managers and boards.

The Best Ideas Are the Ones That Make the Least Sense

entrepreneur.com

Martin Soler

396 days ago

I am curious if people have become dramatically more efficient than before thanks to all this technology. In theory the cost per action done is so much lower than 30 years ago. But then so is the number of distractions. Plus humans have a tendency to stretch out the time it take to do something with the time they have to do it (Parkinson’s Law?). So in the end have we gained or lost?

A Spreadsheet Way of Knowledge

wired.com

Martin Soler

402 days ago

There’s little one can say about that level of professionalism to one’s passion. Maybe it wasn’t exciting. But coming back to work after an accident like that. And coming back to win? It is just brilliant. In addition to building and selling two airlines which is a great feat of its own. Lots of respect for this man. Who had enough self-respect to get what he wanted done.

Outline - Read & annotate without distractions

outline.com

Martin Soler

402 days ago

There is always a risk when one is dependent on others for one’s business. But then is any business not depending on others for their business. Probably Google is one of the few that require very little “supply” and can meet the demand.

Amazon Is Poised to Unleash a Long-Feared Purge of Small Suppliers

bloomberg.com

Martin Soler

422 days ago

A great read for anyone wanting a peak behind the scenes of a company that takes risks and every so often has huge wins. Prime is a model many industries looking to build loyalty should replicate. Not that this day how.

The making of Amazon Prime, the internet’s most successful and devastating membership program

vox.com

Martin Soler

444 days ago

Everything that is wrong with journalism and the media is summarized in the name Murdoch. What media empires like this will inevitably come down to is using their power to create and fuel conflict. Not because of an inherent evil (though that part is arguable) but because the conflict is what sells more papers. Two sides fighting with increasingly outrageous claims will, like social media, get clicks and sell advertising. It is odd that we fight fake news so hard on social media, when media empires like this account for at least half of the problem.

6 Takeaways From The Times’s Investigation Into Rupert Murdoch and His Family

nytimes.com

Martin Soler

444 days ago

With such a concrete analysis of job changes including an estimated time stamp. Where could that talent be used? Quality workers that build such complex mechanical systems such as internal combustion engines must be of value in other industries.

The Twilight of Combustion Comes for Germany's Empire of Engines

bloomberg.com

Martin Soler

450 days ago

While I applaud more companies for trying to reinvent the retail model. I’m wondering if they’re really going at it in the right way. This is more like a Show or an Expo with permanent installation. It’s not bad, but does it really hit the right buying mindset? Or is it just like the old product show boxes in a hotel lobby? It is great to see people trying things out though.

As the Classic Department Store Falters, These 4 Challengers Want to Upend the Retail Model

adweek.com

Martin Soler

451 days ago

I don’t really know why I keep getting surprised but the fatalism of the media. An article that focuses on optimism and growing up and the writer manages to convert it into death and destruction. Reality is that as a species we do tend to find ways to survive more than we find ways to die. But that’s just irrelevant optimism and that doesn’t sell.

The Complicated Legacy of Stewart Brand’s “Whole Earth Catalog”

newyorker.com

Martin Soler

451 days ago

Slowly we’re seeing Instagram disrupt in places nobody suspected. What started as a photo sharing platform is growing beyond what most people thought. Fashion was a more obvious one. But reviews wasn’t. Graphic arts distribution was a little closer to home. Still it is interesting how a simple photo sharing platform can morph into so many other things.

Squaring up: how Insta-fashion is changing the way we shop

theguardian.com

Martin Soler

471 days ago

The concept is great. An awesome was to disconnect from the frantic pace of entrepreneurship and change culture. The idea of living in totally different cultures and actually spending time in those cultures is probably the best way to understand that the solution to everything isn’t within one’s bubble. I was surprised that “no hotels” is a criteria. I’m just not sure that an appartement is really going to change anything when one is spending 7-digit figures for the trip.

The Latest Travel Trend? Super Sabbaticals

cntraveler.com

Martin Soler

472 days ago

Brilliant story of art being re-found. Add to this a romantic art thief placing it there and we’d have a great plot for a film.

