Tushar Kirtane

PM @Pocket. Politics, tech and whatnot. Searching for the perfect ?.

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Tushar Kirtane

11 days ago

Kids, Would You Please Start Fighting?

nytimes.com

Tushar Kirtane

47 days ago

Can Our Democracy Survive Tribalism?

nymag.com

Tushar Kirtane

124 days ago

An Oral History of The Simpsons’ Classic Planet of the Apes Musical

vulture.com

Tushar Kirtane

124 days ago

Ten Rules For Catching A Bottom

theirrelevantinvestor.com

Tushar Kirtane

141 days ago

A blockchain explanation your parents could understand

linkedin.com

Tushar Kirtane

148 days ago

How the Democrats Lost Their Way on Immigration

theatlantic.com

Tushar Kirtane

203 days ago

Inside the elite meme wars of America's most exclusive colleges

mic.com

Tushar Kirtane

255 days ago

For me, that first day was fairly anticlimactic. They just closed the door and said, “Bye, see you in a year.”

I Spent a Year in Isolation Pretending to Live on Mars

melmagazine.com

Tushar Kirtane

293 days ago

This is The Onion article about the Gillette exec shouting we're skipping 4 blades and going to 5 manifesting itself in real life.

"That was the really tricky part," Gomez says. "Just like anything in manufacturing, it's all about speed and efficiency. So our seasoner had to season shells fast and it had to season them right every single time. We had teams of engineers working day and night to get the seasoner working."

Deep Inside Taco Bell’s Doritos Locos Taco

fastcompany.com

Tushar Kirtane

295 days ago

For someone who reads Deadspin and appreciated Gawker, this is insightful. Reminds me of Sam Biddle's apology piece to Justine Sacco...and even with all that, I can understand why people are not sad to see the end outcome.

I first called Daulerio last July to see if he would participate in a profile. It was during our initial meeting, which was off the record, that he revealed he was trying to kick a drug and booze addiction and was confronting a recovered memory.

A.J. Daulerio Is Ready to Tell His (Whole) Gawker Story

esquire.com

Tushar Kirtane

295 days ago

It’s likely that there is someone alive today who will have their entire life quantified by technology. From birth — or maybe even before it — they were being tracked and their data was being logged via apps, or maybe with the help of electronics and some devoted parents’ use of spreadsheets.

Mommy, Daddy, and Their Precious Little Bundle of Data

theringer.com

Tushar Kirtane

318 days ago

If artificial intelligence takes over our lives, it probably won’t involve humans battling an army of robots that relentlessly apply Spock-like logic as they physically enslave us. Instead, the machine-learning algorithms that already let AI programs recommend a movie you’d like or recognize your friend’s face in a photo will likely be the same ones that one day deny you a loan, lead the police to your neighborhood or tell your doctor you need to go on a diet. And since humans create these algorithms, they're just as prone to biases that could lead to bad decisions—and worse outcomes.

How a Machine Learns Prejudice

scientificamerican.com

Tushar Kirtane

325 days ago

Alzheimer’s introduced to Colombian town by Spanish conquistador

newscientist.com

Tushar Kirtane

328 days ago

View the original to read all parts of this incredible Origin Story...

‘Stop Crying And Fight Your Father’: ‘Seinfeld’ Writers Tell How Festivus Came To Be

uproxx.com

Tushar Kirtane

328 days ago

I don't even know how I wound up on this article from 2013, but suffice it to say, pizza is a big deal in the US.

When Pizza Hut introduced a pie with mozzarella cheese filling inside the crust in 1995, it touted the product as an industry “revolution.” It was a bold assertion with which cheese maker Anthony Mongiello and his family immediately took issue. The Brooklyn native claimed to have created the stuffed crust a decade earlier when he was 18 years old and, with his relatives, held a 1987 patent to prove it.

Did Pizza Hut Really Invent the Stuffed Crust Pizza?

bloomberg.com

Tushar Kirtane

339 days ago

We Tracked Down A Fake-News Creator In The Suburbs. Here's What We Learned

npr.org

Tushar Kirtane

348 days ago

"Screenwriter Eric Heisserer shares notes and extracts from early drafts as he breaks down how he adapted Ted Chiang's "Story of Your Life.""

How I Wrote Arrival (and What I Learned Doing It)

talkhouse.com

Tushar Kirtane

348 days ago

It's a site dedicated to trading secrets on ILLUSIONS!

It has pitted professionals desperate to protect their secrets against thieving renegades, naming-and-shaming them and even reporting them to the FBI.

The world's magicians fought a hidden war over an ultra-secret website dedicated to stealing magic tricks

businessinsider.com

Tushar Kirtane

348 days ago

"When Kahneman tested this scenario with a sample of people back in the 1980s, nearly nine out of 10 assumed that having lost the tickets, the woman would forgo seeing the play. But what if the scenario was slightly different?

