Tim F

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Tim F

16 days ago

Why Lebanon’s prime minister resigned

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

117 days ago

Maybe we’ve been imagining this scenario incorrectly all of this time. Maybe this is what “computers out of control” really look like. There’s no giant spaceship, nor are there armies of lifelike robots. Instead, we have created a swamp of unreality, a world where you don’t know whether the emotions you are feeling are manipulated by men or machines

Maybe the A.I. dystopia is already here

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

120 days ago

Nine Questions about the Trans Sahara Counter Terrorism Partnership You Were Too Embarrassed to Ask

warontherocks.com

Tim F

120 days ago

What Harvard Business School Has Learned About Online Collaboration From HBX

hbr.org

Tim F

120 days ago

In short, Russia wants to be, and be seen as, a great power. It wants to lead the nations that resist Western power and influence. In defying the U.N. and supporting North Korea, Russia bolsters that status at home and abroad.

Why is Putin backing North Korea? To build up Russia as a great power.

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

125 days ago

It is natural for people to benchmark their sense of the world by their personal experience of it, so as America becomes more socioeconomically separated, people will have an increasingly skewed view of America’s actual diversity and their place in it.

$330,000 in financial aid bought me a slot in the American meritocracy. Now I see its flaws.

vox.com

Tim F

132 days ago

Cyberwarfare has taken a new turn. Yes, it’s time to worry.

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

188 days ago

An interesting article about science and public perception. What drives research? How important is it to move toward public interest and to address the popular myths that feed on public distrust of the medical community?

“I believe we need to research and study rigorously the things that patients are interested in,” said Lebwohl. “This is, in my view, a necessary part of science’s mission—to go to where the public is interested and provide sound analysis. If the public is barking up the wrong tree, we shouldn’t ignore that.”

Science Has Begun Taking Gluten Seriously

theatlantic.com

Tim F

220 days ago

I'm not sure how you add lasting resilience to a nationwide electrical grid without hitting stage 3. I expect there will be increased vulnerability to attack during the latter portions of stage 1 and much of stage 2. Large public utilities that are reliant on intermittent energy sources and the technology to shift and adapt to their fluctuations are more vulnerable and attacks can have greater consequences. Once you decentralize, that vulnerability fades (both the opportunity and the damage that can be inflicted).

The 3 Stages of a Country Embracing Renewable Energy

hbr.org

Tim F

229 days ago

Is 100% renewable energy realistic? Here’s what we know.

vox.com

Tim F

229 days ago

A long, detailed look at Xi Jinping and his philosophy. Something that I think often gets lost in external views of China and it's leaders' perspectives is how thoroughly they are necessarily shaped by the Cultural Revolution. How can something to do completely reshaped your life not leave an indelible impression that affects your major decisions later in life? I'd argue that the Revolution and the collapse of the Soviet Union are two huge drivers behind Xi's ruling philosophy.

Xi and the sons of other targeted officials stayed together, getting into street fights and swiping books from shuttered libraries. Later, Xi described that period as a dystopian collapse of control. He was detained “three or four times” by groups of Red Guards, and forced to denounce his father.

Born Red

newyorker.com

Tim F

229 days ago

An interesting perspective on WW1 and what the results might have looked like had we not intervened. Looking beyond WW1, though, I thought this quote was particularly interesting in light of current events. Although the author mentions Iran, the same calculus exists for Syria, Russia, and China.

America has acted as it has over the past century not because it is so good or so bad, but because it is so rich, so visible, and so strong. America’s strength sways world politics even when it is not exerted: Any aggressive illiberal power must fear the United States as the ultimate potential check on its aspirations. So it was with Germany in 1917. So it is with Iran today.

What If the Allies Had Lost World War I?

theatlantic.com

Tim F

229 days ago

A great article overall (discussing how a first step can lead to substantial mission creep) but this quote struck me as particularly important. It's all or nothing for Assad. He's not engaged in heated debates about 59 or 60 cruise missiles, he's not concerned with collateral damage, and he's not concerned about escalation. Too late for all of that. It's about regime survival and taking any and all steps to ensure it.

Assad is engaged in an existential fight. His country is in ruins. Half the population is displaced. He’s not going to bend to America’s will because of a few craters on an airfield.

