Jason Huff

Design Director at Etsy. I read for design, contemporary art, and cultural critique.

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Jason Huff

2 days ago

Incredible read for understanding the roots of current debates around technology and the underlying problems.

Engineers try to do politics by changing infrastructure.

That’s what they do. They tweak infrastructure. It’s a little bit like an ancient Roman trying to shape public debate by reconfiguring the Forum. “We’ll have seven new entrances instead of six, and the debate will change.”

The engineering world doesn’t have a conception of how to intervene in debate that isn’t infrastructural.

Don't Be Evil

logicmag.io

Jason Huff

13 days ago

A quick read assessing the three waves of our automated future.

PwC economists assess how and when workers will be affected by coming waves of automation

pwc.co.uk

Jason Huff

13 days ago

Three out of five American parents in a 2017 poll conducted on behalf of Facebook and the National PTA (one of the groups Facebook consulted while building Messenger Kids) said that their under-13-year-olds use messaging apps, social media, or both. If you take into account sneakier kids and more oblivious parents, the real figure is likely to be much higher.

Facebook’s app for kids should freak parents out

technologyreview.com

Jason Huff

29 days ago

The threat of tough regulation in Asia sends crypto-currencies into a tailspin

economist.com

Jason Huff

39 days ago

Call me cynical. Call me a skeptic. Call me a Ravenclaw with a dash of Slytherin. The point is, I always regarded personality quizzes as strangely addictive horse hockey, good for trading memes with friends, excellent at consuming your cash (or your employer’s — sorry, Nate), but not much more.

Most Personality Quizzes Are Junk Science. I Found One That Isn’t.

fivethirtyeight.com

Jason Huff

39 days ago

Excited to see this exhibition when I’m back in NYC.

Back in the Bronx: Gordon Matta-Clark, Rogue Sculptor

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

45 days ago

William Faulkner - Banquet Speech

nobelprize.org

Jason Huff

54 days ago

This is a generation that is dominated by feelings, not by facts. The irony is that boomers criticize millennials for being snowflakes, for being too driven by feelings. But the boomers are the first big feelings generation. They’re highly motivated by feelings and not persuaded by facts. And you can see this in their policies.

Take this whole fantasy about trickle-down economics. Maybe it was worth a shot, but it doesn’t work. We know it doesn’t work. The evidence is overwhelming. The experiment is over. And yet they’re still clinging to this dogma, and indeed the latest tax bill is the latest example of that.

Time after time, when facts collided with feelings, the boomers chose feelings.

How the baby boomers — not millennials — screwed America

vox.com

Jason Huff

54 days ago

The idea that millennials are capriciously wrecking the landscape of American consumption grants quite a bit of power to a group that is still on the younger side.

Where Millennials Come From

newyorker.com

Jason Huff

56 days ago

“Knowing has become obsolete,” Dwane says. “Learning has become our true currency. We’re not knowledge workers. We’re learning workers. If you aren’t actively trying to learn, no one can help you. If you make it central to your professional life, no one can stop you.”

The ‘Adaptable Leader’ is the New Holy Grail — Become One, Hire One

firstround.com

Jason Huff

59 days ago

Artwork Personalization at Netflix

medium.com

Jason Huff

72 days ago

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On December 5 the DeepMind group published a new paper at the site of Cornell University called "Mastering Chess and Shogi by Self-Play with a General Reinforcement Learning Algorithm", and the results were nothing short of staggering.

The future is here – AlphaZero learns chess

en.chessbase.com

Jason Huff

72 days ago

A great way to frame the different types of work we do in our daily lives.

Maker vs. Manager: How Your Schedule Can Make or Break You

fs.blog

Jason Huff

77 days ago

Worth reading for the photo alone.

Chinese bike share graveyard a monument to industry's 'arrogance'

theguardian.com

Jason Huff

87 days ago

Always love a good critique of an idealistic and capitalistic tech conference.

Monetising millennials: what the corporate world thinks it knows about young people

theguardian.com

Jason Huff

111 days ago

The always provocative Adam Curtis.

So for example, I discovered that Sigmund Freud's nephew, who lived in America in the 1920s, invented public relations and using what he claimed was his uncle's theories about the unconscious.I thought, A, I didn't know that, B, it's a fascinating story. If A and B are true, everyone will be fascinated by it. I started with that, and out of that I then found many more stories about how Sigmund Freud's ideas had been used outside psychoanalysis and built that into a whole four-part series. It started with that story.

Adam Curtis on the dangers of self-expression

thecreativeindependent.com

Jason Huff

111 days ago

Julian Assange, a Man Without a Country

newyorker.com

Jason Huff

120 days ago

If you see something, say something.

I’ve been amazed and disappointed by so much of what this president had said, and his approach to running this country, which seems to be one of just a never ending divisiveness. But his comments today about those who have lost loved ones in times of war and his lies that previous presidents Obama and Bush never contacted their families are so beyond the pale, I almost don’t have the words.

Dear White People: Be More Like Gregg Popovich

theintercept.com

Jason Huff

120 days ago

Let there be justice.

In New Ruling, Federal Judge Refuses to Erase Joe Arpaio’s Conviction

theintercept.com

Jason Huff

121 days ago

How the Appetite for Emojis Complicates the Effort to Standardize the World’s Alphabets

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

122 days ago

Most people are likely to stick with the status quo even if there are big gains to be made from a change that involves just a small cost.

The flaws a Nobel Prize-winning economist wants you to know about yourself

qz.com

Jason Huff

122 days ago

As Bike-Sharing Brings Out Bad Manners, China Asks, What’s Wrong With Us?

