Gil Doron

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Gil Doron

5 days ago

This phenomenon — which is sometimes referred to as “everything as a service,” abbreviated as XaaS and pronounced “zass,” among the kinds of people who say these things out loud — has quietly reshaped the entire economy. Trucking companies that once bought Michelin tires now rent them through a pay-per-mile service. Airlines that buy $15 million jet engines from General Electric can subscribe to OnPoint, a “power by the hour” program that includes maintenance costs and data-analysis tools. G.E. Aviation now makes the better part of its revenue from services like these.

The auto industry was slow to come to grips with this new model — in part because it long ago gave away the entire service piece of its business to gas stations, body shops, Jiffy Lubes and a hundred other barnacle industries. Thanks to old and byzantine state laws, most carmakers aren’t even allowed to sell or lease directly to their customers — every transaction has to go through an independent dealer. When it comes to data, automakers are flying blind. As Reilly P. Brennan, a venture capitalist who invests in self-driving technology, put it to me: “The urinal in the men’s bathroom knows more about its users than most carmakers in 2017.”

Can Ford Turn Itself Into a Tech Company?

nytimes.com

Gil Doron

5 days ago

Microsoft has been hiring this type of person for years now: career-focused, monetarily-motivated generalists. In other words, the exact sort of person who does not do well in a functional organization that values expertise and experience.

Why Microsoft’s reorganization is a bad idea

stratechery.com

Gil Doron

19 days ago

First, what is Mara's domain? Where does he operate? At one point the Buddha indicated that each of the five skandhas, or the five aggregates, as well as the mind, mental states and mental consciousness are all declared to be Mara. Mara symbolizes the entire existence of unenlightened humanity. In other words, Mara's realm is the whole of samsaric existence. Mara saturates every nook and cranny of life. Only in Nirvana is his influence unknown. Second, how does Mara operate? Herein lays the key to Mara's influence over all unenlightened beings. The Pali Canon gives initial answers, not as alternatives, but as varying terms. First, Mara behaves like one of the demons of [then] popular thought. He uses deceptions, disguises, and threats, he possesses people, and he uses all kinds of horrible phenomena to terrify or cause confusion. Mara's most effective weapon is sustaining a climate of fear, whether the fear be of drought or famine or cancer or terrorism. Identifying with a desire or fear tightens the knot that binds one to it, and, thereby, the sway it can have over one."

The Demon Mara

thoughtco.com

Gil Doron

19 days ago

Maara as 'the personification of Death, the Evil One, the Tempter (the Buddhist counterpart of the Devil or Principle of Destruction).' He continues: 'The legends concerning Maara are, in the books, very involved and defy any attempts at unraveling them.'"

The Demon Mara

thoughtco.com

Gil Doron

20 days ago

Facebook, meanwhile, is now capable of identifying you in pictures without seeing your face; it only needs your clothes, hair and body type to tag you in an image with 83 per cent accuracy.

Big data meets Big Brother as China moves to rate its citizens

wired.co.uk

Gil Doron

34 days ago

All these companies are different, but the pattern is the same: start with a small, specific market, scale up, and always have an account of how robust you are going forward. The best way to fail is to invert this recipe by starting big and shrinking. Pets.com, Webvan, and Kozmo.com made this mistake. There are many modes of failure. But not being honest about objective market conditions is a sort of failure paradigm. You can’t succeed by believing your own rhetoric over reality except by luck.

Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup - Class 4 Notes Essay

blakemasters.com

Gil Doron

34 days ago

The best kind of business is thus one where you can tell a compelling story about the future. The stories will all be different, but they take the same form: find a small target market, become the best in the world at serving it, take over immediately adjacent markets, widen the aperture of what you’re doing, and capture more and more. Once the operation is quite large, some combination of network effects, technology, scale advantages, or even brand should make it very hard for others to follow. That is the recipe for building valuable businesses.

Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup - Class 4 Notes Essay

blakemasters.com

Gil Doron

34 days ago

The best kind of business is thus one where you can tell a compelling story about the future. The stories will all be different, but they take the same form: find a small target market, become the best in the world at serving it, take over immediately adjacent markets, widen the aperture of what you’re doing, and capture more and more. Once the operation is quite large, some combination of network effects, technology, scale advantages, or even brand should make it very hard for others to follow. That is the recipe for building valuable businesses.

Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup - Class 4 Notes Essay

blakemasters.com

Gil Doron

34 days ago

Too often, we seem to forget that it’s genuine accomplishment we’re after, and we just train people to compete forever. But that does everyone a great disservice if what’s theoretically optimal is to manage to stop competing, i.e. to become a monopoly and enjoy success.

Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup - Class 4 Notes Essay

blakemasters.com

Gil Doron

34 days ago

Great companies do three things. First, they create value. Second, they are lasting or permanent in a meaningful way. Finally, they capture at least some of the value they create.

Peter Thiel’s CS183: Startup - Class 3 Notes Essay

blakemasters.com

Gil Doron

49 days ago

It infuriated him that we needed more from him—intimacy, emotional maturity, commitment—none of the things he was capable of. Sadly, he thought the image should be enough.”

The Broke Broker: He’s Got Keys to the Best Apartments, But Lacks One of His Own

observer.com

Gil Doron

50 days ago

Mackay was right that there were insanely high prices: those prices, though, were for options; if the actual price of tulips were lower on the strike date for the options, then the owner of the option only needed to pay a small percentage of the contract price (ultimately 3.5%). Meanwhile, though, actual spot prices and futures (that locked in a price) stayed flat.

Stratechery by Ben Thompson

stratechery.com

Gil Doron

52 days ago

adding 2.3 billion people by 2050 amounts to enormous additional resource use and pollution (including greenhouse gases).

I’m an environmental journalist, but I never write about overpopulation. Here’s why.

vox.com

Gil Doron

53 days ago

Willpower is for people who haven’t made up their minds. Commitment, on the other hand — if it’s a true commitment — is a point of no return. There is no chance for withdrawal. As Steven Kotler reminds us: “This is what the self-help books don’t tell you. Fully alive and deeply committed is a risky business.Once you strip away the platitudes, a life of passion and purpose will always cost, as T.S. Eliot reminds us, ‘Not less than everything.’”

This Psychological Study Teaches How To Re-Invent Your Identity, Turn-Back Time, And Hack Your Biology

journal.thriveglobal.com

Gil Doron

54 days ago

John Stuart Mill explains it very well. He said, ‘The source of everything respectable in man, either as an intellectual or as a moral being, is that his errors are corrigible.’ The whole strength and value of human judgment depends on the one property that it can be set right when it is wrong.’ You have to tell people when you think they're wrong or their work isn’t good enough,” Scott says.

Radical Candor — The Surprising Secret to Being a Good Boss

firstround.com

Gil Doron

54 days ago

Guidance, which is fundamentally just praise and criticism, is usually called “feedback,” but feedback is screechy and makes us want to put our hands over our ears. Guidance is something most of us long for.

Radical Candor — The Surprising Secret to Being a Good Boss

firstround.com

Gil Doron

54 days ago

Because you get to shape the environment and decide the roles you will play, you can make quantum leaps in your personal and professional development. The process is simple:

1. Determine your goal.

2. Commit to your goal by leaping into situations that require you to live up to your goal.

3. Determine the roles you will need to play in the various situations you create.

4. Act the part until you become the part.

5. Develop relationships with people who have your back and can help you achieve your goals.

6. Repeat — but at higher levels, with more strenuous leaps.

This Psychological Study Teaches How To Re-Invent Your Identity, Turn-Back Time, And Hack Your Biology

journal.thriveglobal.com

Gil Doron

54 days ago

Just because you’ve played a role in the past doesn’t mean you are wedded to that role. If your current context requires something different, dismiss who you’ve been in the past. Allow yourself to evolve. Quit putting yourself in a box.

This Psychological Study Teaches How To Re-Invent Your Identity, Turn-Back Time, And Hack Your Biology

journal.thriveglobal.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

MAKE YOUR JOB IRRELEVANT

This is the key to all advancement in life. Make your job irrelevant. Burn the bridges behind you.

Ep. 222: Ryan Holiday – The Essential Question: How To Live A Good Life

jamesaltucher.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

Latin means ‘a love of fate…’ You look forward to the bad things because they were made just for you.”

Ep. 222: Ryan Holiday – The Essential Question: How To Live A Good Life

jamesaltucher.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

I’m not mad at the world for leaving me on the floor. I’m grateful. Because it let me pick myself up. It let me choose myself.

