Aaron Slodounik

Art Historian, 19th-Century Europe. Twitter and Instagram: @aaronslodounik

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Aaron Slodounik

35 days ago

If Peterson spent more time with literary texts instead of just throwing them into facile YouTube videos, he might know they do not act as bluntly as he wishes them to act. Literary texts are disco balls, spraying glittery bits of imagery and light in all directions. Peterson’s vision cannot resonate at the level of philosophy or literary criticism, where the rules are too demanding. Where Peterson excels is at the level of carnival-barker chicanery. He’s for people who want to hear that women are bad.

Homer and Hatred: On Jordan Peterson’s Mythology

blog.lareviewofbooks.org

Aaron Slodounik

42 days ago

The new tax law, and especially the doubling of the standard deduction, may indeed decrease charitable giving as fewer taxpayers itemize than in years past, but it probably won’t do much to change the dynamics described here. Elites will continue to enjoy outsized benefits from the policy and will continue to bestow these benefits on the organizations they care about, the majority of which do comparatively little to support the poor. Meanwhile, charities’ efforts to protect the deduction have insulated it from reform—or even critique.

By giving greater relief to the highest earners, the charitable deduction disadvantages charities which protect the most vulnerable

blogs.lse.ac.uk

Aaron Slodounik

47 days ago

Instead, I came back into the room, where everyone was still silent. My students’ faces, for the most part, were turned down. I know what they had felt, black students, students of color, and white students alike. They bore witness to my vulnerability, my suffering. And they saw the impact that racism could have within an otherwise safe academic space. A few moments passed, I apologized, and resumed teaching. But the classroom was not the same. We had witnessed something together. That space will never be the same.

chronicle.com

Aaron Slodounik

48 days ago

Feminists have a habit of looking beyond whatever kind of man we might assume Baudelaire to have been, to the evidence of the texts themselves. So yes—rigorous thinkers, who by definition acknowledge the fundamental equality of the sexes, should continue to read Baudelaire because we need lucid readings of his work. Baudelaire’s verse and prose poetry remind us how powerful and political a practice reading can be.

Should feminists read Baudelaire? (2) – Baudelaire Song Project

baudelairesong.org

Aaron Slodounik

54 days ago

I make “Display It Like You Stole It” badges for people to wear on the tours. It’s a slogan designed to push museums and visitors to rethink the politics of presentation in galleries. On most text panels there’s little or no mention of how objects came to be there. Euphemistic language of “acquisition” obscures the truth. I don’t believe most visitors to the British Museum’s Benin and South Pacific collections, for example, or the V&A’s Indian collections, come away understanding that these are largely the spoils of war.

Museums are hiding their imperial pasts – which is why my tours are needed

theguardian.com

Aaron Slodounik

56 days ago

More Americans work in museums than work in coal, but coalminers are treated as sacred beings owed huge subsidies and the sacrifice of the climate, and museum workers—well, no one is talking about their jobs as a totem of our national identity.

Rebecca Solnit: Whose Story (and Country) Is This?

lithub.com

Aaron Slodounik

57 days ago

The rigors of my academic training also prepared me to run for office. Coping with my fair share of rejection letters and checked-out students made me resilient. When I answered tough policy questions at a public forum, I was calm: the forum was a breeze compared to taking my oral exam.

Outside Higher Ed: Running for Office as Alt-Ac

insidehighered.com

Aaron Slodounik

64 days ago

School-reform leaders have often obtusely dismissed the effect of poverty on students’ learning as "just an excuse." Colleges should devote more intellectual capital to informing and shaping school-reform projects, including research that reveals the real and devastating impact of poverty, violence, racism, and trauma on the ability of children to learn effectively.

Want More College Students to Graduate? Fix the High Schools

chronicle.com

Aaron Slodounik

67 days ago

Most big ideas have loud critics. Not disruption. Disruptive innovation as the explanation for how change happens has been subject to little serious criticism, partly because it’s headlong, while critical inquiry is unhurried; partly because disrupters ridicule doubters by charging them with fogyism, as if to criticize a theory of change were identical to decrying change; and partly because, in its modern usage, innovation is the idea of progress jammed into a criticism-proof jack-in-the-box.

