Stuart Morris

Automation Technician. Tech nerd who craves the outdoors, devours indie music, gigs, and audiobooks. https://www.stuartmorris.me/

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Stuart Morris

413 days ago

The Couple's Guide to Thru-Hiking (and Not Going Crazy)

outsideonline.com

Stuart Morris

431 days ago

The dilemma of ethical consumption: how much are your ethics worth to you?

theguardian.com

Stuart Morris

441 days ago

As the fires rage on, bringing little but anti-green and pro-coal propaganda from our governments, we have a choice. We can go on pretending that exploitation is a sustainable way of life. We can pursue this culture of denial, where truths about nature, climate, women and Indigenous peoples are held in contempt. Or we can dust off our angel wings and smarten up.

Survival-by-respect or death-by-stupid: your choice, Straya

smh.com.au

Stuart Morris

446 days ago

The internet has been colonized by a handful of big tech companies that wield their monopoly power without restraint. This power allow them to bully, extort, or, should they please, even destroy our business – unless we accept their often onerous, exploitive, and ever-changing terms and condi

Testimony before the House Antitrust Subcommittee

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

851 days ago

“Medecin Sans Frontiers report that the despair on Nauru is worse than they have seen with victims of torture. (Hopelessness, homelessness, lack of purpose and future is torture.) Children and some adults are suffering the potentially fatal resignation syndrome. Twelve men have died on Manus. Yet medical transfers are fiercely resisted by Home Affairs and Peter Dutton, the minister who suggested that “a single act of compassion” could allure people smugglers.”

Medecin Sans Frontiers report that the despair on Nauru is worse than they have seen with victims of torture. (Hopelessness, homelessness, lack of purpose and future is torture.) Children and some adults are suffering the potentially fatal resignation syndrome. Twelve men have died on Manus. Yet medical transfers are fiercely resisted by Home Affairs and Peter Dutton, the minister who suggested that “a single act of compassion” could allure people smugglers.

Two vital principles of democracy jettisoned amid ugly games

smh.com.au

Stuart Morris

866 days ago

long.fm

Stuart Morris

866 days ago

Zuckerberg's control of Facebook is near absolute – who will hold him accountable?

theguardian.com

Stuart Morris

866 days ago

“Abolition pushes us to envision ways of addressing violence and creating safer communities without using forms of harm to do so. In her keynote, Angela Davis said it takes courage to imagine this different future as we inevitably feel most comfortable in what we know. To build a world without prisons is to disrupt a society built on inequity, patriarchal violence and colonisation.”

Abolition pushes us to envision ways of addressing violence and creating safer communities without using forms of harm to do so. In her keynote, Angela Davis said it takes courage to imagine this different future as we inevitably feel most comfortable in what we know. To build a world without prisons is to disrupt a society built on inequity, patriarchal violence and colonisation.

We need to abolish prisons to disrupt a society built on inequality

theguardian.com

Stuart Morris

872 days ago

Inside the Pricey War to Influence Your Instagram Feed

wired.com

Stuart Morris

874 days ago

When passwords get stolen, this Australian guy alerts the world

fastcompany.com

Stuart Morris

888 days ago

I Thought the Web Would Stop Hate, Not Spread It

nytimes.com

Stuart Morris

945 days ago

“Because in the end, the threat to our democracy doesn’t just come from Donald Trump or the current batch of Republicans in Congress or the Koch brothers and their lobbyists, or too much compromise from Democrats, or Russian hacking,” he said. “The biggest threat to our democracy is indifference.”

Obama Lashes Trump in Debut 2018 Speech. President’s Response: ‘I Fell Asleep.’

nytimes.com

Stuart Morris

1013 days ago

Leave No Trace Says Stop Geotagging, for Pete’s Sake

adventure-journal.com

Stuart Morris

1031 days ago

Reflecting on five years at Basecamp

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

1033 days ago

Anthony Bourdain and the Power of Telling the Truth

newyorker.com

Stuart Morris

1034 days ago

Don’t Eat Before Reading This

newyorker.com

Stuart Morris

1072 days ago

The Case Against Google

nytimes.com

Stuart Morris

1072 days ago

A Most American Terrorist: The Making of Dylann Roof

gq.com

Stuart Morris

1073 days ago

Nuzzel Not Found

nzzl.us

Stuart Morris

1077 days ago

Patagonia vs. Donald Trump

gq.com

Stuart Morris

1087 days ago

The Law Is Coming, Mr. Trump

nytimes.com

Stuart Morris

1098 days ago

Tap. Scroll. Swipe. Zone out. Time passes.

All the formerly unoccupied in-between time is now is booked by our phones. We like to think we’re being efficient and getting stuff done, but in fact, we’re denying our brains something critical — boredom.

Manoush Zomorodi says it’s time to get bored

blog.mozilla.org

Stuart Morris

1103 days ago

A wonderful summary of the intention of the second amendment.

The Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution doesn’t just say Congress shall not infringe the right to “keep and bear arms.” It specifically says that right exists in order to maintain “a well-regulated militia.” Even the late conservative Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia admitted those words weren’t in there by accident. Oh, and the Constitution doesn’t just say a “militia.” It says a “well-regulated” militia.

What did the Founding Fathers mean by that? We don’t have to guess because they told us. In Federalist No. 29 of the Federalist Papers, Alexander Hamilton explained at great length precisely what a “well-regulated militia” was, why the Founding Fathers thought we needed one, and why they wanted to protect it from being disarmed by the federal government.

The Second Amendment is an instrument of government. It’s not about hunting or gun collecting or carrying your pistol into the saloon.

