Andy Brett

Engineer

70 Followers | 12 Following

Follow

Andy Brett

23 days ago

No shit.

You're letting someone insert a commercial into your life anytime they want. Time to turn it off.

Turn Off Your Push Notifications. All of Them

wired.com

Andy Brett

40 days ago

The question, then, is not whether something works now but whether it could work - whether you know how to change it. Saying 'it doesn't work, today' has no value, but saying 'yes, but everything didn't work once' also has no value. Rather, do you have a roadmap? Do you know what to do next?

Not even wrong - ways to dismiss technology

ben-evans.com

Andy Brett

53 days ago

ITS rockets will launch the spaceships to Earth orbit, then come back down for a pinpoint landing about 20 minutes later. And “pinpoint” is not hyperbole: “With the addition of maneuvering thrusters, we think we can actually put the booster right back on the launch stand,” Musk wrote in his New Space paper, citing SpaceX's increasingly precise Falcon 9 first-stage landings.

Elon Musk Publishes Plans for Colonizing Mars

scientificamerican.com

Andy Brett

53 days ago

Maybe there is some market for the really fast transport of things around the world, provided we can land somewhere where noise is not a super-big deal because rockets are very noisy. We could transport cargo to anywhere on Earth in 45 minutes at the most. Hence, most places on Earth would be 20–25 minutes away. If we had a floating platform off the coast of New York, 20–30 miles out, you could go from New York to Tokyo in 25 minutes and across the Atlantic in 10 minutes. Most of your time would be spent getting to the ship, and then it would be very quick after that. Therefore, there are some intriguing possibilities there, although we are not counting on that.

An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie

online.liebertpub.com

Andy Brett

58 days ago

Jibla is certainly off the beaten track, but what's authentic here is hopelessness, hunger, and poverty.

Green Arabia

idlewords.com

Andy Brett

72 days ago

Search your feelings, Luke

And if you’re an Apple user who is being intellectually honest, you know all of this to be true.

The Falling Apple, Revisited

500ish.com

Andy Brett

78 days ago

Sounds extremely familiar...

Between January and March of 2013, the Fleet Foxes frontman, Robin Pecknold, lived alone in a small house in Port Townsend, Wash., a wind-swept town on the northeast tip of the Olympic Peninsula — a two-hour ride from Seattle by car and ferry — that empties during the dark, chilly winters. He spent his days taking a 12-week woodworking course that emphasized labor-intensive traditional craftsmanship using hand tools. Most nights, he went for long runs through the town’s hills, streets and marinas.

How the Fleet Foxes Frontman Got Out to Get Back In

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

87 days ago

It turns out that when you turn a skyscraper on its side, all of its bullying power dissipates into a humble serenity.

One More Thing

wired.com

Andy Brett

88 days ago

The trouble with the internet, Mr. Williams says, is that it rewards extremes. Say you’re driving down the road and see a car crash. Of course you look. Everyone looks. The internet interprets behavior like this to mean everyone is asking for car crashes, so it tries to supply them.

‘The Internet Is Broken’: @ev Is Trying to Salvage It

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

95 days ago

Sailors who are really good, know everything about boats, and have thousands of hours at sea are continually and unshakably terrified while on the ocean. Not because they don't know what they're doing, but because they know the ocean so well as to fear it deeply, regardless of how conditions may initially appear. Novices, on the other hand, usually proceed with an affect which is considerably more blithe. As Brian Toss once said, there are only three types of sea-faring sailors — dead, novices, and pessimists. I knew this, but not well enough.

Moxie Marlinspike >> Stories >> Hypothermia

moxie.org

Andy Brett

95 days ago

Our friends and families don’t want us to wander off in search of the expansive, euphoric revelations that Byrd experienced in his Antarctic abyss. So we keep warm, instead, within our comfortable culture of monitoring and messaging. We abhor the disconnection that the woods, the desert, the glacier threaten us with in their heartless way. Our culture leans so sharply toward the social that those who wander into the wild are lucky if they’re only considered weird.

