Daniel Clarkson Fisher

MLIS student. Steph's husband. He/him/his. danielclarksonfisher.com

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Daniel Clarkson Fisher

15 hours ago

"While Ellsberg was once reviled, today he is held up as a hero. Perversely, opponents of today’s whistleblowers juxtapose their supposed bad deeds against the deeds of Ellsberg, the good whistleblower. Ellsberg has rejected those distinctions and campaigned on behalf of Chelsea Manning, Edward Snowden, and Julian Assange. Ellsberg may have helped bring down Nixon, but the Pentagon Papers were principally concerned with the lies of the Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, and Johnson administrations. Far from being the story of how one maniac accidentally found his way into the Oval Office, it is a warning about how a government willing to lie to its people to foment a war of brutal aggression abroad will not hesitate to eviscerate democracy at home." - Chip Gibbons

50 Years Ago Today, Daniel Ellsberg’s Pentagon Papers Helped End the Vietnam War

jacobinmag.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

15 hours ago

"The worst billionaires are the Good Billionaires. The sort who make it seem like the problem is the distortion of the system when, in fact, the problem is the system. Actually malevolent and disastrously negligent plutocrats get most of the attention. And when we hear about these Bad Billionaire exploits, it is possible to conclude from them that the system needs better policing, updated regulations and maybe slightly higher taxes. The system needs to be made to work again. But as America slouches toward plutocracy, our problem isn’t the virtue level of billionaires. It’s a set of social arrangements that make it possible for anyone to gain and guard and keep so much wealth, even as millions of others lack for food, work, housing, health, connectivity, education, dignity and the occasion to pursue their happiness. There is no way to be a billionaire in America without taking advantage of a system predicated on cruelty, a system whose tax code and labor laws and regulatory apparatus prioritize your needs above most people’s." - Anand Giridharadas

Warren Buffett and the Myth of the ‘Good Billionaire’

nytimes.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"Make no mistake: these attacks and intentional twisting of her words are designed not only to silence criticism of U.S. foreign policy, but to silence an outspoken woman of color. That this latest round of vilification is once again about Rep. Omar in particular is not a coincidence: the repeated targeting of Rep. Omar is rooted in sexism, racism, and anti-Muslim bigotry. It is no surprise that Rep. Omar’s opponents would seize on any opportunity to once again attack one of Congress’s leading progressive voices. The true shame is that many in her own party would buy in to such bad faith attacks. We join in solidarity with Rep. Omar and all who are willing to name the simple truth that the United States and its allies should be held accountable for their human rights violations. We urge all members of Congress, and Democratic leadership in particular, to stop falling for manufactured controversy. Fearless leadership for human rights everywhere should be commended, not condemned." - Win Without War and other signatories

Progressives Support Rep. Omar Against Bad Faith Attacks

winwithoutwar.org

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"Canadians have long called for actions like online hate regulation, the dismantling of white supremacist groups, an anti-Islamophobia lens in education, the striking down of Bill 21, street harassment bylaws and many other urgent and critical actions to tackle Islamophobia in all its forms. While some of these changes have been implemented over the years and deserve praise, the reality is that this hasn’t been enough to keep pace with the rate at which racism, white supremacy and Islamophobia are proliferating and intensifying in Canada. We need a whole-of-society approach with a coordinated effort among all levels of government." - Mustafa Farooq

The London attack demands an all-of-Canada response

thestar.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"The real reason for the war on Omar -- the need to maintain the absolute impunity of the U.S. and Israel for their actions -- is too unpalatable for those waging the war to say out loud. So all the top politicians in the U.S. were left with were ridiculous falsehoods." - Jon Schwarz

Political System Unites to Condemn Ilhan Omar for Telling the Truth

theintercept.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"The vision of history sought by those in favor of banning critical race theory or following the 1776 Commission’s precepts is one where the United States has solved all its problems and where the only issue is recalcitrant minority groups trying to change the past. Instead, we must hold on to an idea of US history that is more difficult and complicated than a rosy fairy tale. A version of the nation’s past that ignores its problems is not merely propaganda -- it is bad history." - Robert Greene II

Conservative Opponents of Critical Race Theory Are Pushing Their Own Propaganda

jacobinmag.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"Violence is happening all over the country. This year alone, there have been multiple reported assaults in Edmonton, where strangers have threatened Muslim women. In at least five cases, women were pushed, kicked and/or punched in public. Calgary has similarly witnessed numerous cases of assault against Muslims; three involved women physically attacked in broad daylight because of their hijab. Understandably, the women have been emotionally and physically traumatized. And now, a family has been killed in London. Is it any wonder why Muslims -- especially women -- don’t feel safe?" - Sheema Khan

