Andy Brett

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Andy Brett

1 day ago

He stayed on the air mattress. "The word I keep coming back to is 'adaptable,'" Kim says, remembering a story about Andrew's childhood. "I worked every other weekend, and my husband and his friend David would load him in the back of the car and go riding on the hunting property [in Gainesville], and Andrew would just go along with it. My sister-in-law said we weren't real parents because 
Andrew was too easy."

How Indians reliever Andrew Miller will end the tyranny of the save

espn.com

Andy Brett

1 day ago

Cities should stop trying to increase the supply of parking and rigging the market in favour of homeowners. Instead, they should raise prices until the streets and the car parks are nearly, but not quite, full—and charge everybody.

The perilous politics of parking

economist.com

Andy Brett

1 day ago

Chile's solar capacity goes to 11, in other words 🎸

Outside the plant’s operations center, a worker-safety chart rated the day’s ultraviolet radiation levels on a scale of one to 10. “Eleven,” it read. “Extreme.”

While Trump promotes coal, other countries are turning to cheap sun power

washingtonpost.com

Andy Brett

1 day ago

On the surface, it appears to be another work of guerrilla art — but it’s not.

gregfallis.com

Andy Brett

1 day ago

JPMorgan started looking into preapproving sites, a strategy known as whitelisting, this month after The New York Times showed it an ad for Chase’s private client services on a site called Hillary 4 Prison. It was under a headline claiming that the actor Elijah Wood had revealed “the horrifying truth about the Satanic liberal perverts who run Hollywood.”

Chase Had Ads on 400,000 Sites. Then on Just 5,000. Same Results.

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

1 day ago

“He seemed like he was just an easygoing coach,” Lindor says, “that was always chewing gum and making the right decisions.”

The Great Communicator

theringer.com

Andy Brett

1 day ago

I'm really glad there are people who aren't content to just run out the clock on their lives and then fade into historical oblivion, as this piece argues is the more ethical path.

Even if I had the talent to do these sorts of things (obviously I don’t), I think the wiser and more ethical path is a family, a career, a home, and then historical oblivion.

Neuralink is horrifying

tomlee.wtf

Andy Brett

2 days ago

There's no way to pick out one quote from these 38,000 words but it's a pretty mind-blowing piece. Need to read it a couple more times.

Neuralink and the Brain’s Magical Future

waitbutwhy.com

Andy Brett

4 days ago

As I thumbed toward the top of the screen, I had the disconcerting sense of watching a life become a life-style brand.

#Vanlife, the Bohemian Social-Media Movement

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

4 days ago

As I thumbed toward the top of the screen, I had the disconcerting sense of watching a life become a life-style brand.

#Vanlife, the Bohemian Social-Media Movement

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

7 days ago

The Blue Corner wasn't alone. Another group started a Red Corner on the other side of the canvas. Their users claimed a leftist political leaning. Yet another started the Green Lattice, which went for a polka-dot design with interspersing green pixels and white. They championed their superior efficiency, since they only had to color half as many pixels as the other Factions.

When Pixels Collide

sudoscript.com

Andy Brett

17 days ago

Sonobe is 20 minutes from my current "home" - coincidence? Not really, I think.

Mr Miyamoto wanted you to get lost. The propulsive, unidirectional energy of “Super Mario Bros” was a holdover from the era of coin-gobbling video-game arcades. By contrast, “The Legend of Zelda” rewarded stoic perseverance, frequently leaving the player puzzling over what to do next. The aspirations of “The Legend of Zelda” had less in common with the feverish spirit of the arcades than of J.R.R. Tolkien.

The inspiration for this style of gameplay was Mr Miyamoto’s own childhood memories from the countryside of Sonobe, Japan: combing rice fields, scaling hillsides, fishing lakes. One foundational experience he had as a child was stumbling upon a cave, which he eventually mustered the courage to enter by the light of a homemade lantern “The game is not for children,” he would later say, “it is for me.” Link, like Mr Miyamoto, is left-handed.

How Nintendo told gamers to get lost

economist.com

Andy Brett

21 days ago

It is such an integral part of Japanese transportation that direction boards at the Kyoto Rail Museum even feature characters in the classic point-and-call stance.