The Benefits of Solitude

thewalrus.ca

Andy Brett

96 days ago

Silicon Valley: A Reality Check

slatestarcodex.com

Andy Brett

116 days ago

For the generation of tech companies in the 1970s and early 1980s, the essential cluster was at Xerox PARC—and its leader was Bob Taylor.

Remembering Bob Taylor, the Tech Legend Who Invented ‘Almost Everything’

wired.com

Andy Brett

118 days ago

He stayed on the air mattress. "The word I keep coming back to is 'adaptable,'" Kim says, remembering a story about Andrew's childhood. "I worked every other weekend, and my husband and his friend David would load him in the back of the car and go riding on the hunting property [in Gainesville], and Andrew would just go along with it. My sister-in-law said we weren't real parents because 
Andrew was too easy."

How Indians reliever Andrew Miller will end the tyranny of the save

espn.com

Andy Brett

118 days ago

Cities should stop trying to increase the supply of parking and rigging the market in favour of homeowners. Instead, they should raise prices until the streets and the car parks are nearly, but not quite, full—and charge everybody.

The perilous politics of parking

economist.com

Andy Brett

118 days ago

Chile's solar capacity goes to 11, in other words 🎸

Outside the plant’s operations center, a worker-safety chart rated the day’s ultraviolet radiation levels on a scale of one to 10. “Eleven,” it read. “Extreme.”

While Trump promotes coal, other countries are turning to cheap sun power

washingtonpost.com

Andy Brett

118 days ago

On the surface, it appears to be another work of guerrilla art — but it’s not.

gregfallis.com

Andy Brett

118 days ago

JPMorgan started looking into preapproving sites, a strategy known as whitelisting, this month after The New York Times showed it an ad for Chase’s private client services on a site called Hillary 4 Prison. It was under a headline claiming that the actor Elijah Wood had revealed “the horrifying truth about the Satanic liberal perverts who run Hollywood.”

Chase Had Ads on 400,000 Sites. Then on Just 5,000. Same Results.

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

118 days ago

“He seemed like he was just an easygoing coach,” Lindor says, “that was always chewing gum and making the right decisions.”

The Great Communicator

theringer.com

Andy Brett

119 days ago

I'm really glad there are people who aren't content to just run out the clock on their lives and then fade into historical oblivion, as this piece argues is the more ethical path.

Even if I had the talent to do these sorts of things (obviously I don’t), I think the wiser and more ethical path is a family, a career, a home, and then historical oblivion.

Neuralink is horrifying

tomlee.wtf

Andy Brett

119 days ago

There's no way to pick out one quote from these 38,000 words but it's a pretty mind-blowing piece. Need to read it a couple more times.

Neuralink and the Brain’s Magical Future

waitbutwhy.com

Andy Brett

121 days ago

As I thumbed toward the top of the screen, I had the disconcerting sense of watching a life become a life-style brand.

#Vanlife, the Bohemian Social-Media Movement

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

124 days ago

The Blue Corner wasn't alone. Another group started a Red Corner on the other side of the canvas. Their users claimed a leftist political leaning. Yet another started the Green Lattice, which went for a polka-dot design with interspersing green pixels and white. They championed their superior efficiency, since they only had to color half as many pixels as the other Factions.

When Pixels Collide

sudoscript.com

Andy Brett

134 days ago

Sonobe is 20 minutes from my current "home" - coincidence? Not really, I think.

Mr Miyamoto wanted you to get lost. The propulsive, unidirectional energy of “Super Mario Bros” was a holdover from the era of coin-gobbling video-game arcades. By contrast, “The Legend of Zelda” rewarded stoic perseverance, frequently leaving the player puzzling over what to do next. The aspirations of “The Legend of Zelda” had less in common with the feverish spirit of the arcades than of J.R.R. Tolkien.

The inspiration for this style of gameplay was Mr Miyamoto’s own childhood memories from the countryside of Sonobe, Japan: combing rice fields, scaling hillsides, fishing lakes. One foundational experience he had as a child was stumbling upon a cave, which he eventually mustered the courage to enter by the light of a homemade lantern “The game is not for children,” he would later say, “it is for me.” Link, like Mr Miyamoto, is left-handed.