The London attack reaffirms why Muslims often feel unsafe in their own country

theglobeandmail.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"These attacks do not emerge out of a vacuum. Rather they are deep-seated within our cultural and political norms. According to a 2017 Angus Reid poll, 46 per cent of Canadians have an unfavourable view of Islam -- more than any other religious group. These results are corroborated in a number of other studies, including those that show that 52 per cent of Canadians believe that Muslims can only be trusted 'a little' or 'not at all.' And while Canadians tend to think of themselves as far more progressive and anti-racist than their southern neighbours, that is certainly not the case when it comes to our national perception of Muslims: 47 per cent of Canadians support banning head scarves in public, compared to only 30 per cent of Americans. Additionally, 51 per cent of Canadians support government surveillance of mosques, compared to 46 per cent of Americans. Islamophobia and racism might present themselves differently in the United States as compared to Canada, but it certainly is no less deep-rooted or deadly." - Ibrahim Hindy

After the deadly anti-Muslim hate crime in London, Canadians can’t look away

thestar.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"The Democratic Party establishment is as committed to unequivocal support for Israel as their Republican counterparts. Israel’s utility to the geopolitical interests of the US government means that they will fight tooth and nail to get their ducks back into their traditional pro-Israel row. The Congressional Progressive Caucus, other members of the Squad, and grassroots organizations were right to come to Omar’s defense. It’s good to finally have a leftist on the House Foreign Affairs Committee calling out US hypocrisy and exposing war crimes, as Omar has consistently done. Neither she, nor the movement for Palestine, has anything to apologize for." - Hadas Thier

Ilhan Omar Has Absolutely Nothing to Apologize For

jacobinmag.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"Like many Muslims, when I saw the photograph of the victims in London, I saw my own family. I saw my mother’s hijab and my father’s shalwar kameez. I saw love in the eyes of the grandmother, saw hope in the eyes of the daughter, saw wonder in the eyes of the son. I saw a family that had immigrated to this country, endured hardship after hardship, raised two beautiful children -- only for their stories to be cut short. In them, I saw the best among us. Nothing can bring back this family, but in the face of this tragedy, we can confront the bigotry that poisons our society. We can address the radicalization of our fellow citizens without excusing it away. And we can look within ourselves, at the hatred that spreads among us, and begin to create a society of love and true acceptance that makes that little boy proud, hoping, in the end, that he will one day forgive us." - Omer Aziz

Islamophobia begins with ideas. It always ends in violence

theglobeandmail.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"It’s childish to pretend anti-Muslim hate exists because bad people live among us. It exists because good people view Muslims as inherently undesirable, their articles of faith as an assertion of domination, their public display of piety as a threat. It exists because these good people become bystanders and stay silent, in at least partial agreement, when Muslims are posited as outsiders, extremists and terrorists in private conversations and policy positions. It exists because such positions serve the particular geopolitics of Muslim-minority countries. In Canada, good people stayed silent when the ruling Conservatives under Stephen Harper pledged to set up a police hotline in 2015 to report what they openly called 'barbaric cultural practices,' to protect women and girls 'from forced marriage and other barbaric practices' as then immigration minister Chris Alexander called it. Anti-Muslim animosity doubled in a two-year period around this time according to Statistics Canada, but good people turned a routine non-binding motion asking the federal government to study discrimination against religions into a controversy and led protests amid faux fears that the word 'Islamophobia' would impede free speech. M-103 only passed after a white man gunned down the faithful gathered at a Quebec City mosque in 2017, and killed six Muslims. Good people stayed silent when Quebec took another run at niqab-wearing Muslim women and enacted a religious symbols ban for government workers in 2019, in the name of secularism. Good people stay silent when friends say things like, 'Don’t sell your house to a Muslim.' Good people who worry about losing friends should consider just how rampant Islamophobia is that it stops them from standing up for Muslims. It’s easy to feel sorry for people at the receiving end of a random act of violence. Easy to weep, to change social media profiles and to amplify the right hashtags. But when it comes to speaking up against the systemic injustice that allows for this to happen, perhaps all good people should consider just how they define 'good.'" - Shree Paradkar

Anti-Muslim hate exists not because of bad people, but because good people view Muslims as undesirable

thestar.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"What the 2017 Quebec mosque shooting, the 2020 stabbing death of a Toronto mosque caretaker and numerous other instances of hate crimes make clear is that Canada is far from immune to hateful speech and extremist violence. The attack on the Muslim family in London, Ont., may prove to be yet another instance of this worrying development. Our research demonstrates how social media platforms are an important incubator of hateful communities. Finding ways to bring these platforms to account and limit hateful and extremist content online is essential to keeping marginalized and minority communities safe." - Amarnath Amarasingam and Jacob Davey

Canada’s online ecosystem of hate is thriving

theglobeandmail.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"The supposedly offensive tweet from Omar began with the following words: 'We must have the same level of accountability and justice for all victims of crimes against humanity.' Few people are willing to state their opposition to this principle, but if the Beltway foreign-policy establishment had to apply it consistently, it would cut through their most cherished assumptions and alliances. They’ll fight like hell to stop that from happening, with slogans like 'moral equivalence' inscribed on their banner." - Daniel Finn