Ep. 222: Ryan Holiday – The Essential Question: How To Live A Good Life

jamesaltucher.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

LOOK FORWARD TO THE BAD THINGS

People are losing their jobs. And they’re afraid. I asked Ryan if the Stoics have a practice for fear.

He said, “The Stoics call that amor fati, which in Latin means ‘a love of fate…’ You look forward to the bad things because they were made just for you.”

Ep. 222: Ryan Holiday – The Essential Question: How To Live A Good Life

jamesaltucher.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

It is most tempting to not do things when you most need to do things

6 helpful reminders for the overwhelmed person

raptitude.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

5. Things change pretty quickly when you start doing things instead of thinking so much
The darkness in the overwhelmed person’s mind comes from the feeling of helplessness, and helplessness comes from the belief that nothing you do matters. Although this feeling is common, it is almost never true. However bad the external circumstances actually get, they are probably not quite Auschwitz, and even there you would be able to fall back on Viktor Frankl’s great discovery — that nobody can take away your freedom to choose your way of relating to your circumstances. Wherever you are, you can do something to make the rest of the day better than it would otherwise be, and that means you are not helpless. No matter how small the action, once you see you are capable of improving your position, the feeling of helplessness cannot survive unless you want it to.

6 helpful reminders for the overwhelmed person

raptitude.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

To know you are a pessimist is to know that things are generally better than they appear to be. A pessimistic mind will usually create a mental image of the situation that’s much more dangerous and difficult to address than it ultimately will be in real life.

6 helpful reminders for the overwhelmed person

raptitude.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

Pessimistic tendencies may aid self-preservation overall, across a lifetime of ambiguous situations, but this comes at the cost of increased stress and a lot of unnecessary running from things.

6 helpful reminders for the overwhelmed person

raptitude.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

From an evolutionary perspective, it’s not hard to understand why we tend toward catastrophizing our setbacks. If you run from every snake just because it may be a deadly one, then you’re less likely to die by snakebite, even though 85% of the time you are running from a creature that ought to be running from you. Pessimistic tendencies may aid self-preservation overall, across a lifetime of ambiguous situations, but this comes at the cost of increased stress and a lot of unnecessary running from things.

6 helpful reminders for the overwhelmed person

raptitude.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

One maddening tendency of any small electronic device is that whenever the battery is low, it wastes most of its remaining power beeping and flashing to tell you that battery is low.

6 helpful reminders for the overwhelmed person

raptitude.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

Kindness is a side effect of not trying to control situations. And reaching for experience is often more fun and interesting than reaching for material items.

Often, the best thing for emotional health is to find what satisfies you from within, instead of outsourcing the choices about your happiness and self-esteem to others.

Bestselling Author and Investor James Altucher on Choosing Yourself and Stoic Minimalism

dailystoic.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

I call it “Choice-ism”. A larger part of my day is spent doing things I choose to do, instead of things that are chosen for me because of belongings of any sort.

Bestselling Author and Investor James Altucher on Choosing Yourself and Stoic Minimalism

dailystoic.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

The goal wasn’t to always feel good. There was no goal. I just wanted to live this way. And it’s ok to sometimes feel sad. So often we want to be vaccinated against sadness and sentimentality. But there is no vaccine. Every day I miss something.

Bestselling Author and Investor James Altucher on Choosing Yourself and Stoic Minimalism

dailystoic.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

The key is right there, on our side of the door. But so often we refuse to use it. We want someone else to release us from jail. We want someone to choose us. For a job. A promotion. A relationship. A book deal. Etc.

Bestselling Author and Investor James Altucher on Choosing Yourself and Stoic Minimalism

dailystoic.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

But the key is on our side! Nobody can unlock the prison door except us.

Bestselling Author and Investor James Altucher on Choosing Yourself and Stoic Minimalism

dailystoic.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

Perhaps the only difference (and I actually don’t think there is a difference between the three philosophies) is that in these more eastern varieties of stoicism, surrender leads to a deep love for our life because we see how vast and awe-inspiring is the world and nature that we can’t control. Surrendering to it gives us a bigger view of what is around us. Rather than the small binary view of what we can control and what we can’t.