Why Japan’s Rail Workers Can’t Stop Pointing at Things

atlasobscura.com

Andy Brett

21 days ago

One must imagine Sisyphus happy

Is it worth the trouble?

medium.com

Andy Brett

23 days ago

“See these stairs and lead up to that door?” Nohara asked me before leading me up a random flight of stairs to a mysterious door with nothing on it. “That is a restaurant.”

He then opened the door to show me a fully functional restaurant equipped with an open kitchen. There’s nothing outside the building that gives off even the slightest clue that food is served there.

Meet the Man Who Charges $780 a Day to Reveal Japan’s Hidden Secrets

nextshark.com

Andy Brett

32 days ago

How Should We Then Live?

thearchdruidreport.blogspot.com

Andy Brett

33 days ago

What I Heard From Trump Supporters

blog.samaltman.com

Andy Brett

33 days ago

"Solmorrow is a longer day", as the Book of Mormon says

Welcome To Mars! Enjoy Perpetual Jet Lag Under An Eerie Red Sky

fivethirtyeight.com

Andy Brett

35 days ago

A local eatery near me whose interior design invokes the 1930s features a bathroom with a white steel crank-roll paper towel dispenser. When spun on its ungeared mechanism, an analogous, glorious measure of towel appears directly and immediately, as if sent from heaven.

Rolling out a proper portion of towel feels remarkable largely because that victory also seems so rare, even despite constant celebrations of technological accomplishment. The frequency with which technology works precariously has been obscured by culture’s obsession with technological progress, its religious belief in computation, and its confidence in the mastery of design. In truth, hardly anything works very well anymore.

Why Nothing Works Anymore

theatlantic.com

Andy Brett

37 days ago

Stand back, however, and the implications are far more substantial than this. One can just about spot the vision of a distant, near-workless future in the habits of young gamers. If good things in life can be had for very little money, then working hard to have more than very little money looks less attractive. The history of the industrial era has been one in which technology has reduced the proportion of income devoted to necessities like food while providing vast new possibilities for consumption. As this happened, the hours worked by the typical person declined.

Escape to another world

1843magazine.com

Andy Brett

38 days ago

In the last few years, and with greater intensity in the last 12 months, people started paying for online content. They are doing so at an accelerating pace, and on a dependable, recurring schedule, often through subscriptions. And they’re paying for everything.

How the Internet Is Saving Culture, Not Killing It

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

46 days ago

This borderlessness, or, if you prefer, confusion, is also crucial to what we consider progress. As people invented new tools for new ways of living, they simultaneously created new realms of ignorance; if everyone had insisted on, say, mastering the principles of metalworking before picking up a knife, the Bronze Age wouldn’t have amounted to much. When it comes to new technologies, incomplete understanding is empowering.

Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

48 days ago

The SDF remains one of the world’s odder armies. It has never fired a shot in battle. Its main role, for many Japanese, is disaster relief. Yet it has a larger navy than France and Britain combined, including four huge “helicopter carriers”.

Japan’s government tries to free its soldiers from pacifist shackles

economist.com

Andy Brett

48 days ago

The marketing worked. In 1939, 10% of American brides received a diamond engagement ring. By the end of the century 80% did. The result was a unique industry, controlled by a single company that was both marketer and miner, a capital-intensive business built on an ephemeral link to love, its success due to strangled supply and inflated demand.

A report from De Beers’s new diamond mine

economist.com

Andy Brett

48 days ago

Foursquare likes to show off its data-crunching prowess with predictions. It forecast the sales figures for the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, for instance, and the decline in revenue, almost to the burrito bowl, for Chipotle following the E. coli mess. The company currently derives ninety per cent of its revenue from allowing a variety of businesses to use not just its A.P.I. but its data, too.

The Not-So-Surprising Survival of Foursquare

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

53 days ago

The Future of Not Working

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

53 days ago

“When I die and go to hell,” he wrote, “the devil is going to make me the marketing director for a cola company. I’ll be in charge of trying to sell a product that no one needs, is identical to its competitors and can’t be sold on its merits.”