Ilhan Omar’s Critics Want Impunity for US and Israeli War Crimes

jacobinmag.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"The essence of horror isn’t grotesquerie or gore but the sense of a world in dysfunction, which is what gives the genre its political spark, as its crucial modern master, George A. Romero, showed from the start. In his recently recovered and restored featurette THE AMUSEMENT PARK, from 1973, he sticks close to real-world scenarios and practicalities, but the results are no less cosmically horrific than those in his tales of supernatural impossibilities. The movie, which was previously unreleased (it was restored by IndieCollect and is now streaming on Shudder), was commissioned by the Lutheran Service Society to dramatize the troubles faced by elderly Americans. The finished product, written by Walton Cook and directed by Romero, shocked the group, which shelved the film. Romero did his job too well." - Richard Brody

A Rediscovered Featurette from the Modern Master of Horror

www-newyorker-com.cdn.ampproject.org

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"Symbols are important, especially for those who don’t find them merely symbolic. But the toppling and the renaming has to be accompanied by concrete action. The calls to action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls report must finally be fully implemented. The federal government could stop its costly litigation against survivors and Indigenous children. (Justin Trudeau and his cabinet this week refused to vote on a non-binding motion in Parliament to do exactly that.) Words can be as hollow as those statues, or they can carry the weight of action. So can a name. I hope by this time next year, my old school will be sending me fundraising letters under a different one." - Elizabeth Renzetti

Say goodbye to Ryerson’s statue – and his name, too

theglobeandmail.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

1 day ago

"Why have wages stagnated during the past four decades? The EPI’s Bivens and Lawrence Mishel argued last month that the blame rests with high interest rates, proliferating trade deals, ever-more-brazen wage theft (i.e., employers’ failure to pay minimum wage or overtime), an eroding legal minimum wage, diminishing legal overtime eligibility, judicial decisions restricting the ability of workers to sue their employers, deregulation, privatization, economic concentration, a fissuring workforce (meaning a trend toward outsourcing labor within the U.S. to smaller, less scrupulous companies), and declining union power. These were policies consciously pursued by government at all levels at the behest of the business lobby. I’m inclined to believe that the decline of union power -- that is, the shrinking proportion of private-sector workers who belong to unions amid steep government barriers to union organizing -- is the linchpin. Ultimately, it all comes down to the exercise of power, and workers just don’t have any. That won’t change until the labor movement is rebuilt. The House-passed Protecting the Right to Organize Act would be a good start, but nobody expects it to pass anytime soon. It is therefore a childish fantasy to presume the American worker is gaining any real leverage over employers. Management has little to fear." - Timothy Noah

We Regret to Inform You That Workers Are Not Suddenly Winning

newrepublic.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

2 days ago

"In April, Human Rights Watch released a 213-page report that documented Israeli authorities committing 'crimes against humanity of apartheid and persecution.' Leading Israeli human rights group B’tselem characterized the region as governed by a regime of ethnic supremacy. These terms -- apartheid, persecution, ethnic supremacy -- are increasingly gaining institutional recognition after years of Palestinian advocacy, and we, as journalists, need to examine whether our coverage reflects that reality." - the signatories of "An Open Letter on U.S. Media Coverage of Palestine"

An open letter on U.S. media coverage of Palestine

medialetterpalestine.medium.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

2 days ago

"Žižek is a mercurial figure whose work can be bafflingly spasmodic. His propensity to adopt the most provocative position has led him to conclude French voters have no reason to prefer the neoliberal Emmanuel Macron over the xenophobic Marine Le Pen. His writing vacillates between enjoyably accessible, with plenty of pop culture references to brighten things up, and frustratingly dense. And even sympathetic readers sometimes wish he would quit repeating himself throughout his myriad writings. But these faults shouldn’t obscure the value of Žižek’s work on dialectical materialism and ideology. Few left-wing theorists have been as effective in refocusing our attention on the dynamics of neoliberal capitalism and the increasingly mysterious ways its ideology surfaces in everyday life. Likewise, while his leftist opponents have often taken issue with his exhumation of dialectical materialism, accusing it of being pre-scientific, they could perhaps learn something from it. Žižek’s dialectics of incompleteness show us how novelty in politics, as in science, is possible -- how Lenin could emerge from the periphery to seize power in the Russian Revolution, to cite one of his favorite examples. The views of his left opponent often seem more primitive and binary. There is inequality, they tell us, so we should redistribute wealth. What this elides is the need to radically upend a system that, at present, makes fulfilling this goal nearly impossible. If the mission of critical theory is to analyze and critique the ailments of its time, then Žižek is one of our finest diagnosticians. His work may not be sublime, but it is revelatory -- which is just what the Left needs right now." - Conrad Hamilton