The Treasure Behind the Wall

nytimes.com

Martin Soler

478 days ago

Seems incredible that the fracking industry is being made responsible to fetch new water. Investing in desalination plants, pipelining the water in from the ocean and so forth. If they’re going to get the license to drill one would think it would come with some sort of responsibility to ensure they are helping improve the communities they work in.

A Texan tragedy: ample oil, no water

theguardian.com

Martin Soler

487 days ago

Having used slack for a while I loved it at first. To manage a small team remotely it made sense. We could update and assign tasks on topics and didn’t need to send emails. Also they could be posted, and answered in a few hours while we worked. But after a while I realized that all the important stuff ended up on email anyhow. As we went on Slack became an additional source of noise. As the teams grew it also became an additional source of anxiety - do I need to catch up with that channel as well?
I’ve since returned to doing 1 thing at a time. Mentally blocking out everything else as noise. Breaking it down into sections that fit units which, I Hope, won’t take longer than 4-5 hours (mostly much less). And during that time nothing else matters. I tend to find I get more done that way.

Is all this 'efficiency' making creatives inefficient?

campaignlive.co.uk

Martin Soler

487 days ago

I don’t think there is a death of brand loyalty. On the contrary, I think there is a death of product loyalty. Rather than always taking the same thing we want the new version of it, or a different version, or a beta version or something more. But a brand still wins. The mental comfort one has when buying something which one knows beats the risk of disappointment every time. Hotel chains inventing new brands and new hotels are doing exactly that. The brilliance of having multiple versions of Marriott or Accor is that if one has some basic trust or affinity to one product there are so many flavors to try. I used to think it was stupid and confusing but it is an old CPG habit that is making its way into hospitality.

The labor force has gradually gotten more comfortable with a new standard. It would be tough to find a millennial today with the remotest interest in working for any company for 30 years. In the spirit of “you’re not the boss of me,” more people are self-employed than ever before. Today, 15.5 million people are currently self-employed as independent contractors, according to the latest report from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. The trend is projected to accelerate rapidly, with 60 million people (or 40% of the total workforce) working for themselves by 2020.

The Death Of Brand Loyalty: Cultural Shifts Mean It's Gone Forever

forbes.com

Martin Soler

492 days ago

I am surprised that stealing art still happens. It is such a high risk for such a low return. Am also surprised that crawling on buildings and entering through windows could be a thing. Thankfully it seems this is quite limited as I haven’t seen many people climbing walls lately.

The French Burglar Who Pulled Off His Generation’s Biggest Art Heist

newyorker.com

Martin Soler

492 days ago

An inside look behind the scenes of the most extravagant movie producer in known history.

Man of Extremes

newyorker.com

Martin Soler

495 days ago

A look into a company that is incredibly good. Which has helped countless entrepreneurs build sustainable companies of their own. But which is also concentrating so much power that it becomes a little concerning.

Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox

yalelawjournal.org

Martin Soler

524 days ago

There will always be a conflict of interest as long as media is sponsored the way it is. The alternative would be to get sponsors from industries that are totally disrelated and officially state that no reporting will be done on those industries. But I doubt sponsors would be interested in paying for journalism to other verticals.

The Media’s Sacred Cows

freedommag.org

Martin Soler

525 days ago

For the average person who hasn’t lived through building a startup and creating something new, in domains one isn’t an expert in, overcoming what seems to be insurmountable odds and shipping a product nevertheless, for those people: Yes, this is a crazy madman. For the ones who are used to working in perfectly oiled machines that hardly have any kinks. Who clock in at 9, leave at 5, going through such craziness would send them into an asylum. But those people aren’t made for startup life. One either is willing to go live with that or one isn’t. Those who aren’t shouldn’t work in such environments.

Dr. Elon & Mr. Musk: Life Inside Tesla's Production Hell

wired.com

Martin Soler

590 days ago

Interesting how there’s a trend to engage with the borderline. The media knows this. The politicians love it and comedians play with it. But while seeing it through the eyes of a social network is interesting. As PT Barnum said. “We’re fascinated by the macabre.”