Bestselling Author and Investor James Altucher on Choosing Yourself and Stoic Minimalism

dailystoic.com

Gil Doron

58 days ago

I have to remind myself constantly, I am just a drop of water in the ocean. And ultimately that drop of water dissolves and is absorbed by this giant ocean of life around us. And that’s it. That’s the summation of my life.

It doesn’t mean I shouldn’t enjoy being this drop. What a pleasure it is to participate in life. But I’m just participating it. I’m not the ocean. And I have no influence over the waves that spin me around, or the sun that heats me, or the land all around that I could spill into.

On the one hand this sounds “stoic”. Stoicism is not about avoiding pleasure. Pursue pleasure. Pursue knowledge. Pursue pursue pursue. But it’s about surrender to what is not in our control.

Bestselling Author and Investor James Altucher on Choosing Yourself and Stoic Minimalism

dailystoic.com

Gil Doron

59 days ago

You can be in cybersecurity and digital health. You can be in cars and software.

Israel's high-tech sector is thriving, and now China wants in on the action

cnbc.com

Gil Doron

60 days ago

Agassi’s central thesis–that people wanted to buy car service the way they buy phone service–was flawed. “Nobody loves their wireless carrier,” says a Better Place designer. “They love their iPhone.”
At the end of the meeting, Ofer asked if he could have a copy of Agassi’s white paper and then walked the two men to the elevators. As Agassi and Ofer shook hands to say goodbye, Ofer leaned in and said in a low voice that Israel Corp. was in. “Put me down for a hundred,” he said. As in, $100 million. Agassi’s charisma had carried the day.

A Broken Place: The Spectacular Failure Of The Startup That Was Going To Change The World

fastcompany.com

Gil Doron

61 days ago

Is this a barrier to entry or a condition of entry?

Winner-takes all effects in autonomous cars

ben-evans.com

Gil Doron

61 days ago

Ownership of the data is an interesting power and value chain question. Obviously Tesla plans to make all of the significant parts of the technology itself and put it in its own cars, so it owns the data as well. But some OEMs have argued that it’s their vehicle and their customer relationship, so it’s their data to own and allocate, and not for any technology partners. This looks like a reasonable position to take in regard to a sensor vendor: I’m not sure that it’s sustainable to sell commodity GPUs, cameras or LIDAR on their own and want to keep the data. But the company that makes the actual autonomous unit itself needs to have the data, because how it works. If you don’t cycle the data back into the technology it can’t improve. This means that the OEM is generating network value for a supplier without getting any of that value itself, except in the form of better autonomy, but that better autonomy becomes a commodity across all products from any OEM using it. This is the position of PC or Android OEMs: they create the network effect by agreeing to use the software in their products, and this makes it possible to sell their products, but their product has become a near-commodity with the network value going to the tech company. It's s virtuous circle where most of the value goes to the vendor, not the OEM. This is course is why most car OEMs want to make it themselves: they don’t want to end up like Compaq.

Winner-takes all effects in autonomous cars

ben-evans.com

Gil Doron

61 days ago

Ownership of the data is an interesting power and value chain question. Obviously Tesla plans to make all of the significant parts of the technology itself and put it in its own cars, so it owns the data as well. But some OEMs have argued that it’s their vehicle and their customer relationship, so it’s their data to own and allocate, and not for any technology partners. This looks like a reasonable position to take in regard to a sensor vendor: I’m not sure that it’s sustainable to sell commodity GPUs, cameras or LIDAR on their own and want to keep the data.

Winner-takes all effects in autonomous cars

ben-evans.com

Gil Doron

61 days ago

Doing this in real time on a real road remains very hard. Humans drive using vision (and sound), but extracting a sufficiently accurate 3D model of your surroundings from imaging alone (especially 2D imaging) remains an unsolved problem: machine learning makes it conceivable but no-one can do it yet with the accuracy necessary for driving. So, we take shortcuts. This is why almost all autonomy projects are combining imaging with 360 degree LIDAR: each of these sensors have their limitations, but by combining them (‘sensor fusion’) you can get a complete picture. Building a model of the world around you with imaging alone will certainly be possible at some point in the future, but using more sensors gets you there a lot quicker, even given that you have to wait for the cost and form factor of those sensors to become practical. That is, LIDAR is a shortcut to get to a model of the world around you. Once you've got that, you often use machine learning to understand what's in it - that shape is a car, or a cyclist, but for this, there don't seem to be a network effect (or a strong one): you can get enough images of cyclists yourself without needing a fleet of cars.