This time, the woman hasn’t booked in advance. Instead she has brought $160 in cash with her, ready to buy tickets at the box office. But when she gets to the theater, she opens her purse and sees that the money is somehow missing. Does she use her credit card instead?"

a woman who has spent $160 on two theatre tickets. She is looking forward to the show, but when she arrives at the theatre she can’t find the tickets. She empties out her bag. She goes through her pockets. No sign of them. She feels slightly sick as she thinks of the large sum of money she’s wasted. But what about the show? Will she spend another $160 on replacement tickets, or will she just give up and go home?

This classic thought experiment explains the weird decisions we make about spending money

qz.com

Tushar Kirtane

350 days ago

To quote Jurassic Park, "Life finds a way."

I called again. A British voice answered, “And yet the animals never gave up hope. More, they never lost, even for an instant, their sense of honor and privilege in being members of Animal Farm.”

Really? Animal Farm? Isn’t reading from George Orwell’s allegory of Stalinism a little too on the nose for Cuba? To confirm this surreal game of telephone I’d found myself in, I googled the quote to find it indeed, in chapter 10 of Animal Farm, posted online in full on marxist.org.

So that was my first experience with telecommunications fraud when calling Cuba.

I Dialed a Wrong Number and Stumbled Into International Phone Fraud

theatlantic.com

Tushar Kirtane

355 days ago

When it comes to luxury and exotic materials, the competition between fake and real is partly a technical, chemical affair: how to create a good imitation, and how to spot it. But, as artificial gold and diamonds show, there is a deeper level to it, which is about something very human and socially constructed: the concept and value of authenticity.

Authenticity in the Age of the Fake

nautil.us

Tushar Kirtane

356 days ago

Jackpot!

The evidence was mounting that Kane had found something unthinkable: the kind of thing gamblers dream of, casinos dread, and Nevada regulators have an entire auditing regime to prevent. He'd found a bug in the most popular video slot in Las Vegas.

Finding a Video Poker Bug Made These Guys Rich—Then Vegas Made Them Pay

wired.com

Tushar Kirtane

362 days ago

Incentives can be unfortunate sometimes...in particular, the stock market & public companies feel so much pressure for quarterly earnings that I do wonder what the long-term impact / view can be.

“Hedge-fund activism has recently spiked, almost hyperbolically,” Coffee writes in a 2016 paper, “The Wolf at The Door: The Impact of Hedge Fund Activism on Corporate Governance.”

These campaigns are damaging to the long-term outlook of individual companies like DuPont and also to America’s economy more generally. They often result in big cuts to research and development, substantial reductions in the workforce, and a focus on outcomes—in particular short-term profit—that hurt a company’s ability to survive in the long-term. The threat of activism affects companies across the economy: Even public companies not targeted by activists often change their behavior and cut costs to avoid becoming a target. This may be one of the reasons why America is slipping in funding research and development projects when compared with other countries.

Can America’s Companies Survive America’s Most Aggressive Investors?

theatlantic.com

Tushar Kirtane

369 days ago

Tons of insights in this article - pretty good read given the recent US election.

What So Many People Don’t Get About the U.S. Working Class

hbr.org

Tushar Kirtane

370 days ago

An American in a Strange Land

nytimes.com

Tushar Kirtane

370 days ago

How LinkedIn Drove a Wedge Between Microsoft and Salesforce

nytimes.com

Tushar Kirtane

425 days ago

Their response: Parents don’t matter as much as many parents think they do. For me—a father of a toddler—this discovery was at once deflating and reassuring. The book’s thesis can invite a kind of parental nihilism: I could read Goodnight Moon to him every night, or I could not. Does any of it really matter? But it also invites parents to be more relaxed.

Parenting is more art than science, the LeVines suggest. And the variety of that artistry reveals the many paths you can take to, as Mead would put it, help a human infant become a finished adult. The point of their global survey isn’t to pass judgment on, say, Japanese parents sharing a bed with their kids or Mexican parents leaving young children home alone. Instead, the LeVines want to encourage parents to be more skeptical and open-minded when experts tell them they absolutely positively scientifically shouldn’t “co-sleep” with their infants or leave their teenager to babysit her younger siblings, lest these practices have negative and irreversible consequences.

How Much Do Parents Matter?

theatlantic.com

Tushar Kirtane

432 days ago

The Painstaking, Secretive Process Of Designing New Money

fastcodesign.com

Tushar Kirtane

432 days ago

Nearly every American above a certain age remembers precisely where they were on September 11, 2001. But for a tiny handful of people, those memories touch American presidential history. Shortly after the attacks began, the most powerful man in the world, who had been informed of the World Trade Center explosions in a Florida classroom, was escorted to a runway and sent to the safest place his handlers could think of: the open sky.

