Josh Hollingsworth

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Josh Hollingsworth

108 days ago

Statins (January 2018)

wanderingsolace.com

Josh Hollingsworth

118 days ago

Compound vs. isolation exercises: which is best? [Study review]

bayesianbodybuilding.com

Josh Hollingsworth

118 days ago

Resistance Training with Single vs. Multi-joint Exercises at Equal Total Load Volume

frontiersin.org

Josh Hollingsworth

142 days ago

Studies indicate that most children reach their activity peak at about age 7 and become more sedentary throughout adolescence.

Activity Trackers Don’t Always Work the Way We Want Them To

nytimes.com

Josh Hollingsworth

143 days ago

Healthy Habits — Meet The Company Trying To Hook You For The Right Reasons

medium.com

Josh Hollingsworth

150 days ago

Clinical Practice Guidelines or Legalized Bribery?

medium.com

Josh Hollingsworth

153 days ago

We are not a wearable company anymore.

Nike exec looks back at FuelBand’s rise and fall, talks lessons of wearables 1.0

mobihealthnews.com

Josh Hollingsworth

157 days ago

The Useless Concept of ‘Calories’

medium.com

Josh Hollingsworth

158 days ago

The Difference Between Professionals and Amateurs

jamesclear.com

Josh Hollingsworth

159 days ago

Don’t Let New Blood Pressure Guidelines Raise Yours

nytimes.com

Josh Hollingsworth

162 days ago

Statins can cause muscle DAMAGE: New storm over statins as experts fight over the benefits

express.co.uk

Josh Hollingsworth

164 days ago

Saturated Fat. On your Plate or in your Blood?

feinmantheother.com

Josh Hollingsworth

164 days ago

Rather, a focus on the sources of those calories consumed (i.e. processed versus real food) and on the metabolic changes that result from consuming foods of different types needs to be addressed[26]. In particular, calorie-focused thinking is inherently biased against high-fat foods, many of which appear to be protective against obesity and the diseases of metabolic syndrome, and supportive of refined starch and sugar replacements, which are clearly detrimental, and exclusive of the

pharmaceutical-journal.com

Josh Hollingsworth

168 days ago

The analysis also showed exercises performed using one’s own body weight without specific equipment were just as effective as gym-based training.

Strength exercise as vital as aerobic new research finds

sydney.edu.au

Josh Hollingsworth

169 days ago

A Simple Guide to Cholesterol on Low Carb – Part I

cholesterolcode.com

Josh Hollingsworth

169 days ago

26 time-management tricks I wish I'd known at 20

businessinsider.com

Josh Hollingsworth

171 days ago

Is Fruit Healthy?

roguehealthandfitness.com

Josh Hollingsworth

171 days ago

Relative risk seems a bit alarming, but absolute risk is still very small. Only ~4 more cases per 10,000 patients per year.

Over-the-counter and prescription acid reflux pills taken by millions 'raise the risk of stomach cancer by up to eight-fold' if they are used regularly

dailymail.co.uk

Josh Hollingsworth

171 days ago

‘Unbelievable’: Heart Stents Fail to Ease Chest Pain

nytimes.com

Josh Hollingsworth

202 days ago

Does Fasting cause (or cure) Hunger?

medium.com

Josh Hollingsworth

203 days ago

Mandate is clear: Flawed dietary guidelines process must be reformed

thehill.com

Josh Hollingsworth

259 days ago

How to learn anything faster: Don’t read books.

medium.com

Josh Hollingsworth

261 days ago

Get More Done With the Rule of 3

artofmanliness.com

Josh Hollingsworth

263 days ago

Why Deep Breathing May Keep Us Calm

nytimes.com

Josh Hollingsworth

268 days ago

Nutrition science isn’t broken, it’s just wicked hard

washingtonpost.com

Josh Hollingsworth

268 days ago

Low-carb vs. low-fat: New research says it doesn’t really matter

washingtonpost.com

Josh Hollingsworth

271 days ago

So how should we respond the next time we’re asked to believe that an association implies a cause and effect, that some medication or some facet of our diet or lifestyle is either killing us or making us healthier? We can fall back on several guiding principles, these skeptical epidemiologists say. One is to assume that the first report of an association is incorrect or meaningless, no matter how big that association might be. After all, it’s the first claim in any scientific endeavor that is most likely to be wrong. Only after that report is made public will the authors have the opportunity to be informed by their peers of all the many ways that they might have simply misinterpreted what they saw. The regrettable reality, of course, is that it’s this first report that is most newsworthy. So be skeptical.