What the gospel of innovation gets wrong.

newyorker.com

Aaron Slodounik

67 days ago

The idea of access to high-quality education through MOOCs, as she points out, is an idea of ‘academic colonialism’ (147)—the adoption of paid content provided by top-tier universities to low or mid-ranked ones. The development and maintenance of a MOOC also comes with a high price tag that is very opaque. In Head’s case, and perhaps with most other courses, more than two-thirds of the grant went to pay the technical support of Coursera, a leading platform provider. The remainder of the grant barely covered her team of nineteen graduate teaching assistants.

Book Review: Disrupt This! MOOCs and the Promise of Technology by Karen Head

blogs.lse.ac.uk

Aaron Slodounik

68 days ago

Digital shaming disallows a possibility for understanding that Jesse Stommel suggests can be achieved “by listening seriously to the voices of students and recognizing that students can be drivers of the conversation about the state of education.”

Student Shaming and the Need for Academic Empathy

hybridpedagogy.org

Aaron Slodounik

68 days ago

What this training boils down to then, is that to be successful you need to emulate the performance of ‘successful’ senior men. But surely we don’t need yet more of this in academia. Perhaps then, as feminist academics, our role is to call out individualized everyday acts of self-promotion and competition, which are so often (albeit not always) a masculine endeavour.

Working 9 to 5: Challenging the neoliberal (academic) self. By Eleanor Wilkinson

gfgrg.org

Aaron Slodounik

68 days ago

Many things that King may never have envisioned—the celebration of his birth as a national holiday, the explosive growth in black political representation, particularly the election of Barack Obama—have come to pass. But King and the authors of the Kerner Report would have recognized the ongoing concerns of poverty, the travails of American cities, and the plague of gun violence.

Honoring Martin Luther King, Jr., Fifty Years After His Death

newyorker.com

Aaron Slodounik

69 days ago

But, even as these articles display the possibilities opened up by mapping tools, data-driven methods, and digital technologies, each author is deeply aware of their limitations. As the essays in this issue demonstrate, computational approaches to the spatial humanities—which are marked by intellectual decisions, obstacles, and quandaries—must join rather than replace or supersede an existing toolkit of historically grounded methods that are based on critical analysis, close looking, and a deep skepticism about the transparent meaning of any image or map.

#5 Coordinates (Spring 2018)

journal18.org

Aaron Slodounik

69 days ago

Creating a true meritocracy in higher education would require serious, politically daring changes to our housing policies and the tax code, neither of which seems likely in the current climate. Yet people of means (and I include myself here) are complicit in a system that seems unable to stop itself from extending privileges to the privileged. If your late-model car boasts the sticker of a prestigious college in the back window, you are participating in a system that may be good for your child but bad for our country.

How to Level the College Playing Field

nytimes.com

Aaron Slodounik

70 days ago

On the other hand, creative services workers command wages 30% higher than the Australian average, with software and digital content professionals earning the highest incomes of the whole sector.

An exploding creative economy shows innovation policy shouldn’t focus only on STEM

theconversation.com

Aaron Slodounik

185 days ago

When historians illuminate the mechanics of past narratives, we open up history to new possibilities. Yet Gotlieb professes a lack of interest when it comes to laying bare ideology (43). As I write in early 2017, such a stance seems no longer tenable. No matter the political climate, disinterest is little excuse for perpetuating nationalist mythologies.

The Deaths of Henri Regnault

caareviews.org

Aaron Slodounik

306 days ago

The town’s Ku Klux Klan was founded in 1921: they put on hoods and burned crosses at midnight at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson’s sprawling plantation and the site of his grave. “Hundreds of Charlottesville’s leading business and professional men” were in attendance, the Daily Progress, which is still the city’s primary newspaper, wrote at the time. “It is said that the reorganization of the Klan is proceeding rapidly throughout the State, the South, and the Nation.” The K.K.K. made a thousand-dollar donation to the University of Virginia; the school’s president at the time, E. A. Alderman, signed his thank-you note “Faithfully yours.”

Charlottesville and the Effort to Downplay Racism in America

newyorker.com

Aaron Slodounik

308 days ago

I figured I would offer four strategies to help you build an academic routine. Three come from scholars I respect a lot and who write about academic writing. The fourth (forgive the self-citation) comes from me

Four strategies to help build an academic writing routine

raulpacheco.org

Aaron Slodounik

314 days ago

Waters’s phrase rang out as a rejection of that made manifest, delighting all of us who have been spoken over, ignored or had our time wasted by others.