How Nintendo told gamers to get lost

economist.com

Andy Brett

138 days ago

It is such an integral part of Japanese transportation that direction boards at the Kyoto Rail Museum even feature characters in the classic point-and-call stance.

Why Japan’s Rail Workers Can’t Stop Pointing at Things

atlasobscura.com

Andy Brett

138 days ago

One must imagine Sisyphus happy

Is it worth the trouble?

medium.com

Andy Brett

140 days ago

“See these stairs and lead up to that door?” Nohara asked me before leading me up a random flight of stairs to a mysterious door with nothing on it. “That is a restaurant.”

He then opened the door to show me a fully functional restaurant equipped with an open kitchen. There’s nothing outside the building that gives off even the slightest clue that food is served there.

Meet the Man Who Charges $780 a Day to Reveal Japan’s Hidden Secrets

nextshark.com

Andy Brett

149 days ago

How Should We Then Live?

thearchdruidreport.blogspot.com

Andy Brett

150 days ago

What I Heard From Trump Supporters

blog.samaltman.com

Andy Brett

150 days ago

"Solmorrow is a longer day", as the Book of Mormon says

Welcome To Mars! Enjoy Perpetual Jet Lag Under An Eerie Red Sky

fivethirtyeight.com

Andy Brett

152 days ago

A local eatery near me whose interior design invokes the 1930s features a bathroom with a white steel crank-roll paper towel dispenser. When spun on its ungeared mechanism, an analogous, glorious measure of towel appears directly and immediately, as if sent from heaven.

Rolling out a proper portion of towel feels remarkable largely because that victory also seems so rare, even despite constant celebrations of technological accomplishment. The frequency with which technology works precariously has been obscured by culture’s obsession with technological progress, its religious belief in computation, and its confidence in the mastery of design. In truth, hardly anything works very well anymore.

Why Nothing Works Anymore

theatlantic.com

Andy Brett

154 days ago

Stand back, however, and the implications are far more substantial than this. One can just about spot the vision of a distant, near-workless future in the habits of young gamers. If good things in life can be had for very little money, then working hard to have more than very little money looks less attractive. The history of the industrial era has been one in which technology has reduced the proportion of income devoted to necessities like food while providing vast new possibilities for consumption. As this happened, the hours worked by the typical person declined.

Escape to another world

1843magazine.com

Andy Brett

155 days ago

In the last few years, and with greater intensity in the last 12 months, people started paying for online content. They are doing so at an accelerating pace, and on a dependable, recurring schedule, often through subscriptions. And they’re paying for everything.

How the Internet Is Saving Culture, Not Killing It

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

163 days ago

This borderlessness, or, if you prefer, confusion, is also crucial to what we consider progress. As people invented new tools for new ways of living, they simultaneously created new realms of ignorance; if everyone had insisted on, say, mastering the principles of metalworking before picking up a knife, the Bronze Age wouldn’t have amounted to much. When it comes to new technologies, incomplete understanding is empowering.

Why Facts Don’t Change Our Minds

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

165 days ago

The SDF remains one of the world’s odder armies. It has never fired a shot in battle. Its main role, for many Japanese, is disaster relief. Yet it has a larger navy than France and Britain combined, including four huge “helicopter carriers”.

Japan’s government tries to free its soldiers from pacifist shackles

economist.com

Andy Brett

165 days ago

The marketing worked. In 1939, 10% of American brides received a diamond engagement ring. By the end of the century 80% did. The result was a unique industry, controlled by a single company that was both marketer and miner, a capital-intensive business built on an ephemeral link to love, its success due to strangled supply and inflated demand.

A report from De Beers’s new diamond mine

economist.com

Andy Brett

165 days ago

Foursquare likes to show off its data-crunching prowess with predictions. It forecast the sales figures for the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, for instance, and the decline in revenue, almost to the burrito bowl, for Chipotle following the E. coli mess. The company currently derives ninety per cent of its revenue from allowing a variety of businesses to use not just its A.P.I. but its data, too.

The Not-So-Surprising Survival of Foursquare

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

170 days ago

The Future of Not Working

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

170 days ago

“When I die and go to hell,” he wrote, “the devil is going to make me the marketing director for a cola company. I’ll be in charge of trying to sell a product that no one needs, is identical to its competitors and can’t be sold on its merits.”