Why Patagonia's off-the-wall advertising asks customers to think twice before buying its products

thedrum.com

Andy Brett

60 days ago

Most significant, the week after Trump signed his now unravelling travel ban, the Museum of Modern Art replaced seven works in its sacrosanct fifth-floor galleries—the domain of van Gogh, Picasso, and Pollock—with pieces by artists from three of the seven targeted Muslim-majority nations. Each is accompanied by an extended label that reads, “This work is by an artist from a nation whose citizens are being denied entry into the United States, according to a presidential executive order issued on Jan. 27, 2017. This is one of several such artworks from the Museum’s collection installed throughout the fifth-floor galleries to affirm the ideals of welcome and freedom as vital to this Museum as they are to the United States.”

New York Museums Signal Their Resistance to Trump

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

61 days ago

4chan: The Skeleton Key to the Rise of Trump

medium.com

Andy Brett

62 days ago

I'd rather be a pirate than join any navy but boy is this a fucked up navy.

Reflecting on one very, very strange year at Uber

susanjfowler.com

Andy Brett

73 days ago

In Lewis’s account, the relationship between Kahneman and Tversky was as intense as a marriage. As anyone who has been married knows, marriages can be fraught, and they sometimes dissolve entirely, rarely amicably. Tversky and Kahneman never got divorced, but they did start dating other people, and their relationship became strained.

The Two Friends Who Changed How We Think About How We Think

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

73 days ago

People close to both men, including Mr. Thaler and Ms. Tversky, say Mr. Lewis captured the intensity of their relationship and their individual quirks. Colleagues described how the pair would finish each other’s sentences and could often be heard cackling from behind an office door as they wrote dense academic papers. Mr. Tversky was the bold one who delighted in undermining well-established dogma within psychology. Mr. Kahneman was cautious, sensitive and deeply pessimistic.

From Michael Lewis, a Portrait of the Men Who Shaped ‘Moneyball’

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

73 days ago

The result will be a more fragmented and parochial kind of capitalism, and quite possibly a less efficient one—but also, perhaps, one with wider public support. And the infatuation with global companies will come to be seen as a passing episode in business history, rather than its end.

The retreat of the global company

economist.com

Andy Brett

73 days ago

The key to understanding ghost behavior is the concept of a target tile. The large majority of the time, each ghost has a specific tile that it is trying to reach, and its behavior revolves around trying to get to that tile from its current one. All of the ghosts use identical methods to travel towards their targets, but the different ghost personalities come about due to the individual way each ghost has of selecting its target tile.

Understanding Pac-Man Ghost Behavior

gameinternals.com

Andy Brett

75 days ago

One of several memorable lines in a great profile.

He is Apollo in drag as Dionysus.

Anthony Bourdain’s Moveable Feast

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

77 days ago

Everyone on the agency team had poured their hearts into this production. No detail went unchallenged. You’d be surprised how passionately people can debate the nature and volume level of the “space hum” heard in the background.

I hand-carried the final version of HAL to our regular marketing meeting, where Steve had his first viewing. To our delight, he loved it even more than the original storyboard. Kane’s voice, Coppos’s craftsmanship and just the right touch of space hum were a perfect combination.

kensegall.com

Andy Brett

81 days ago

The only data Signal retains is the phone number you register with and when you last logged into their server.

That is it.

Even with end-to-end encryption Big Brother is still in your phone: metadata

medium.freecodecamp.com

Andy Brett

81 days ago

The number of visitors to his center and inquiries dramatically increased over the last few years, especially among those in their 20s, 30s and 40s, who now account for 70 percent of the total.

Takahashi believes the trend reflects the collapse of the permanent employment system in Japan and an increase in the number of unstable jobs as simply working at big companies does not guarantee security and satisfaction anymore.

He added that more people are also opting to lead sustainable lives especially after the March 2011 reactor meltdowns, which laid bare the negative side of convenient and modern technology.

The slow life in rural Japan is converting more young people

japantimes.co.jp

Andy Brett

83 days ago

As Mrs. Dalloway walks, she does not merely perceive the city around her. Rather, she dips in and out of her past, remolding London into a highly textured mental landscape, “making it up, building it round one, tumbling it, creating it every moment afresh.”