In a year studded with absurd examples of men interrupting their female colleagues, a dignified woman’s firm insistence on being heard and getting straight to business was a welcome and empowering surprise

‘Reclaiming my time’ is bigger than Maxine Waters

washingtonpost.com

Aaron Slodounik

316 days ago

There’s not a single exception. All screen activities are linked to less happiness, and all nonscreen activities are linked to more happiness.

Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

theatlantic.com

Aaron Slodounik

316 days ago

What is essential to understand is that it’s not a vast crowd of black or brown people keeping white Americans out of the colleges of their choice, especially not the working-class white Americans among whom Trump finds his base of support. In fact, income tips the scale much more than race: At 38 top colleges in the United States, more students come from the top 1 percent of income earners than from the bottom 60 percent

Black people aren’t keeping white Americans out of college. Rich people are.

washingtonpost.com

Aaron Slodounik

324 days ago

Miriam Bader shared the Tenement Museum’s method of “mapping” tours. For each room of their tours, their educators wrote the “big ideas” or “essential questions” that they wanted visitors to explore. Then they noted the objects, questions, oral history, primary sources, and facts that could support those big ideas.

Preserve Rhode Island | Statewide Advocate for Historic Places

preserveri.org

Aaron Slodounik

330 days ago

Artist and data researcher Mimi Ohuoha, whose practice focuses on missing data, tells us that the very decision of what to collect or what not to collect is political. “For every dataset where there’s an impetus for someone not to collect”, she writes, “there’s a group of people who would benefit from its presence”.

You Say Data, I Say System

hackernoon.com

Aaron Slodounik

331 days ago

They recognize that the “big companies that rule the Internet aren’t coming to dominate just because of a good idea and a charismatic founder; they grow out of supportive ecosystems, including investors, lawyers, sympathetic governments, and tech schools.” With that insight, the visions of Srnicek and the platform cooperativists converge: if, for instance, governments forced megafirms like Apple and Uber to pay a fair share of taxes, they would not have such huge advantages over upstarts.

Will Amazon Take Over the World?

bostonreview.net

Aaron Slodounik

332 days ago

When you’re stuck in a creative process, unfocus may also come to the rescue when you embody and live out an entirely different personality. In 2016, educational psychologists, Denis Dumas and Kevin Dunbar found that people who try to solve creative problems are more successful if they behave like an eccentric poet than a rigid librarian. Given a test in which they have to come up with as many uses as possible for any object (e.g. a brick) those who behave like eccentric poets have superior creative performance.

Your Brain Can Only Take So Much Focus

hbr.org

Aaron Slodounik

333 days ago

The person who wins the Nobel Prize is not the person who read the most journal articles and took the most notes on them. It’s the person who knew what to look for. And cultivating that capacity to seek what’s significant, always willing to question whether you’re on the right track — that’s what education is going to be about, whether it’s using computers and the Internet, or pencil and paper, or books.”

Noam Chomsky on the Purpose of Education

brainpickings.org

Aaron Slodounik

335 days ago

The purposes of higher education then gradually changed. In the mid-19th century, American universities followed German counterparts in focusing more on research and PhDs, and launching institutions like Johns Hopkins that were purely research-focused. By the early 20th century, most Protestant universities no longer had enforced chapel or Bible study. But many still tried to form the character of their students through compulsory courses in moral education or Great Books.

What UK universities can learn from the US about promoting well-being

emotionsblog.history.qmul.ac.uk

Aaron Slodounik

337 days ago

This fear of large concentrations of wealth and power came to fruition in America’s first Gilded Age at the end of the 19th century, and it has again today. It is the present-day oligarchy that led Sitaraman back to earlier egalitarian visions in search of an alternative path. While he gives us a large sweeping historical narrative, Sitaraman speaks unabashedly to the present moment. He believes his book’s argument—that America cannot be America without a strong middle class—is essential to understanding the world we live in today

A Billionaires’ Republic

thenation.com

Aaron Slodounik

337 days ago

While this is not great news, it’s not altogether surprising. Cultural organizations have what I’ll optimistically call a “millennial opportunity.” Simply, data suggest that millennials are the most frequent visitors to cultural organizations and also – in part because this generation is so large – the generational cohort that is not visiting at representative levels. Millennials are the ones to attract and the ones to keep happy. Millennials also have the most unrealized visitation potential.