‘We’re the Only Plane in the Sky’

politico.com

Tushar Kirtane

443 days ago

I mean, they are teaching us to cook conceptually - but I would think that it's not changing anyone's inclination to cook vs. not cook. But as a publisher, you gotta get those shares for ad $$!

Almost 20 years later, the next generation of questionable video-based food content—the now-ubiquitous quick-cut recipe clips adopted by most food publications, but popularized by BuzzFeed’s food vertical, Tasty—has received similar criticisms. Three hundred thousand homes may have been a wide reach two decades ago; today, Tasty has more than 67 million followers on Facebook. If the Food Network brought cooking into America’s homes, viral food videos have made it a part of our constant digital consumption. But are they really teaching us how to cook?

Are Viral Recipes Ruining Cooking?

firstwefeast.com

Tushar Kirtane

448 days ago

This Is Why There Are So Many Ties In Swimming

regressing.deadspin.com

Tushar Kirtane

448 days ago

The Burden of Being Asian American on Campus

theatlantic.com

Tushar Kirtane

448 days ago

What Great Listeners Actually Do

hbr.org

Tushar Kirtane

448 days ago

Ripped: My Life as a Competitive Bodybuilder

esquire.com

Tushar Kirtane

476 days ago

This is amazing - people are really creative once you start figuring out there's inefficiencies in pricing / marketing to exploit...

As it turns out, retail experts didn’t see this coming. In 1997, in the dawn of e-commerce, a New York University professor named Yannis Bakos wrote a well-regarded paper that predicted the internet would change pricing forever. Imagine the old days: You went to a store and had no idea what other stores charged for the same products -- which meant the store you were in could jack up the price. But once everyone could comparison shop online, Bakos reasoned, every site would likely have to offer the same price. And yet, it turns out, many shoppers don’t do the research. If they like eBay, they buy on eBay. Simple as that. Bell’s conclusion: “I think if you’re a small guy, you just have to accept the fact that the platform is the place where the product is going to be sold.” But which platform, and at which price? That’s hard to control.

Why It's Nearly Impossible To Stop This Amazon and eBay Scheme

entrepreneur.com

Tushar Kirtane

480 days ago

I love this article -- good to remind yourself of what's going on and how to think about it.

We learn more when we ask basic questions. Those are the questions that matter. They’re short, simple, and meant to extract information. But whether it’ s because they’re perceived as stupid or discourteous, basic questions can be difficult to ask.

The Questions That Matter

medium.com

Tushar Kirtane

489 days ago

Sleep has been transformed from a deeply personal experience to a physiological process; from the mythical to the medical; and from the romantic to the marketable. Our misconstrued sense of sleep and consequent obsession with managing it are the most critical overlooked factors in the contemporary epidemic of sleep loss.

Something is very wrong. Despite decades of innovative sleep research, escalating numbers of new sleep specialists and clinics, and an explosion of media attention and public health education initiatives, the epidemic of insufficient sleep and insomnia appears to be getting worse.

Falling for sleep

aeon.co

Tushar Kirtane

490 days ago

If cats are to be blamed for divorces, aren't they really goats (scapegoats :) )?

Today, it wouldn’t be unheard of for someone to call animal rescue services if creatures were being mistreated in any way. In the case of these early cat-related divorces, though, the cat’s well-being got caught in the crossfire of marital woes, raising new ethical questions about feline welfare. “If a wife’s tabby cat attracts the neighbor’s cats and the neighbor’s cats keep a husband awake, is the husband justified in killing the wife’s tabby cat?” asks the Los Angeles Herald in 1920.

Why Did American Cats Get Blamed for So Many Divorces?

atlasobscura.com

Tushar Kirtane

491 days ago

For a while we thought we could choose our own music. Remember that? In the wake of the last century we seized the right to take our pick from all of the songs in the world (All of the songs in the world!) and told anyone who didn’t like it exactly where they could go. And when it turned out that was too many songs after all (how many lifetimes are needed for a complete survey of Memphis soul? Or Brazilian funk?), a new category of music services appeared to ease our burden. But these services were flawed, said someone about to make a lot of money, and could only recommend music based on what we were already listening to. Did they even really know what we wanted? Do we not contain multitudes? And so now we have people like Chery.

The Playlist Professionals At Apple, Spotify, And Google

buzzfeed.com

Tushar Kirtane

494 days ago

Young people very well may lead the country in entrepreneurship, as a mentality. But when it comes to the more falsifiable measure of entrepreneurship as an activity, older generations are doing most of the work. The average age for a successful startup-founder is about 40 years old, according to the Kauffman Foundation, a think tank focused on education and entrepreneurship. (In their words, one’s 40s are the “peak age for business formation.”) The reality is that the typical American entrepreneur isn’t that hover-boarding kid in a hoodie; it’s his mom or dad. In fact, the only age group with rising entrepreneurial activity in the last two decades is people between 55 and 65.