Why Walking Helps Us Think

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

85 days ago

At the Toronto Marathon, he raced in 15-year-old shoes and a singlet that was 20 or 30 years old. He has no coach. He follows no special diet. He does not chart his mileage. He wears no heart-rate monitor. He takes no ice baths, gets no massages. He shovels snow in the winter and gardens in the summer but lifts no weights, does no situps or push-ups. He avoids stretching, except the day of a race. He takes no medication, only a supplement that may or may not help his knees.

85-Year-Old Marathoner Is So Fast That Even Scientists Marvel

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

85 days ago

Farmers don’t need to be scurrying around trying to wring every bushel of crop from every acre. Improving the quality of life for farmers today (which includes being able to actually pay themselves a wage, which is rare on many farms this year) will be better for everyone, including for our food system in the future. Diversifying farm businesses and helping farmers create businesses that not only support their families but could potentially employ others — that’s a path to sustainable rural communities, sustainable foodsheds, and a sustainable future.

The Future of Farming is Not Farming

shift.newco.co

Andy Brett

85 days ago

The idea is to cap the size of mega-cities, but achieve the agglomeration effect with the help of bullet trains. China reckons that the resulting network of large, but not oversize, cities will be easier to manage.

China has built the world’s largest bullet-train network

economist.com

Andy Brett

92 days ago

Giant sequoias are believed to be the largest living thing on Earth by volume.

The Death of the Tunnel Tree

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

92 days ago

I get just a hint of his politics, however, when we discuss the speed and energy with which China is developing and I suggest that some might find it all a bit scary. The word sets Gates off: “If all you care about is the US or the UK’s relative strength in the world, then it’s particularly scary,” he says laughing sarcastically. “In the US case, 1945 was our relative peak.” Since then, as he points out, other countries from Europe to Asia have rebuilt and become more prosperous, but, says Gates, “I guess I’m just not enough of a nationalist to see it all in negative terms.” On the contrary, Gates is excited by the things that a richer China could bring to the world. “I think it’s good that Chinese scientists are working on cancer drugs, because if my kid got cancer, I wouldn’t look at the label that says ‘made in China’. And, hopefully, we’ll get them working on some of these vaccines and also on energy.”

Lunch with the FT: Bill Gates

medium.ft.com

Andy Brett

97 days ago

Our poll shows that the ideal family in Asia’s three largest countries (China, India and Indonesia) is now smaller than the ideal family in Britain or America.

The empty crib

economist.com

Andy Brett

105 days ago

The vast majority of Emirates’ passengers aren’t going to Dubai. Three in five fliers are connecting to somewhere else, and Dubai’s airport has been designed as a massive machine to facilitate their movements, a polished-stone fulcrum between Dar es Salaam and Guangzhou, Dallas and Dhaka. The bulk of flights arrive and depart in three “waves”: one from 2 to 4:30 a.m., another from 7 to 11 a.m., and a third from 1:30 to 4 p.m. Between those rushes the airport is eerily quiet, even in the operations center, the size of a hockey rink, where Emirates manages the flights.

Is Emirates Airline Running Out of Sky?

bloomberg.com

Andy Brett

112 days ago

The Chinook that returned this year were born in 2012, when the river “was running chocolate milk,” he said. During the demolition, few juveniles survived; there was nothing to do but wait for the water to clean itself. Two years on, the Elwha runs magnificently clear, a promising forecast for the fall runs of 2020.

New Life Along Washington State’s Elwha River

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

122 days ago

Patagonia’s Philosopher-King

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

125 days ago

At the end of the day we can sit back and admire our work – the completed article, the sealed deal, the functioning app – in the way that artisans once did, and those earning a middling wage in the sprawling service-sector no longer do.

Why do we work so hard?

1843magazine.com

Andy Brett

125 days ago

The first thing one notices about their design is that, despite its many intricacies and incidents, it is an imaginative whole. The controlling idea was that as soon as one entered the park, one was to forget the city. No elaborate formal gateways would tie the park to the surrounding city, nor would there be anything else that recalled the relentless gridded geometry of the New York street plan. Instead, the drives that led into the park curved at once to the side so that visitors quickly lost sight of the city. Even the park’s one formal feature, the quarter-mile-long mall that leads to Bethesda Terrace, was deliberately skewed at an angle so that it would not reprise the city grid.

The Genius of Winding Paths

firstthings.com

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