Jason Huff

Design Director at Etsy. I read for design, contemporary art, and cultural critique.

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Jason Huff

22 days ago

The always provocative Adam Curtis.

So for example, I discovered that Sigmund Freud's nephew, who lived in America in the 1920s, invented public relations and using what he claimed was his uncle's theories about the unconscious.I thought, A, I didn't know that, B, it's a fascinating story. If A and B are true, everyone will be fascinated by it. I started with that, and out of that I then found many more stories about how Sigmund Freud's ideas had been used outside psychoanalysis and built that into a whole four-part series. It started with that story.

Adam Curtis on the dangers of self-expression

thecreativeindependent.com

Jason Huff

22 days ago

Julian Assange, a Man Without a Country

newyorker.com

Jason Huff

31 days ago

If you see something, say something.

I’ve been amazed and disappointed by so much of what this president had said, and his approach to running this country, which seems to be one of just a never ending divisiveness. But his comments today about those who have lost loved ones in times of war and his lies that previous presidents Obama and Bush never contacted their families are so beyond the pale, I almost don’t have the words.

Dear White People: Be More Like Gregg Popovich

theintercept.com

Jason Huff

31 days ago

Let there be justice.

In New Ruling, Federal Judge Refuses to Erase Joe Arpaio’s Conviction

theintercept.com

Jason Huff

32 days ago

How the Appetite for Emojis Complicates the Effort to Standardize the World’s Alphabets

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

33 days ago

Most people are likely to stick with the status quo even if there are big gains to be made from a change that involves just a small cost.

The flaws a Nobel Prize-winning economist wants you to know about yourself

qz.com

Jason Huff

33 days ago

As Bike-Sharing Brings Out Bad Manners, China Asks, What’s Wrong With Us?

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

34 days ago

Online dating... not so bad!

First Evidence That Online Dating Is Changing the Nature of Society

technologyreview.com

Jason Huff

34 days ago

💖 the New Inquiry and its origin story

Are.na / Blog – Rachel Rosenfelt, founder of The New Inquiry

are.na

Jason Huff

67 days ago

A great story about a decades old industry in transition as Moore's Law fades out, with excitement about what's coming next.

Chips Off the Old Block: Computers Are Taking Design Cues From Human Brains

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

69 days ago

A now common word to describe our time, fully explained and examined.

In short, “neoliberalism” is not simply a name for pro-market policies, or for the compromises with finance capitalism made by failing social democratic parties. It is a name for a premise that, quietly, has come to regulate all we practise and believe: that competition is the only legitimate organising principle for human activity.

Neoliberalism: the idea that swallowed the world

theguardian.com

Jason Huff

69 days ago

The birth of radio conspiracies and the rise of fake news in social media. Where do they intersect and where are we headed?

The Fake-News Fallacy

newyorker.com

Jason Huff

69 days ago

There is some hope in filtering out fake news.

Technology brought us fake news — and it will help us kill it

seattletimes.com

Jason Huff

74 days ago

And, as they try to be “normal,” these wealthy and affluent people deflect the stigma of wealth.

What the Rich Won’t Tell You

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

84 days ago

A study from April of his year that's worth a read, especially if you're finding this on a social platform like Facebook. Spoiler: Using Facebook frequently diminishes a sense of personal well-being.

A New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel

hbr.org

Jason Huff

84 days ago

Innovation in Africa needs more creative thinking from the folks who live there. Not multinational outside investors. Maybe Africa will innovate itself in ways and paths much faster than other countries who innovated in the 20th century.

Why Africa’s development model puzzles economists

economist.com

Jason Huff

84 days ago

David Byrne pontificating about the patterns in technology and what it all means.

Eliminating the Human

technologyreview.com

Jason Huff

90 days ago

The notion that creativity could solve these urban problems — either from above, with monumental art galleries, or from below, with bearded clusters of hipsters, is a symptom of this profound transformation.