In Defense of Slavoj Žižek

jacobinmag.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

4 days ago

"When a public intellectual declines this far, we need to ask: Was she always full of shit?" - Liza Featherstone

The Madness of Naomi Wolf

newrepublic.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

5 days ago

"For years, Canada, its politicians and media refused to look at the past and acknowledge the genocide conducted against its Indigenous people. They chose to look away. Today, despite evidence upon evidence of Islamophobia, some still want to convince themselves and their children that we are a 'good' country. Well, sorry to say, we are a country inherently built on injustice. We have a history of racism and a present still full of racism toward many communities. The least we can do today is acknowledge the harm and slowly work together to heal the wound and avoid more tragedies in the future." - Monia Mazigh

Canada is still in denial about Islamophobia

rabble.ca

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

5 days ago

"We stand at a curious cultural and political juncture when it comes to Palestine. Although AOC has previously been accused of pandering to the Israel lobby, she also introduced a resolution with fellow Democrats Mark Pocan and Rashida Tlaib that calls for the discontinuation of arms sales to Israel. Additionally, Senator Bernie Sanders recently introduced a resolution to block $735 million dollars in U.S. arms sales to Israel (though he soon withdrew it). With every bomb the Israeli army drops on Gaza, the stakes are becoming clearer -- and so is the cowardice of those who claim that choosing a side is simply too difficult. Being neutral is not only a refusal to say anything for fear of losing status or alienating supporters; it’s also engaging in platitudes that are focused on reorienting attention away from Israeli repression and toward vague, nebulous statements against 'hate' or 'violence.' While Sanders has been one of many high-profile voices condemning Israeli aggression, he still has not crossed over the Sartrean boundary. Calling for an 'even-handed approach' to the conflict and asking progressives to 'tone down the rhetoric' about Israeli apartheid, Sanders’ peculiar brand of realpolitik illustrates the tedious mental gymnastics required to avoid taking an uncomfortable, honest stance on Palestine that could alienate friends and family (or, in a politician’s case, allies and donors) in the process. Sartre, like Sanders, built his reputation by making bold and courageous arguments on behalf of the powerless. The principles they advanced -- which are shared by contemporary progressives -- are noble ones. But those principles need to be applied consistently to have any real meaning. Sartre’s distinct ethical dilemma stemmed from his fear of crossing the line of neutrality and trying to straddle the center of two conflicting sides -- but the straddling of this line is indefensible when lives are at stake. A person of the 'progressive except for Palestine' persuasion who is too afraid to cross this Sartrean line has little of value to say on the politics of liberation today." - Ruqaiyah Zarook

Jean-Paul Sartre and the Problem of Being “Progressive Except for Palestine” ❧ Current Affairs

currentaffairs.org

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

5 days ago

"Ultimately, the show doesn’t provide us with well-written and multifaceted Black characters or adequately complex storylines. Instead, BRIDGERTON is yet another iteration of colorist, colorblind, multiracial theater. It obfuscates the legacies of colonialism and enslavement, and does so by reducing the dismantling of white supremacy to the success of interracial relationships. There’s really nothing promising about that." - Corrine Collins

The Broken Promises of “Bridgerton”

publicbooks.org

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

5 days ago

"During her recent visit to Guatemala, Vice President Kamala Harris delivered a frank message to Central Americans hoping to find refuge in the United States. 'I want to be clear to folks in this region who are thinking about making that dangerous trek to the United States-Mexico border,' she said at a press conference with Guatemalan President Alejandro Giammattei on June 7. 'Do not come. Do not come. The United States will continue to enforce our laws and secure our border.' Harris’s comments drew criticism from organizations advocating for asylum seekers. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D‑N.Y.) wrote on Twitter that seeking asylum at the U.S. border is '100% legal' and called on the United States to 'finally acknowledge its contributions to destabilization and régime change in the region.'" - The Editors of In These Times

Let's Not Forget the Suffering the U.S. Has Inflicted on Guatemala

inthesetimes.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

5 days ago

"The seizure of our phone records may turn out to be a boon for journalists, however. The Justice Department announced last weekend, after two days of criticism over the seizure of our phone records, that it would no longer use subpoenas or other legal tools to obtain information about journalists’ sources. It was a major turnabout for the Biden administration, and if it holds, it’s a major boost for press freedom and the ability of journalists to get information out to the public. I just wish that had been the policy all along." - Eric Lichtblau

Trump’s DOJ Was Wrong to Seize My Phone Records

theintercept.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

7 days ago

"In [an] essay [for World Records Journal], [filmmaker Brett] Story argues that 'story' is only as natural as capitalism. It’s easier to sell a neat, narrativised nugget of information -- but to become reliant on story as an organising principle is to lose something unique to the documentary form. 'To centre an individual and their story is also to centre, in our cinema, empathy over solidarity,' she writes. In other words, we praise the rhetoric of story for its supposed universality, but the ability to map our experiences on to another person’s life is no radical act in and of itself." - Simran Hans