A Blueprint for Content Governance and Enforcement

facebook.com

Martin Soler

590 days ago

In marketing the most efficient marketers manage to bring a product and associate it to an existing mental model so potential customers can identify with it and become interested. But maybe there’s another way. It is a longer game. It requires bigger budgets. But it might just be the way to go when one wants to change the world.

Don’t Sell a Product, Sell a Whole New Way of Thinking

hbr.org

Martin Soler

607 days ago

The difficulty of building a really strong brand in travel is a given. People don’t travel because they enjoy the journey, they travel to reach the destination and the journey is a necessary evil. Luxury travel is a way to overcome the problem, but for those who only travel luxury the pain becomes equally difficult. Business travel is essentially a means to sleep on a grueling flight. It isn’t about the champagne or big screen TVs. However maybe Concorde’s branding is where it lays.

Concorde inadvertently “pioneered what was to become the art of branding,” he writes. Each item feels sleek, aspirational.

The Concorde and the Lost Glories of Commercial Air Travel

newyorker.com

Martin Soler

627 days ago

A short term side-effect of not enough salt is head-aches and other very real issues. They normally get treated with ibuprofen or other pain killers. Hopefully those who financed the study didn’t know that as that would lead to large conspiracy theories. However like the sugar/fat/calories study of the 1950s there really is a problem with single studies like this getting marketed and over-simplified and messing up generations of nutrition.

Salt is crucial to maintain an adequate blood volume and blood pressure ensuring that our tissues are perfused with the oxygen carrying blood and nutrients

The Salt Scam

medium.com

Martin Soler

639 days ago

Digital IDs will grow because the immediate benefits will outweigh tomorrow’s (possible) risk. In our minds the immediate satisfaction/joy/pleasure is always more important than the consequences. The risk I believe isn’t in digital IDs but in automation and AI decisions based on data that can be hacked. How do we install safety switches to avoid injustice. Because we know the system will get hacked. We know less scrupulous people will cheat. We must have a “fuse” that ensures people aren’t wrongly being locked up or kicked off important systems like financial etc. Digital IDs will happen.

Digital IDs Are More Dangerous Than You Think

wired.com

Martin Soler

639 days ago

Some experience is never a bad thing.

The death of once high-flying VC funds

techcrunch.com

Martin Soler

639 days ago

While the hack seems plausible it also seems too good to be true for those pushing the conspiracy theory. And as we know things that are too good to be true, usually are.

The Big Hack: How China Used a Tiny Chip to Infiltrate U.S. Companies

bloomberg.com

Martin Soler

651 days ago

A very candid and informative interview with the CEO of Spotify. Quite refreshing to see someone with vision not just at the product level but culturally and philosophically. More interesting and thought provoking than the purely science stuff that some other founders are sharing.

Exclusive: Spotify CEO Daniel Ek on Apple, Facebook, Netflix–and the future

fastcompany.com

Martin Soler

652 days ago

For all the respect I have for Mr. Iger (and I have a lot) this interview is an exercise in avoidance. There are rumors he is going for a political career and it kind of shows. As most good storytellers know, for a hero to gain empathy they must be a little vulnerable. Having opinions and stating them makes one vulnerable.

Bob Iger Talks Disney's Streaming Service, 'Roseanne,' James Gunn and a Coming 'Star Wars' "Slowdown"

hollywoodreporter.com

Martin Soler

653 days ago

A fun peek behind the glass of the old Apple campus. Great last of little stories edited from one to the other into a whole. Must admit that after a while I stopped trying to remember who is who.

An Oral History of Apple's Infinite Loop

wired.com

Martin Soler

653 days ago

The incredible growth of two companies that are unlike much of what we know in the west. Their growth comes from pioneering new tech in virgin territory. But the minute they begin to protect their walled gardens they are also slowing down progress for the future. The reason disruptive payments caught on was that there was no big credit card adoption. But there is still a lot of progress to come.

Alibaba v. Tencent: The Battle for Supremacy in China

amp-timeinc-net.cdn.ampproject.org

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