Arts & Culture Remain Less Important To Younger Generations (DATA)

colleendilen.com

Aaron Slodounik

341 days ago

It is difficult to see the political structure of data, because data maintains a veneer of scientistic objectivity. But data is inherently a form of politics, argues Jeffrey Alan Johnson. Data does not just allocate material things of value, it allocates moral values as well. Data producers encode a state of the world at a given time, which is then decoded by data users to shape social practice. As such, a political theory of data, grounded in distributive and relational information justice, is necessary.

How data does political things: The processes of encoding and decoding data are never neutral.

blogs.lse.ac.uk

Aaron Slodounik

341 days ago

Horatio Greenough’s 12-ton marble statue of George Washington heralds the newly reopened wing; originally commissioned by Congress in 1832 for the centennial of Washington’s birth, it generated criticism soon after its 1841 installation in the Capitol rotunda.

Greenough based his statue on a pose of Zeus, so the president is depicted shirtless. Washington’s nudity disturbed visitors enough to warrant several relocations

Renovated Museum Wing Delves into Untold Chapters of American History

smithsonianmag.com

Aaron Slodounik

342 days ago

At the end of this project, we have found that the academic book/monograph is still greatly valued in the academy for many reasons: the ability to produce a sustained argument within a more capacious framework than permitted by the article format; the engagement of the reader at a deep level; its central place in career progression in the arts and humanities; and its reach beyond the academy (for some titles) into bookshops and the hands of a wider public. It seems that the future is likely to be a mixed economy of print, e-versions and networked-enhanced monographs of greater or lesser complexity.

What does the future hold for academic books?

blogs.lse.ac.uk

Aaron Slodounik

346 days ago

The idea behind the conference was to consider ‘research stories’ as meaningful elements of our research, combining affective and critical histories. The inspiration lay with Antoinette Burton’s discussions of Archive Stories (Duke University Press, 2005), Arlette Farge’s reflection on the Allure of the Archives (Yale University Press, 2013), Lisa Jardine’s discussion of Temptation in the Archives (UCL Press, 2015), and Ann Laura Stoler’s call to read Along the Archival Grain (Princeton University Press, 2009).

Paper Trails: Workshop Roundup

awmsmith.wordpress.com

Aaron Slodounik

346 days ago

Yet according to Henry Urbach, the closet as a “new spatial type,” a wall cavity adjacent to a proper room, did not emerge until around 1840 in the United States. The newly subservient closet obscured itself by receding into the wall, and it attempted to “disappear” the family’s stuff. Now householders could relish in consumption and enjoy their material possessions, while also moderating the objects’ display and maintaining a semblance of frugality and moral propriety. The “non-room” closet housed things (and gluttonous vices) “that threaten[ed] to soil the room” (and the family’s reputation).

Closet Archive

placesjournal.org

Aaron Slodounik

347 days ago

In the work of his disciple—and focus of my research—the painter Paul Gauguin, when we shine an x-ray onto his seemingly spontaneous canvases, we see evidence of the handiwork beneath the surface that is in fact carefully pre-planned.

We needn’t possess x-ray vision to expose Trump’s anti-civil-rights campaign. We’ll simply treat Trump’s written and verbal texts as a dataset.

How Big Data can expose a nascent White (House) Nationalism

blogs.lse.ac.uk

Aaron Slodounik

347 days ago

By the 1890s, most men were wearing either neckties or bow ties. For day wear, these ties could be solid or patterned. For evening wear, they were white.

A Century of Sartorial Style: A Visual Guide to 19th Century Menswear

mimimatthews.com

Aaron Slodounik

347 days ago

Even more remarkable was that some viewers would turn to their families and friends and actually pose alongside or in front of the paintings, imitating the figures themselves.[7] Although clearly intended for comedic purposes, this form of self-identification with these “Victorians in togas” made me realize that the audiences in fact did not see them as “Victorians” at all, but rather as themselves in costumed attire.

Ferrari reviews Alma-Tadema, klassieke verleiding (Alma-Tadema : At Home in Antiquity)

19thc-artworldwide.org

Aaron Slodounik

347 days ago

Here there is no passivity. Barron is the actor. He is in motion, walking, swinging, looking. He faces none of the restrictions that Melania places on herself. He stands behind no one, no barrier, no glass. Photographically, she composes a world for him that is much bigger than her own.