Less storytelling, please: why documentaries will benefit from getting real

theguardian.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

7 days ago

"As Kimberly Frum, a spokesperson for the Postal Service, puts it in an email to The Progressive: 'Our business and operating models are unsustainable and out of step with the changing needs of the nation and our customers. Years of chronic underinvestment in our infrastructure and network have taken its toll on our performance and workforce. Our problems are serious but solvable.' She’s right: All of the Postal Service’s problems can be fixed. Relative to, say, managing a pandemic that a huge share of the population refuses to take seriously, it should be a cinch." - Bill Lueders

Saving the Postal Service

progressive.org

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

7 days ago

"Thought leadership represents the neoliberalization or corporatization of intellectual life, but it does, in principle, still maintain the pretense of shaping a conversation occurring in a public space -- the way intellectual authority has been wielded and weighed really since the Enlightenment. With DOOM, even that veneer has been stripped away. In this light, its oddest and most irritating qualities make more sense. The chortling disdain for socialists and climate activists, the repetition and recycling, the mystifying detours and digressions (including several pages spent patiently debunking the historical theories of a hedge-fund billionaire named Ray Dalio) -- all these things turn out to be features rather than bugs, in a work meant to cajole and convince an exalted few. We have left the world of John Stuart Mill and Adam Smith and are back with Machiavelli. Here, ideas and authors matter for whispering in the king’s ear. Finding or convincing a democratic public is not necessary." - Ian Beacock

Who Will Read Niall Ferguson’s Doom?

newrepublic.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

8 days ago

"The DC Labor Film Festival continues to be an entry point for moviegoers to think about labor as central to the fabric of the American experience, and consider workers in America not as individuals struggling alone but a class that can become powerful." - Soham Gadre

Showcasing the Best of Working-Class Cinema

jacobinmag.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

9 days ago

"If the Biden administration is serious about being more transparent, it can at least start by doing more about the recently disclosed Trump-era seizures of journalists’ records than merely casting a critical eye in his predecessor’s direction and making a wan promise to clear the lowest possible bar. We need to know, as Times editor Dean Baquet said in a statement, 'Why this action was taken and what steps are being taken to make certain it does not happen again in the future.' Only by making specific commitments to remedy these breaches of trust can Biden send a message to the rest of his administration that a higher standard has been set." - Alex Shepard

Trump’s War on the Press Isn’t Over Until Biden Ends It

newrepublic.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

10 days ago

"Conservative coldness toward anti-Biden books is good news for Biden, but spells bad news for progressives. Biden was peddled to progressive Democrats during the general election as 'the most progressive candidate in history,' but the fact that conservative publishers can’t find any policies at which to take offense and balloon into a book indicates that Biden is not, in fact, very progressive. It’s not particularly surprising that conservatives are finding the man who authored the 1994 crime bill, undermined Anita Hill when chairing the 1991 Clarence Thomas hearings, assured wealthy donors that 'nothing would fundamentally change' under his presidency, and regularly states his desire to reach across the aisle and work with conservatives difficult to villainize from a conservative perspective -- but for voters who were sold the idea of Biden swinging left, it’s a sad sign that it was just lip service." - Walker Caplan

Conservatives don’t want anti-Biden books. Should liberals be concerned?

lithub.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

10 days ago

"Ultimately, American interests are not well served by existing geopolitical partnerships, a sprawling archipelago of military bases, and the ongoing pursuit of armed supremacy. But to revise the core tenets of American primacy will require Democratic transformations akin to what we have begun to see on the domestic front. Unless new thinkers are brought into the party’s foreign policy establishment, Biden and his successors will inevitably peddle a twentieth-century model of U.S. leadership -- one increasingly at odds with the base and ill-suited to the global challenges of the twenty-first century." - Aslı Bâli and Aziz Rana

Biden’s Foreign Policy Doctrine Is Stuck in the Twentieth Century

newrepublic.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

10 days ago

"Companies did just fine for decades marketing to consumers without access to their every movement or keyboard and mouse click. And with 94 percent of Americans saying they liked it that way, it’s time for advertisers to listen." - Greg Bensinger

Americans Actually Want Privacy. Shocking.

nytimes.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

10 days ago

"Air war accomplishes one thing: the destruction of civilian landscapes and the murder of noncombatants. It may accomplish other military goals in the process, but the wanton destruction of innocent life is its purpose and its innovation. Books like THE BOMBER MAFIA that discuss the varieties of air war and the various merits of different approaches obscure this fact under irrelevant technological distraction. Gladwell’s thesis -- that LeMay’s destructive impulse was right even though the U.S. now wins wars with Hansell’s moral tactics -- is muddled because the distinction he’s groping for is incoherent. For anyone who takes even the slightest unblinkered look at how much hell and death airpower has brought to the civilians in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the world over, the only answer to Gladwell’s central question -- area bombing or precision bombing? -- can be, What’s the difference?" - Colin Dickey