Richard Florida Is Sorry

jacobinmag.com

Jason Huff

104 days ago

The Eternal Sunshine Of Lil Yachty

thefader.com

Jason Huff

135 days ago

True change is about taking personal accountability

A therapist outlines the 3 main reasons people never change

businessinsider.com

Jason Huff

136 days ago

We Aren’t Built to Live in the Moment

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

138 days ago

The Cyberspace we Forgot | Neuromancer

heterotopiaszine.com

Jason Huff

142 days ago

A short post to keep you aware of your consumptions habits online.

Social media was serving, at least for me, as a sponge that wicks up any stray attention—and with it, time—and then keeps drawing more of both until you consciously break away from it.

Want More Time? Get Rid of The Easiest Way to Spend It

raptitude.com

Jason Huff

142 days ago

A good quick read to help you understand nuances of cultural appropriation.

In an exchange, the more you take, the more you have to give back — the better the work has to be.

What Distinguishes Cultural Exchange from Cultural Appropriation?

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

144 days ago

A good holiday read about the future of work in America.

This ketchup-packet-hoarding approach sounds sensible, given the current lack of systemic support. Yet, as Mulcahy acknowledges, it’s a survival mechanism, not a solution.

Is the Gig Economy Working?

newyorker.com

Jason Huff

145 days ago

How would you feel if you had written a book, which was, in your own words, “derided, made fun of, or savagely attacked” by your peers?

An Early Champion of Good Sense

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

149 days ago

Stop Pretending You’re Not Rich

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

151 days ago

“Evolve or die”: Bloomberg Businessweek creative director Rob Vargas on the magazine’s redesign

itsnicethat.com

Jason Huff

167 days ago

A warm-up read on our automated future.

Drone- and satellite-based asset management. Drones equipped with cameras can perform regular external inspections of commercial structures, like bridges or airplanes, with the images automatically analyzed to detect any new cracks or changes to surfaces.

8 Ways Machine Learning Is Improving Companies’ Work Processes

hbr.org

Jason Huff

167 days ago

From my experience teaching, this is good advice.

The Traditional Lecture Is Dead. I Would Know—I’m a Professor

wired.com

Jason Huff

169 days ago

Just some daydreaming about our computerized future and full digitized copies of human brains.

8 Staggering Predictions From Ray Kurzweil

inverse.com

Jason Huff

171 days ago

An argument for having a strong opinion of your own, and sharing it.

How would you feel if you had written a book, which was, in your own words, “derided, made fun of, or savagely attacked” by your peers?

An Early Champion of Good Sense

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

171 days ago

This is just a quick summary. If it makes you curious, read the entire presentation linked in the intro.

Mary Meeker’s 2017 internet trends report: All the slides, plus analysis

recode.net

Jason Huff

171 days ago

The results revealed that being unpopular — feeling isolated, disconnected, lonely — predicts our life span. More surprising is just how powerful this effect can be. Dr. Holt-Lunstad found that people who had larger networks of friends had a 50 percent increased chance of survival by the end of the study they were in. And those who had good-quality relationships had a 91 percent higher survival rate. This suggests that being unpopular increases our chance of death more strongly than obesity, physical inactivity or binge drinking. In fact, the only comparable health hazard is smoking.

Popular People Live Longer

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

171 days ago

This is what a brutalist world would look like on your phone

theverge.com

Jason Huff

172 days ago

Perel has worked as a couples therapist for thirty-three years. In that time, the makeup of couples and families has changed drastically—the series includes sessions with gay, lesbian, trans, and polyamorous couples—but the basic tenets of her trade have stayed the same. People still yearn for love and intimacy; they want to be desired just as much as they fear rejection. But the technological age has also changed the life of the couple, as it has changed life of every kind. The “send” button is a fickle thing.

Esther Perel Lets Us Listen In on Couples’ Secrets

newyorker.com

Jason Huff

172 days ago

After all, there comes a point when the bill for guarding your wealth exceeds the cost of redistributing some of it, so you won’t need so many guards.