Fairytale Prisoner by Choice: The Photographic Eye of Melania Trump

medium.com

Aaron Slodounik

347 days ago

The London of the 1790s–the apex of the Enlightenment–is a history that is both far and near to 2017 America as it provides an analogue for resisting our own impending catastrophe. Inspired by new models of life developed in the biological sciences, 18th century Romantic artists like William Blake explored an alternative to the mechanistic, divisive Enlightenment principles that drove the oppressive legislation during the 1790s.

The Science of Life as Art and Dissent

thenewinquiry.com

Aaron Slodounik

347 days ago

This is not the first ‘big data’ era but the second. The first was the explosion in data collection that occurred from the early 19th century – Hacking’s ‘avalanche of numbers’, precisely situated between 1820 and 1840. This was an analogue big data era, different to our current digital one but characterized by some very similar problems and concerns.

Big data problems we face today can be traced to the social ordering practices of the 19th century.

blogs.lse.ac.uk

Aaron Slodounik

348 days ago

The paper assigned him to cover England, and for a decade, he published story after story “from” London, spellbinding his readers with “personal” accounts of dramatic events, like the devastating Tooley Street Fire of 1861.

But during the entire decade, he never actually crossed the English Channel.

The stunning thing — and the part that resonates today — is how Fontane pulled it off.

How the techniques of 19th-century fake news tell us why we fall for it today

niemanlab.org

Aaron Slodounik

350 days ago

Because modern antisemitic ideology traffics in fantasies of invisible power, it thrives precisely when its target would seem to be least vulnerable. Thus, in places where Jews were most assimilated—France at the time of the Dreyfus affair, Germany before Hitler came to power—they have functioned as a magic bullet to account for unaccountable contradictions at moments of national crisis.

Skin in the Game: How Antisemitism Animates White Nationalism

politicalresearch.org

Aaron Slodounik

354 days ago

Evidence, as the title suggests, concerns itself with just one segment of the social research process: the hazardous business of turning observations of the world into claims about the world. The book’s position is that the responsible use of evidence is a permanent problem for social science, one that demands the constant attention of researchers; the end of developing good evidence can never be achieved purely by procedural or technical means, but requires that we “use the deficiencies in our own way of working as sources of ideas about how to improve.”

Learning from Mistakes: Howard S. Becker’s “Evidence”

lareviewofbooks.org

Aaron Slodounik

354 days ago

But Hoffman said the team also relied on the principle of harm articulated by John Stuart Mill, a 19th-century English political philosopher. It states “that the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.”

Facebook’s Secret Censorship Rules Protect White Men From Hate Speech But Not Black Children

propublica.org

Aaron Slodounik

356 days ago

What can an art of words take from the art that needs none? Yet I often think I’ve learned as much from watching dancers as I have from reading. Dance lessons for writers: lessons of position, attitude, rhythm and style, some of them obvious, some indirect. What follows are a few notes towards that idea.

Zadie Smith: dance lessons for writers

theguardian.com

Aaron Slodounik

357 days ago

Feminist pedagogy teaches that silence is not an absence, but the effect of power. It encourages us to listen to those voices that have historically been silenced and to change the structural conditions so that their voices are heard. Equitable timekeeping is one way to achieve this. 

Timekeeping as feminist pedagogy

hastac.org

Aaron Slodounik

357 days ago

TMC: The best thing I have done for my practice is to develop one. It doesn't always feel like it but having a writing practice is an act of self-care if only because it moves a project along. And few things are as deeply satisfying as making writing progress.

Writing A Book In And Of Real Life: An interview with Tressie McMillan Cottom

hastac.org

Aaron Slodounik

357 days ago

A recent Pew Research Center survey of 1,408 technology and education professionals suggested that the most valuable skills in the future will be those that machines can’t yet easily replicate, like creativity, critical thinking, emotional intelligence, adaptability and collaboration. In short, people need to learn how to learn, because the only hedge against a fast-changing world is the ability to think, adapt and collaborate well.

The most forward-thinking, future-proof college in America teaches every student the exact same stuff

qz.com

Aaron Slodounik

357 days ago

Then there are other moments when I think folks thought intersectionality was just about who is standing up there. Not necessarily what they're saying. You can be a woman of color or you can be a queer woman and not necessarily have an intersectional analysis.... You can be a white woman or a man of color and have an intersectional analysis. It's one of the reasons why I stay away from the idea that you can tell if a movement or an organization is intersectional just based on who's leading it. That's not always the case.

No Single-Issue Politics, Only Intersectionality: An Interview With Kimberlé Crenshaw

truth-out.org

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