Malcolm Gladwell’s Fantasy of War From the Air

newrepublic.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

10 days ago

"Bezos likely sees himself as the protagonist in his own heroic journey. For all his grand vision, however, his company’s size feels almost accidental -- a symptom of a broken American regulatory state and an economy’s mania for acquisition. We’re not in Kansas anymore, Toto, and we’re likely never going back. MGM sold off Dorothy’s ruby red slippers in 1970." - Jacob Bacharach

Bezos the Great and Powerful

inthesetimes.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

10 days ago

"Despite signing executive orders meant to mandate a 'government-wide approach to combat the climate crisis,' the administration is fighting environmental groups to keep alive a controversial Trump-era Alaskan drilling project set to produce one hundred thousand barrels of oil a day for thirty years, rendering Biden’s climate goals irrelevant. For all the praise his early cancellation of the Keystone Pipeline received -- which, instead of a bold new step, simply rewound Trump policy back to the status quo when Obama left office -- in office, he’s firmly behind keeping the similar Dakota Access Pipeline flowing. And he’s already made a mockery of his own lease moratorium, issuing dozens of leases on federal lands in May that had been sold off by Trump in his final weeks as president. Report after report after report has warned that if climate change and overexploitation of natural resources aren’t urgently checked -- not some, half, or most of the way, but all of the way -- there is a good chance our civilizations will begin to unravel in our lifetimes, as civilizations have tended to do throughout history when put under extreme environmental pressures. Ours might be the first to actually have the knowledge, technology, wealth, and foresight to avoid this grim outcome. And yet the Biden administration -- potentially this decade’s last chance for the United States to take action on the issue, given political realities -- is not really even trying." - Branko Marcetic

Joe Biden Is Almost as Pro-Drilling as Trump

jacobinmag.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"I think there is an increasing danger of novels becoming too streamlined, domesticated. When you read Vasily Grossman or the big Russian novels, they are wild and unwieldy, but now there’s a way in which literature is being commodified and packaged -- is it romance, is it a thriller? Commercial? Literary? What shelf should we put it on? And now we have the phenomenon of the M.F.A. novel, which can often be a beautifully confected product. There are no rough edges. The number of characters, the length of chapters, it’s all skillfully orchestrated -- and I’ll say that male novelists are allowed leeway there. They’re more easily allowed the big canvas. But with a woman, it’s like, How many characters are there in that book? Isn’t it a bit too *political*? I’d ask them, How many characters are there in ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE or WAR AND PEACE or whatever? I sometimes feel that the settled classes, the contemporary cultural czars who are the arbiters of taste in the arts and in literature, are often wary of the real, deep, unsettling politics that are not part of accepted pedagogy -- we are expected to write within a sort of default worldview, in which the ideas of what constitutes progress, enlightenment, and civilization are agreed upon. But I think that is changing now. It’s being challenged by young writers and poets, challenged from many directions, from across the world." - Arundhati Roy

The Art of Fiction No. 249

theparisreview.org

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"I like to envision a version of HOW I BUILT THIS that unravels the solitary hero’s journey, surfacing the public externalities and stakeholders swept up in any private venture. But the program is not built to be educational, or interrogative. It is quasi-sponsored entertainment, not unlike the TV franchises SHARK TANK and UNDERCOVER BOSS: a well-oiled PR machine that exalts successful CEOs as society’s primary success stories worthy of emulation. The show captures carefully curated moments of vulnerability, always tinged with the assurance of a happy ending (otherwise you wouldn’t be hearing about it). It portrays even the most dumb-luck, jackpot-winning founder as an oracle whose ideas deserve to be taken seriously, no matter how far outside their area of expertise they stray. Worst of all, HOW I BUILT THIS perpetuates the devaluation of our most essential workers and flatters our shallowest acquisitive impulses, placating an increasingly indignant yet inert public with an old tune -- that as long as there are copious new goods and services to occupy our days, we must be part of a grand adventure headed somewhere exciting." - Matthew King

Late-Stage Fairytales

thebaffler.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"However perfectly or imperfectly Osaka may have handled one transaction with the French Open, it’s a rare twenty-three-year-old who is this lucid about who is on their side and who is not, and who knows the value of privacy and interiority. Osaka seems to have made the calculation that giving up some essential part of herself to tournament organizers and the press pool is a losing proposition. They could never repay her enough for such a sacrifice, even if they wanted to. We could all learn a thing or two from that." - Miya Tokumitsu

Naomi Osaka Was Right to Stand Up to the Tennis Bosses

jacobinmag.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"The real world has to be very carefully done. You have to stitch together the fantasy and horror with very fine stitches so that the person who watches or reads the book says, these are real people and I understand their problems. Then you say, I’m going to put these people you know and understand in a different situation that’s probably unreal." - Stephen King