Technology is making the world more unequal. Only technology can fix this

theguardian.com

Jason Huff

184 days ago

A Short History of Empathy

theatlantic.com

Jason Huff

184 days ago

A Short History of Empathy

theatlantic.com

Jason Huff

190 days ago

How To Be More Productive by Working Less

markmanson.net

Jason Huff

195 days ago

As devices from watches to cars connect to the internet, the volume is increasing: some estimate that a self-driving car will generate 100 gigabytes per second. Meanwhile, artificial-intelligence (AI) techniques such as machine learning extract more value from data. Algorithms can predict when a customer is ready to buy, a jet-engine needs servicing or a person is at risk of a disease. Industrial giants such as GE and Siemens now sell themselves as data firms.

The world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil, but data

economist.com

Jason Huff

201 days ago

Innovation and wealth accumulation has more than just a financial cost to the public. It’s complicated.

To live in the Bay Area is to face skyrocketing rents, threats of displacement and evictions. It’s to hear about techies moving in, to hear about even techies being priced out. It’s to watch glistening tech campuses go up as the gulf between those who make the tech and those who just happen to be here widens.

“When people think Silicon Valley, they think ‘pot of gold,’ ” said Dorothy Niblock, 90, a Plaza del Rey resident who lives alone in the two-bedroom mobile home she designed with her late husband 44 years ago. “That doesn’t really apply to us.”

In Silicon Valley, even mobile homes are getting too pricey for longtime residents

latimes.com

Jason Huff

201 days ago

Read this and think about two things: unemployment and global warming. Then think about the current political climate and policy discussions as a great distraction from what lies ahead for the future elders of American society.

Bottom Line: The goal of America’s energy sector isn’t to create as many jobs as possible (as the NYT article would apparently have us believe) especially the politically-favored and heavily-subsidized renewable energy jobs. Rather, the economic goal is to produce as much electric power as possible at the lowest possible cost, and that means we want the fewest number of energy workers!

Inconvenient energy fact: It takes 79 solar workers to produce same amount of electric power as one coal worker

aei.org

Jason Huff

203 days ago

Before the machines become smart enough to replace humans, as some people fear, the machines need teachers. Now, some companies are taking the first steps, deploying artificial intelligence in the workplace and asking their employees to train the A.I. to be more human.

Meet the People Who Train the Robots (to Do Their Own Jobs)

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

203 days ago

Before the machines become smart enough to replace humans, as some people fear, the machines need teachers. Now, some companies are taking the first steps, deploying artificial intelligence in the workplace and asking their employees to train the A.I. to be more human.

Meet the People Who Train the Robots (to Do Their Own Jobs)

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

207 days ago

When thinking about your career. Focus on skills and outcomes over discipline. Reasonable advice for a future world with more AI and robots helping out.

Rather than encouraging each person to choose a profession, say, architect or engineer, he works backwards from the skills that each student wants to acquire.

The next generation of jobs won’t be made up of professions

bbc.com

Jason Huff

207 days ago

There was a time when irony was supposed to have died—when Americans, frightened and weary, worried that the world had robbed them of their constitutional right to laughter. They needn’t have fretted: Irony—satire—political discourse that operates through the productive hedge of the joke—have not only evaded death in past decades; they have, instead, been enjoying a renaissance.

Are We Having Too Much Fun?

theatlantic.com

Jason Huff

210 days ago

There are few things scarier than a scientist who can give an academic talk on how to shoot a human being but can’t reason about whether you should be shooting them at all.

Hey, Computer Scientists! Stop Hating on the Humanities

wired.com

Jason Huff

211 days ago

Thanks to the wonderful tools of digital society, we are theoretically able to give and receive more support than ever. Social media platforms let us learn more about one another and stay in constant touch, so we tend to assume this knowledge promotes empathy and connectedness. We feel more educated about structural inequality problems and global humanitarian issues. Yet who’s doing the actual work of teaching?

The Boundaries of Artificial Emotional Intelligence

howwegettonext.com

Jason Huff

215 days ago

"Better late than never" a new climate change slogan.

Kim Stanley Robinson’s New York 2140 is a glorious thought experiment on climate change

theverge.com

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