The Logic of Mission Creep

theatlantic.com

Tim F

229 days ago

Born Red

newyorker.com

Tim F

230 days ago

What Is Bashar al-Assad Thinking?

nytimes.com

Tim F

234 days ago

How Does Populism Turn Authoritarian? Venezuela Is a Case in Point

nytimes.com

Tim F

254 days ago

Why Employees At Apple And Google Are More Productive

fastcompany.com

Tim F

254 days ago

Great article. Perhaps private equity firms are the new robber barons... Without the benefit of leaving a bunch of tracks and infrastructure in their destructive wake.

The Ghost Bosses

theatlantic.com

Tim F

254 days ago

In the Future, We’ll All Wear Spider Silk

newyorker.com

Tim F

333 days ago

World War Three, by Mistake

newyorker.com

Tim F

475 days ago

A good read.

The Original Underclass

theatlantic.com

Tim F

480 days ago

Excerpt:

Republicans can have a get-tough policy with Russia (and defend U.S. and European democracies), or they can tout Trump, but they should be honest: These two things are contradictory.

Russian hacking: What we know and Trump doesn’t

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

493 days ago

Donald Trump’s Ghostwriter Tells All

newyorker.com

Tim F

503 days ago

Perhaps this will change with time (certainly a risk to monitor) but it appears that Chinese companies' disruptions mostly affect the efforts of Western companies to penetrate and achieve long term success within the Chinese market.

This is still a bigger issue than it first appears since companies that need to continue to grow often need to register success in new markets and China is the biggest outside of the West. Plus, at a certain point, the citizens of emerging countries may begin looking to Chinese products and services as their aspirational purchases rather than similar offerings from US companies.

How Chinese Companies Disrupt Through Business Model Innovation

hbr.org

Tim F

503 days ago

Opening story…

apple.news

Tim F

503 days ago

An interesting editorial on how instantaneous knowledge (from all angles - and almost always filled with incorrect assumptions and narratives about ongoing events) changes our overall perspective on both an individual event and its larger meaning. The most breathtaking anecdotal events (no matter how unusual their occurrence may actually be) get the most attention and set the tone of national conversation. And the initial errors in breathless reporting are often those that resonate the longest with the viewing public.

I feel sympathy for the news organizations that must somehow adapt to this environment and provide useful content - both during an event and in its aftermath.

Excerpt:

WTF leaves us hyperinformed and exhausted with despair. People in 1968 had the luxury of waiting on a tarmac for RFK to arrive one April evening and, when he did, he informed them — the entire crowd — of MLK’s shooting in the evening. Imagine an entire crowd of people not knowing something the second it happened.

Welcome to a world of chaos and collapse, brought to you by ‘WTF?’

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

522 days ago

Venezuelans Ransack Stores as Hunger Grips the Nation

nytimes.com

Tim F

522 days ago

A great read.

The Cultural Roots of Crime

theatlantic.com

Tim F

523 days ago

Not seeing it. Video is harder to consume anywhere, less easy to share in snippets, and less information-dense (so it can actually take longer to fully deliver information than the written word). But maybe I've just become old fashioned.

Facebook is predicting the end of the written word

qz.com

Tim F

529 days ago

The masterful businessman:

The company lost money every year of Trump’s leadership, and its share price suffered. A shareholder who bought $100 of DJT shares in 1995 could sell them for about $4 in 2005. The same investment in MGM Resorts would have increased in value to about $600.

As its stock collapsed, Trump’s firm gave him huge bonuses and paid for his jet

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

531 days ago

China says its propaganda just isn’t strong enough

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

537 days ago

Transcript of "A new way to stop identity theft"

ted.com

Tim F

537 days ago

An Infantry Squad for the 21st Century

warontherocks.com

Tim F

537 days ago

Excerpt:

Once you’ve convinced yourself that a president of the other party is the very worst possible thing that could befall America, then any nominee of your party—literally no matter who—becomes a lesser evil. And with that, the last of the guardrails is smashed.

The Seven Broken Guardrails of Democracy

theatlantic.com

Tim F

537 days ago

Interesting perspective. Highlights both the grandiose vision of Chinese leaders (that may yet bankrupt them more than leading to Chinese leadership) and the danger of Trump's inward focus and the associated abandonment of the US approach to world leadership.