Why Patagonia's off-the-wall advertising asks customers to think twice before buying its products

thedrum.com

Andy Brett

177 days ago

Most significant, the week after Trump signed his now unravelling travel ban, the Museum of Modern Art replaced seven works in its sacrosanct fifth-floor galleries—the domain of van Gogh, Picasso, and Pollock—with pieces by artists from three of the seven targeted Muslim-majority nations. Each is accompanied by an extended label that reads, “This work is by an artist from a nation whose citizens are being denied entry into the United States, according to a presidential executive order issued on Jan. 27, 2017. This is one of several such artworks from the Museum’s collection installed throughout the fifth-floor galleries to affirm the ideals of welcome and freedom as vital to this Museum as they are to the United States.”

New York Museums Signal Their Resistance to Trump

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

178 days ago

4chan: The Skeleton Key to the Rise of Trump

medium.com

Andy Brett

179 days ago

I'd rather be a pirate than join any navy but boy is this a fucked up navy.

Reflecting on one very, very strange year at Uber

susanjfowler.com

Andy Brett

190 days ago

In Lewis’s account, the relationship between Kahneman and Tversky was as intense as a marriage. As anyone who has been married knows, marriages can be fraught, and they sometimes dissolve entirely, rarely amicably. Tversky and Kahneman never got divorced, but they did start dating other people, and their relationship became strained.

The Two Friends Who Changed How We Think About How We Think

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

190 days ago

People close to both men, including Mr. Thaler and Ms. Tversky, say Mr. Lewis captured the intensity of their relationship and their individual quirks. Colleagues described how the pair would finish each other’s sentences and could often be heard cackling from behind an office door as they wrote dense academic papers. Mr. Tversky was the bold one who delighted in undermining well-established dogma within psychology. Mr. Kahneman was cautious, sensitive and deeply pessimistic.

From Michael Lewis, a Portrait of the Men Who Shaped ‘Moneyball’

nytimes.com

Andy Brett

190 days ago

The result will be a more fragmented and parochial kind of capitalism, and quite possibly a less efficient one—but also, perhaps, one with wider public support. And the infatuation with global companies will come to be seen as a passing episode in business history, rather than its end.

The retreat of the global company

economist.com

Andy Brett

190 days ago

The key to understanding ghost behavior is the concept of a target tile. The large majority of the time, each ghost has a specific tile that it is trying to reach, and its behavior revolves around trying to get to that tile from its current one. All of the ghosts use identical methods to travel towards their targets, but the different ghost personalities come about due to the individual way each ghost has of selecting its target tile.

Understanding Pac-Man Ghost Behavior

gameinternals.com

Andy Brett

192 days ago

One of several memorable lines in a great profile.

He is Apollo in drag as Dionysus.

Anthony Bourdain’s Moveable Feast

newyorker.com

Andy Brett

194 days ago

Everyone on the agency team had poured their hearts into this production. No detail went unchallenged. You’d be surprised how passionately people can debate the nature and volume level of the “space hum” heard in the background.

I hand-carried the final version of HAL to our regular marketing meeting, where Steve had his first viewing. To our delight, he loved it even more than the original storyboard. Kane’s voice, Coppos’s craftsmanship and just the right touch of space hum were a perfect combination.

kensegall.com

Andy Brett

198 days ago

The only data Signal retains is the phone number you register with and when you last logged into their server.

That is it.

Even with end-to-end encryption Big Brother is still in your phone: metadata

medium.freecodecamp.com

Andy Brett

198 days ago

The number of visitors to his center and inquiries dramatically increased over the last few years, especially among those in their 20s, 30s and 40s, who now account for 70 percent of the total.

Takahashi believes the trend reflects the collapse of the permanent employment system in Japan and an increase in the number of unstable jobs as simply working at big companies does not guarantee security and satisfaction anymore.

He added that more people are also opting to lead sustainable lives especially after the March 2011 reactor meltdowns, which laid bare the negative side of convenient and modern technology.

The slow life in rural Japan is converting more young people

japantimes.co.jp

Like this set of items on Pocket? Share with friends.