If the association appears consistently in study after study, population after population, but is small — in the range of tens of percent — then doubt it. For the individual, such small associations, even if real, will have only minor effects or no effect on overall health or risk of disease. They can have enormous public-health implications, but they’re also small enough to be treated with suspicion until a clinical trial demonstrates their validity.

If the association involves some aspect of human behavior, which is, of course, the case with the great majority of the epidemiology that attracts our attention, then question its validity. If taking a pill, eating a diet or living in proximity to some potentially noxious aspect of the environment is associated with a particular risk of disease, then other factors of socioeconomic status, education, medical care and the whole gamut of healthy-user effects are as well. These will make the association, for all practical purposes, impossible to interpret reliably.

Do We Really Know What Makes Us Healthy?

nytimes.com

Josh Hollingsworth

299 days ago

Mainly play the things on the piano which please you, even if the teacher does not assign those. That is the way to learn the most, that when you are doing something with such enjoyment that you don't notice that the time passes. I am sometimes so wrapped up in my work that I forget about the noon meal. . . .

Here's Einstein's Advice to His Son on How to Accelerate Learning

inc.com

Josh Hollingsworth

316 days ago

The science is in: exercise won’t help you lose much weight

vox.com

Josh Hollingsworth

334 days ago

Inversion: The Crucial Thinking Skill Nobody Ever Taught You

jamesclear.com

Josh Hollingsworth

373 days ago

The same way second-hand smoke harms the lungs of people around the smoker, smartphones harm the attention and focus of people around the smartphone user.

Smartphones Are the New Cigarettes

markmanson.net

Josh Hollingsworth

373 days ago

Sugar fixation hampering obesity battle

medicalxpress.com

Josh Hollingsworth

386 days ago

Follow This 4-Step Routine Every Friday

medium.com

Josh Hollingsworth

386 days ago

Costly Doctors Don’t Provide Better Care

nytimes.com

Josh Hollingsworth

386 days ago

Is It Harder to Lose Weight When You’re Older?

nytimes.com

Josh Hollingsworth

386 days ago

Soda or Bear Claw? Panera to Post Added Sugar in Drinks It Sells

nytimes.com

Josh Hollingsworth

386 days ago

A Positive Outlook May Be Good for Your Health

nytimes.com

Josh Hollingsworth

386 days ago

Nothing will change until you start building.

medium.freecodecamp.org

Josh Hollingsworth

387 days ago

A Look at The DASH Diet 20 Years Later

youtube.com

Josh Hollingsworth

388 days ago

The share of Americans that own smartphones is now 77%, up from just 35% in Pew Research Center’s first survey of smartphone ownership conducted in 2011.

Mobile Fact Sheet

pewinternet.org

Josh Hollingsworth

389 days ago

Nutrition myths — busted!

heartandstroke.ca

Josh Hollingsworth

390 days ago

The 1 Percent Rule states that over time the majority of the rewards in a given field will accumulate to the people, teams, and organizations that maintain a 1 percent advantage over the alternatives. You don't need to be twice as good to get twice the results. You just need to be slightly better.

The 1 Percent Rule is not merely a reference to the fact that small differences accumulate into significant advantages, but also to the idea that those who are one percent better rule their respective fields and industries. Thus, the process of accumulative advantage is the hidden engine that drives the 80/20 Rule.

The 1 Percent Rule: Why a Few People Get Most of the Rewards

jamesclear.com

Josh Hollingsworth

390 days ago

Can Harvard’s most popular professor (and Confucius) radically change your life?

theguardian.com

Josh Hollingsworth

391 days ago

I gave up TV, then qualified for Olympic marathon trials and got my PhD

washingtonpost.com

Josh Hollingsworth

391 days ago

Yuval Harari on why humans won’t dominate Earth in 300 years

vox.com

Josh Hollingsworth

392 days ago

Why Deep Work Matters in a Distracted World

blog.evernote.com

Josh Hollingsworth

393 days ago

How Exercise Shapes You, Far Beyond the Gym

thecut.com

Josh Hollingsworth

393 days ago

Control what you can. Don't waste energy worrying about the rest.

The Only Thing You Need to Get Good At

raptitude.com

Josh Hollingsworth

399 days ago

The Disciplined Pursuit of Less

hbr.org

Josh Hollingsworth

401 days ago

Why time management is ruining our lives

theguardian.com

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