President Trump would hand the world to China

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

537 days ago

Wayne Barrett covered Donald Trump for 40 years. Here's what he's learned.

cdn.ampproject.org

Tim F

537 days ago

Excerpt:

"Hard working is what gets the job done,” Dweck said. “The students who thrive are not necessarily the ones who come in with the perfect scores. It’s the ones who love what they’re doing and go at it vigorously.”

The myth of the well-rounded student? It’s better to be ‘T-shaped’.

washingtonpost.com

Tim F

537 days ago

Practice Makes Possible: What We Learn By Studying Amazing Kids

npr.org

Tim F

537 days ago

Iraqi Army Seen as Ill Equipped to Retake Mosul From ISIS, Despite U.S. Aid

mobile.nytimes.com

Tim F

537 days ago

Syria civil war: The message from Moscow

aljazeera.com

Tim F

538 days ago

Why the World Is Drawing Battle Lines Against American Tech Giants

mobile.nytimes.com

Tim F

538 days ago

Interesting stuff!

Why Chicago Is Becoming The Country’s Urban Farming Capital

fastcoexist.com

Tim F

538 days ago

How China Fell Off the Miracle Path

mobile.nytimes.com

Tim F

547 days ago

Excerpt:

"It all comes down to a simple point. You may not like Gawker. They've published stories I would have been ashamed to publish. But if the extremely wealthy, under a veil secrecy, can destroy publications they want to silence, that's a far bigger threat to freedom of the press than most of the things we commonly worry about on that front. If this is the new weapon in the arsenal of the super rich, few publications will have the resources or the death wish to scrutinize them closely."

A Huge, Huge Deal

talkingpointsmemo.com

Tim F

558 days ago

Interesting to see the pace at which this is moving. To a degree, it demonstrates Musk's influence on the tech entrepreneur community as much as anything else.

The Age of the Hyperloop Has Arrived. Well, for the Most Part

wired.com

Tim F

562 days ago

After all the articles and studies I've seen lately hammering on the idea of weight loss (exercise doesn't work! Diet doesn't work! Look what happened to the Biggest Losers after the show!) I find this one to be refreshing.

Excerpt:

The truth is there will come a point where you can't happily live any better — where you can't happily eat less and you can't happily exercise more — and your weight, living with that life, is your best weight. In every other area of our lives we readily accept our best efforts as great, and we need to do that with weight and healthful living too.

I'm an obesity doctor. I've seen long-term weight loss work. Here's how.

vox.com

Tim F

577 days ago

Great read on some different approaches to dealing with drugs in America. I'd argue the collateral damage inflicted upon trafficking and transit states is more damaging than this article really addresses. Although parts of Latin America have struggled with limited rule of law for years, the drug war and the aggressive, well-funded criminal organizations it has bred create conditions where rule of law cannot succeed.

America can end its war on drugs. Here's how.

vox.com

Tim F

584 days ago

Disturbing. The movement to install a non-democratically elected leader so flagrantly misunderstands history they are unintentionally begging for a model like China...or Iran and its Supreme Leader, accountable only to the Assembly of Experts (and Allah).

And these same fools think that would reinforce, not weaken, the rule of law. Because not being truly accountable to the citizens whose lives your decisions impact is ALWAYS the best way to reinforce rule of law, right?

The alt-right is more than warmed-over white supremacy. It’s that, but way way weirder.

vox.com

Tim F

584 days ago

Long, interesting read. Another one of those articles that better frames the frustrations of Americans that have created opportunities for the populist approaches of Trump and Sanders.

Of note: little of what Trump offers as solutions (if you want to call what he pitches a "solution") would actually address the problems highlighted by this article.

How America’s Coastal Cities Left the Heartland Behind

theatlantic.com

Tim F

585 days ago

So that's the problem with newspaper articles. Was Mr. Jackson suppressing laughter when he said this? Sweating bullets? Drunk...? All we see are the words. No way to know if he has a dry wit, a calm demeanor when facing chaos, or he's just a plain old good liar.

Excerpt:

“We are excited and we anticipate a great convention,” said Daniel Williams, a spokesman for Cleveland Mayor Frank G. Jackson (D).

While the GOP worries about convention chaos, Trump pushes for ‘showbiz’ feel

washingtonpost.com

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