Stephen King on Why ‘Lisey’s Story’ Was One He Had to Adapt Himself

nytimes.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"'I refuse to give up this platform to promote complacency and peace, when there is a war on my body and a war on my rights,' Smith said in her speech. 'A war on the rights of your sisters, a war on the rights of your mothers, a war on the rights of your daughters. We cannot stay silent.'" - Julia Conley

High School Valedictorian Blasts Texas’ Anti-Choice Law in Graduation Speech

truthout.org

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"Ellsberg’s leak of the Pentagon Papers helped end the Vietnam War. Since then, he’s devoted decades of activism to raising awareness of the danger of nuclear weapons, helping us understand people like Power, the systems in which they thrive, and how humans are absolutely capable of deluding ourselves into extinction. The 1958 study and his attempt to face down the Espionage Act are significant additions to his work, and everyone who’d like human civilization to continue should pay attention." - Jon Schwarz

Why Daniel Ellsberg Wants the U.S. to Prosecute Him Under the Espionage Act

theintercept.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"There is a century-plus long history of tennis treating its women players like second class citizens. For the few women of color that have ascended the ranks, the treatment has been even worse. Their response is about disciplining Osaka. This isn’t about press conferences. It’s about taking the player who used what in their minds is their platform to go off script and punishing her for it. This is what a backlash to activist athletes looks like: a generalized mood among white fans combining with conservative owners to send a message that 2020 is over and old hierarchies must return. No matter how messy, they want the wine back in the bottle just as sure as those jerseys and helmets with political slogans are back with the mothballs. Players, their unions, and allies need to wake up and start to devise a strategy for how they are going to respond, or they will lose all of the hard-fought and historic gains of the past year: a time when athletes took the politics of this nation from the movement for Black lives to the 2020 elections and rocked their core. We all had better watch their backs because elephants never forget." - Dave Zirin

Naomi Osaka and the Growing Backlash Against Athletes Who Dare to Speak Out

thenation.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"The White House’s goal should be a simple one -- to 'do as much as possible, as quickly as possible.' There are countless combinations of public messaging, backroom dealmaking, and policy enactment that could achieve that objective, and not all of them involve playing the doomsday, man-on-the-corner bit. But the window for this administration to oversee lasting, impactful legislation and policy is rapidly closing. The 2022 midterms are storming closer with every minute that ticks off the clock, and the ability to call on Joe Manchin to tip the Senate over the edge in close votes will very likely be rendered moot on the other side of that election. If, in order to quickly transition away from fossil fuels, the team needs to twist arms, make Americans a little uncomfortable, and stir up the ire of the Fox News crowd, then so be it." - Nick Martin

The Biden White House Is Strangely Calm About Our Burning Planet

newrepublic.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"As a law professor and a Pentagon foreign policy official during the Obama years, [Rosa] Brooks is a member of the same carceral system as the police. As such, her concluding statements [in TANGLED UP IN BLUE] are rooted in a coziness with the institutions she is supposedly critiquing." - Katie Way

The Misplaced Hope of Understanding Police From the Inside

thenation.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"In truth, there is nothing extraordinary about suspending TRIPS to address what the WTO’s director-general calls 'the moral and economic issue of our time.' There can’t be, because there is nothing extraordinary about TRIPS itself. Its backstory is almost impossibly shallow and grubby; its founding documents younger than Justin Bieber. TRIPS is not the expression of a universal post–Cold War consensus, in the way the U.N. Declaration on Human Rights gave voice to human aspirations after World War II. It was born as a brute and profoundly undemocratic expression of concentrated corporate power -- the work of 'less than 50 individuals,' according to a U.S. trade official present at the creation. One of that official’s reluctant Indian counterparts, Prabhat Patnaik, has described the TRIPS affair as 'a parody of the wildest conspiracy theory.' The negotiations that led to the creation of TRIPS were less held over a table than conducted on a rack. It was the only way to enforce the peculiar and nearly universally rejected concept of medical monopoly, an American innovation that cut hard against centuries of moral, economic, and legal tradition, including those of the wider West." - Alexander Zaitchik

Long, Strange TRIPS: The Grubby History of How Vaccines Became Intellectual Property

newrepublic.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"People are beginning to question whether the private market is the most efficient way of organizing the production and distribution of basic necessities, such as education, healthcare, and housing. The recent proposals from Washington, D.C., signal a renewed openness to public intervention. Even if the pandemic has not brought the 'end of our romance with market society and hyper-individualism,' as sociologist Eric Klinenberg writes, it is clear that the romance has at least soured. The time to act is now. The question is whether we will use this opportunity to redress more than a century of wrongs and the fundamental problems in our housing provision, or if we will continue to expand institutions that we know have failed to meet the needs of our communities." - Gianpaolo Baiocchi and H. Jacob Carlson