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

123 days ago

Online dating... not so bad!

First Evidence That Online Dating Is Changing the Nature of Society

technologyreview.com

Jason Huff

123 days ago

💖 the New Inquiry and its origin story

Are.na / Blog – Rachel Rosenfelt, founder of The New Inquiry

are.na

Jason Huff

156 days ago

A great story about a decades old industry in transition as Moore's Law fades out, with excitement about what's coming next.

Chips Off the Old Block: Computers Are Taking Design Cues From Human Brains

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

158 days ago

A now common word to describe our time, fully explained and examined.

In short, “neoliberalism” is not simply a name for pro-market policies, or for the compromises with finance capitalism made by failing social democratic parties. It is a name for a premise that, quietly, has come to regulate all we practise and believe: that competition is the only legitimate organising principle for human activity.

Neoliberalism: the idea that swallowed the world

theguardian.com

Jason Huff

158 days ago

The birth of radio conspiracies and the rise of fake news in social media. Where do they intersect and where are we headed?

The Fake-News Fallacy

newyorker.com

Jason Huff

158 days ago

There is some hope in filtering out fake news.

Technology brought us fake news — and it will help us kill it

seattletimes.com

Jason Huff

163 days ago

And, as they try to be “normal,” these wealthy and affluent people deflect the stigma of wealth.

What the Rich Won’t Tell You

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

173 days ago

A study from April of his year that's worth a read, especially if you're finding this on a social platform like Facebook. Spoiler: Using Facebook frequently diminishes a sense of personal well-being.

A New, More Rigorous Study Confirms: The More You Use Facebook, the Worse You Feel

hbr.org

Jason Huff

173 days ago

Innovation in Africa needs more creative thinking from the folks who live there. Not multinational outside investors. Maybe Africa will innovate itself in ways and paths much faster than other countries who innovated in the 20th century.

Why Africa’s development model puzzles economists

economist.com

Jason Huff

173 days ago

David Byrne pontificating about the patterns in technology and what it all means.

Eliminating the Human

technologyreview.com

Jason Huff

179 days ago

The notion that creativity could solve these urban problems — either from above, with monumental art galleries, or from below, with bearded clusters of hipsters, is a symptom of this profound transformation.

Richard Florida Is Sorry

jacobinmag.com

Jason Huff

193 days ago

The Eternal Sunshine Of Lil Yachty

thefader.com

Jason Huff

224 days ago

True change is about taking personal accountability

A therapist outlines the 3 main reasons people never change

businessinsider.com

Jason Huff

225 days ago

We Aren’t Built to Live in the Moment

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

227 days ago

The Cyberspace we Forgot | Neuromancer

heterotopiaszine.com

Jason Huff

231 days ago

A short post to keep you aware of your consumptions habits online.

Social media was serving, at least for me, as a sponge that wicks up any stray attention—and with it, time—and then keeps drawing more of both until you consciously break away from it.

Want More Time? Get Rid of The Easiest Way to Spend It

raptitude.com

Jason Huff

231 days ago

A good quick read to help you understand nuances of cultural appropriation.

In an exchange, the more you take, the more you have to give back — the better the work has to be.

What Distinguishes Cultural Exchange from Cultural Appropriation?

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

233 days ago

A good holiday read about the future of work in America.

This ketchup-packet-hoarding approach sounds sensible, given the current lack of systemic support. Yet, as Mulcahy acknowledges, it’s a survival mechanism, not a solution.

Is the Gig Economy Working?

newyorker.com

Jason Huff

234 days ago

How would you feel if you had written a book, which was, in your own words, “derided, made fun of, or savagely attacked” by your peers?

An Early Champion of Good Sense

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

238 days ago

Stop Pretending You’re Not Rich

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

240 days ago

“Evolve or die”: Bloomberg Businessweek creative director Rob Vargas on the magazine’s redesign

itsnicethat.com

Jason Huff

256 days ago

A warm-up read on our automated future.

Drone- and satellite-based asset management. Drones equipped with cameras can perform regular external inspections of commercial structures, like bridges or airplanes, with the images automatically analyzed to detect any new cracks or changes to surfaces.

8 Ways Machine Learning Is Improving Companies’ Work Processes

hbr.org

Jason Huff

256 days ago

From my experience teaching, this is good advice.

The Traditional Lecture Is Dead. I Would Know—I’m a Professor

wired.com

Jason Huff

258 days ago

Just some daydreaming about our computerized future and full digitized copies of human brains.

8 Staggering Predictions From Ray Kurzweil

inverse.com

Jason Huff

260 days ago

An argument for having a strong opinion of your own, and sharing it.

How would you feel if you had written a book, which was, in your own words, “derided, made fun of, or savagely attacked” by your peers?

An Early Champion of Good Sense

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

260 days ago

This is just a quick summary. If it makes you curious, read the entire presentation linked in the intro.

Mary Meeker’s 2017 internet trends report: All the slides, plus analysis

recode.net

Jason Huff

260 days ago

The results revealed that being unpopular — feeling isolated, disconnected, lonely — predicts our life span. More surprising is just how powerful this effect can be. Dr. Holt-Lunstad found that people who had larger networks of friends had a 50 percent increased chance of survival by the end of the study they were in. And those who had good-quality relationships had a 91 percent higher survival rate. This suggests that being unpopular increases our chance of death more strongly than obesity, physical inactivity or binge drinking. In fact, the only comparable health hazard is smoking.

Popular People Live Longer

nytimes.com

Jason Huff

260 days ago

This is what a brutalist world would look like on your phone

theverge.com

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