Winner-takes all effects in autonomous cars

ben-evans.com

Gil Doron

61 days ago

Our brains are continuously processing sensor data and building a 3D model of the world around us, in real time and quite unconsciously, such that when we run through a forest we don’t trip over a root or bang our head on a branch (mostly). In autonomy this is referred to as SLAM (Simultaneous Localisation And Mapping) - we map our surroundings and localise ourselves within them. This is obviously a basic requirement for autonomy - AVs need to work out where they are on the road and what features might be around (lanes, turnings, curbs, traffic lights etc), and they also need to work out what other vehicles are on the road and how fast they’re moving.

Winner-takes all effects in autonomous cars

ben-evans.com

Gil Doron

61 days ago

In a market that increasingly looks like it’ll have a range of suppliers seeking to offer off-the-shelf systems and components, Waymo owning its own sensor and compute tech could be a major distinguishing factor. If one member of the field is likely to stand out from the rest once autonomous driving matures, owning more of the stack is a good candidate for something that helps one solution stand out from the rest in terms of efficacy, efficiency, user experience and more.

Waymo taps Intel for self-driving computers it develops entirely in-house

techcrunch.com

Gil Doron

61 days ago

In a market that increasingly looks like it’ll have a range of suppliers seeking to offer off-the-shelf systems and components, Waymo owning its own sensor and compute tech could be a major distinguishing factor.

Waymo taps Intel for self-driving computers it develops entirely in-house

techcrunch.com

Gil Doron

61 days ago

But its in-house hardware, sensor suite and computing capability may end up being its biggest edge, since that allows it to uniquely tailor all aspects of the system for maximum effectiveness (which is what Apple does with its consumer tech gadgets).

Waymo taps Intel for self-driving computers it develops entirely in-house

techcrunch.com

Gil Doron

62 days ago

You know how sometimes you learn a new skill and you get pretty good at it, and then the next day you try again and you suck again? That’s because what made you get good at the skill the day before was adjustments to the amount or concentration of the chemicals in the signaling between neurons. Repetition caused chemicals to adjust, which helped you improve, but the next day the chemicals were back to normal so the improvement went away.

But then if you keep practicing, you eventually get good at something in a lasting way. What’s happened is you’ve told the brain, “this isn’t just something I need in a one-off way,” and the brain’s neural network has responded by making structural changes to itself that last. Neurons have shifted shape and location and strengthened or weakened various connections in a way that has built a hard-wired set of pathways that know how to do that skill.

Neurons’ ability to alter themselves chemically, structurally, and even functionally, allow your brain’s neural network to optimize itself to the external world—a phenomenon called neuroplasticity. Babies’ brains are the most neuroplastic of all. When a baby is born, its brain has no idea if it needs to accommodate the life of a medieval warrior who will need to become incredibly adept at sword-fighting, a 17th-century musician who will need to develop fine-tuned muscle memory for playing the harpsichord, or a modern-day intellectual who will need to store and organize a tremendous amount of information and master a complex social fabric—but the baby’s brain is ready to shape itself to handle whatever life has in store for it.

Neuralink and the Brain’s Magical Future

waitbutwhy.com

Gil Doron

62 days ago

An axon, the long strand of a neuron that carries information, is normally microscopic in diameter—too small for scientists to test on until recently

Neuralink and the Brain’s Magical Future

waitbutwhy.com

Gil Doron

62 days ago

First, it’s amazing that more of your brain is dedicated to the movement and feeling of your face and hands than to the rest of your body combined. This makes sense though—you need to make incredibly nuanced facial expressions and your hands need to be unbelievably dexterous, while the rest of your body—your shoulder, your knee, your back—can move and feel things much more crudely. This is why people can play the piano with their fingers but not with their toes

Neuralink and the Brain’s Magical Future

waitbutwhy.com

Gil Doron

62 days ago

The cortex is in charge of basically everything—processing what you see, hear, and feel, along with language, movement, thinking, planning, and personality.

Neuralink and the Brain’s Magical Future

waitbutwhy.com

Gil Doron

62 days ago

“If the human brain were so simple that we could understand it, we would be so simple that we couldn’t.”

Neuralink and the Brain’s Magical Future

waitbutwhy.com

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