Housing Is a Social Good

bostonreview.net

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"In collaboration with the visual investigations team SITU, The Intercept reconstructed the events of [June 2, 2020, in Charlotte, NC] by mapping footage captured by witnesses and police cameras against a 3D digital model of the urban environment in which the incident unfolded. The reconstruction, which offers multiple perspectives of the same event, shows that police deliberately exposed hundreds of peaceful protesters to tear gas and other 'less-than-lethal' weapons within a confined space they had no clear way to escape. The model, combined with officers’ comments caught by their own body cameras, shows that their maneuvers had been intentional and carefully coordinated despite a claim from Charlotte’s then-police chief that his officers had not intended to cause harm. The Charlotte incident is a particularly brutal example of a tactic police across the country have deployed for years against protesters -- and at least a dozen times since last summer’s uprising alone. Known to protesters and civil rights advocates as 'kettling,' the crowd control strategy consists of police surrounding a group of people, ostensibly in order to isolate them from a larger crowd for the purpose of making arrests. In practice, the maneuver -- which police have described as 'corralling,' 'containment,' or 'encirclement' -- traps people in the streets with no immediate way out, indiscriminately subjecting all to the same, oftentimes violent treatment regardless of individual conduct." - Alice Speri

Ambushed by the Cops: When Police Deliberately Trap Peaceful Protesters

theintercept.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"'I sacrificed so many things to create this. It has a special place for me,' Mansour said. 'Our solution is to restore things to what they were.'" - Nabih Bulos

He watched two missiles destroy his bookshop. ‘My soul came out of me’

latimes.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

11 days ago

"Even Matthews’s appeals to history qua history are correspondingly punditized, and miniaturized for seeming televisual consumption. As he winds up this career-driven tour of his life and times, Matthews hurriedly invokes the wisdom of a host of modern presidential elders. On a single page, he has JFK both intoning his inaugural plea to ;ask what you can do for your country' and invoking his rhetorical Berlin citizenship in the wake of the Berlin Wall’s erection; Ronald Reagan delivering his patriotic address to the nation after the Challenger space shuttle crash; President George W. Bush shouting his bullhorn exhortations to the workers at Ground Zero after the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center; Teddy Roosevelt cheerfully characterizing the presidency as a bully pulpit; and Abraham Lincoln pledging, in his second inaugural, to 'bind up the nation’s wounds' and to act 'with malice toward none, and with charity toward all.' For good measure, Matthews even throws in some dialogue from the Aaron Sorkin–scripted presidential rom-com DAVE, the precursor to Sorkin’s dreadful primetime workplace drama about the American presidency, THE WEST WING. It’s a classic Chris Matthews performance, rendered on the printed page -- a blizzard of deeply clichéd, executive-sanctioned sentiment about everything and nothing. It begins as a gloss on FDR’s (also exhaustively quoted) pronouncement that the attack on Pearl Harbor marked a 'date which will live in infamy' and the president’s forecast that the United States would prevail in the global struggle ahead. Yet that’s exactly what presidents are supposed to say in such moments; it’s all too easy to unearth nearly identical sentiments from, say, James Polk’s dishonest conduct of the Mexican War, Lyndon Johnson’s dead-end commitment to the debacle of the Vietnam War, or George W. Bush’s mendacious cheerleading campaign for the moral catastrophe of the second American invasion of Iraq. Matthews’s citations of other presidential utterances here seem mostly to serve as totemic reminders that, throughout our history, presidents have said things that are presidential. To live through, and reflect on, history in any meaningful way is to wrestle with the tragic limits it imposes on the ambitions of the powerful, hubristic class of men and women who claim to know its foreordained course -- what the historian John Lukacs called the interpretation of history as 'chastened thought.' But that’s not something that Chris Matthews or his legions of cable imitators are about to blurt out on set. And that, in turn, leaves his long-suffering audience to marvel at the very many types of leaders who are, in fact, getting away with anything and everything -- and to exclaim, yet again, in bitter wonderment, 'What a country.'" - Chris Lehmann

What Chris Matthews Learned in Washington

newrepublic.com

Daniel Clarkson Fisher

14 days ago

"The booth invites comparisons to all kinds of science-fiction dystopia and it’s tempting to indulge the impulse. Dystopias, however, are worlds that do not exist. Amazon is real, and so are its working conditions. A person who looks at the booth and says, 'This is so BLACK MIRROR,' really means to say that they are frightened. Something has gone terribly wrong, in a way that can feel final. It can be difficult to admit that this is simply how we live now. Amazon can crush unions and work its employees to exhaustion, and still carry on as normal. The ZenBooth is not proof that Amazon has become kinder, or more employee-conscious. It is evidence of something else altogether: Amazon will not listen to workers at all." - Sarah Jones

Even a Dystopia Would Wince at Amazon’s ‘Zen Booth’

nymag.com

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