A terrible myth is surrounding millennials and entrepreneurship

businessinsider.com

Tushar Kirtane

495 days ago

When scientists began to calculate the amount of oxygen in the lungs of these free divers, and compare it to the amount that it was believed a diver would need to survive under water for any length of time, the numbers didn’t add up. Somehow, those participating in the new sport were surviving underwater with far less air for far longer than anyone had thought possible. All of which led scientists like Lundgren to ask the obvious question. What on Earth could be going on?

The Impossible Physiology of the Free Diver

nautil.us

Tushar Kirtane

495 days ago

It is very difficult to produce a lot of high quality things,” Eric Nuzum, Audible’s senior vice president of original content, told me, continuing a line he’s always held since joining the Amazon-owned group last year to oversee original content (audiobooks has been its bread and butter): that Audible’s ambitions for audio stories are huge

Audible’s answer to the podcasting world is officially out of beta, and it’s looking as ambitious as ever

niemanlab.org

Tushar Kirtane

502 days ago

The very term party leaders has become an anachronism. Although Capitol Hill and the campaign trail are miles apart, the breakdown in order in both places reflects the underlying reality that there no longer is any such thing as a party leader. There are only individual actors, pursuing their own political interests and ideological missions willy-nilly, like excited gas molecules in an overheated balloon.

How American Politics Went Insane

theatlantic.com

Tushar Kirtane

522 days ago

Netflix’s refusal to make viewership numbers available has thrown a wrench into television’s ratings-driven business models. Its pioneering practice of buying up an entire season (or two) of a series without requiring a pilot is luring writers, actors, and producers away from traditional television. And by releasing full seasons in one fell swoop and streaming them ad-free, Netflix has trained viewers to binge—and to be increasingly impatient with once-a-week episodic television and commercial breaks.And that’s just what’s on TV. Netflix is encroaching on the big screen too, outbidding incumbent studios for high-profile projects like Bright, a Will Smith cop thriller it snapped up for a reported $90 million this year. More alarmingly, it has been lobbying against traditional theater-only cinematic runs for new movie releases—leading John Fithian, CEO of the National Association of Theatre Owners trade organization, to call out Netflix at a recent conference as a “grave threat to the movie business.”

How Netflix Became Hollywood’s Frenemy

fortune.com

Tushar Kirtane

524 days ago

People are prone to resist scientific claims when they clash with intuitive beliefs. They don’t see measles or mumps around anymore. They do see children with autism. And they see a mom who says, “My child was perfectly fine until he got a vaccine and became autistic.”

Now, you can tell them that correlation is not causation. You can say that children get a vaccine every two to three months for the first couple years of their life, so the onset of any illness is bound to follow vaccination for many kids. You can say that the science shows no connection. But once an idea has got embedded and become widespread, it becomes very difficult to dig it out of people’s brains—especially when they do not trust scientific authorities. And we are experiencing a significant decline in trust in scientific authorities.

The Mistrust of Science

newyorker.com

Tushar Kirtane

527 days ago

Scientists are in agreement that even one sleepless night is the equivalent of having a few alcoholic drinks; 22 hours without sleeping has been shown to cause cognitive and reactive impairment comparable to being legally drunk.

In multibillion-dollar business of NBA, sleep is the biggest debt

cbssports.com

Tushar Kirtane

532 days ago

I guess I should be at peace now that I know why getting tickets everywhere is such a colossal mess.

o the biggest artists sign contracts that guarantee them money every time they step on the stage, and that guaranteed amount is usually more than 100 percent of the revenue if every ticket is sold at face value. Which means that if every ticket in the venue “sells out” at the face value printed on the ticket, that wouldn’t be enough to pay the artist what they are contractually guaranteed by the promoter for the performance.

Why You Can’t Get a Ticket to the NBA Finals …

theringer.com

Tushar Kirtane

532 days ago

The right to legal counsel has long been the gold standard of American justice under the Constitution. But what happens when a state refuses to budget for public defenders? Louisiana is finding out.

On the Defensive

theatlantic.com

Tushar Kirtane

532 days ago

Lazy Sunday was more than ahead of its time.

How the Lonely Island Changed the Internet, Comedy, and Especially Internet Comedy

vulture.com

Tushar Kirtane

533 days ago

Americans today are strangely averse to change. They are less likely to switch jobs, or move between states, or create new companies than they were 30 years ago. In economist-speak, "the U.S. labor market has experienced marked declines in fluidity along a variety of dimensions." In English: America has lost its mojo. Manifest Destiny has yielded to manifest dormancy.

How America Lost Its Mojo

theatlantic.com

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