Opinion: What America’s gun fanatics won’t tell you

marketwatch.com

Stuart Morris

1111 days ago

All of us have had our personal data breached by countless organisations. It is well past time for a Digital Protection Agency who has the mandate, and the power, to enforce these companies to properly handle our personal information, force them to fix up their fuckups, and help citizens restore their identities when they're stolen.

Silicon Valley Has Failed to Protect Our Data. Here’s How to Fix It

bloomberg.com

Stuart Morris

1127 days ago

You’re not changing the world

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

1142 days ago

The Solo: A Star Wars Story Trailer Re-Cut to the Beastie Boys Has No Right to Be This Great

io9.gizmodo.com

Stuart Morris

1152 days ago

Cultivating an Inclusive Culture

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

1161 days ago

"Tonight (it never gets dark this time of year) I skied back to the Pole again... to take this photo for all those men who commented “Make me a sandwich” on my TEDX Talk. I made you a sandwich (ham & cheese), now ski 37 days and 600km to the South Pole and you can eat it."

Polar explorer Jade Hameister explains why she served trolls a sandwich during South Pole trek

abc.net.au

Stuart Morris

1161 days ago

Moonlighting managers ain’t got no time for bullshit

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

1164 days ago

Out of the 60, 70, 80 hours a week many are expected to pour into work, how many of those hours are really spent on the work itself? And how many are tossed away in meetings, lost to distraction, and withered away by inefficient business practices? The bulk.

The answer isn’t more hours, it’s less bullshit. Less waste, not more production. And far fewer things that induce distraction, always-on anxiety, and stress.

The Calm Company (our next book)

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

1168 days ago

What you are about to read is a detailed, intimate, behind-the-scenes, never-EVER-before mentioned, and often soul crushing breakdown of what has been going on with me musically since my last release. I also will explain how I intend to create and release music going forward, and how I hope you will play a part.

My Music Credo 2018

mynameischance.com

Stuart Morris

1173 days ago

Three’s company

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

1173 days ago

The Family That Built an Empire of Pain

newyorker.com

Stuart Morris

1174 days ago

Science Fiction

sympatico.ca

Stuart Morris

1177 days ago

One script to rule them all, One script to find them, One script to bring them all and in the darkness bind them.

Bonfire of the academies: Two professors on how leftist intolerance is killing higher education

washingtonexaminer.com

Stuart Morris

1179 days ago

Given how involved Musk is in the engineering side of things, a question that he commonly gets asked is how on Earth he learned so much about rockets. His answer? “I read a lot of books.”

It’s an answer that almost makes you want to laugh. Picking up rocket science as a hobby through reading isn’t what normal people do. Yet, it’s not completely unbelievable. We’ve all heard the stories about how many of the people we admire attribute much of their success to their thirst for knowledge and their love of books.

You are what you read

qz.com

Stuart Morris

1245 days ago

There’s a certain peacefulness that comes with having less “stuff”, much of which we likely don’t know we even have or rarely use.

32 photos that show how obsessed Japan is with minimalism

independent.co.uk

Stuart Morris

1260 days ago

September 29, 1982, seemed like a day that would live in corporate-America infamy after three Chicagoans died from taking cyanide-laced capsules of extra-strength Tylenol. In the coming days, four others would die from ingesting a corrupted version of the painkiller, which had been laced with cyanide. Johnson & Johnson, the maker of Tylenol, would subsequently be thrust into one of the biggest nightmares in its history.

This Could Be the End of Facebook

vanityfair.com

Stuart Morris

1316 days ago

“I’ve spent tens of thousands of dollars on training programs and all sorts of employee engagement initiatives… and office chairs was the thing that did it?!”

Knock out a quick win

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

1318 days ago

getpocket.com

Stuart Morris

1321 days ago

Close the loop

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

1323 days ago

Attempt to Read a Book Every Week (It’s a Lot Easier Than You Think)

medium.com

Stuart Morris

1323 days ago

She retired at 28 with $2.25 million

money.cnn.com

Stuart Morris

1325 days ago

How This Remarkable Couple Bootstrapped Their Startup To Millions In Under 3 Years

forbes.com

Stuart Morris

1326 days ago

Recognize the messenger

m.signalvnoise.com

Stuart Morris

1326 days ago

Stop Consuming. Start Creating.

medium.com

Stuart Morris

1340 days ago

medium.com

Stuart Morris

1372 days ago

The Narrative Fallacy

ryanholiday.net

Stuart Morris

1384 days ago

The democratization of taste, abetted by the Web, coincides with the democratization of creativity. The makers have the means to sell, but everybody has the means to make. And everybody’s using them. Everybody seems to fancy himself a writer, a musician, a visual artist. Apple figured this out a long time ago: that the best way to sell us its expensive tools is to convince us that we all have something unique and urgent to express.

“Producerism,” we can call this, by analogy with consumerism. What we’re now persuaded to consume, most conspicuously, are the means to create. And the democratization of taste ensures that no one has the right (or inclination) to tell us when our work is bad. A universal grade inflation now obtains: we’re all swapping A-minuses all the time, or, in the language of Facebook, “likes.”

The Death of the Artist—and the Birth of the Creative Entrepreneur

theatlantic.com

Stuart Morris

1391 days ago

It's legal in every US state for underage girls to be married off, often at the behest of families and judges, and often to hide the offence of paedophiles in their own community. These girls can't get a job, a license, sign a lease, or get a loan, so why can they be married? A number of states don't even specify a minimum age. The State Department has called out other countries for this barbaric practice, yet politicians remain unconvinced of the need for change—apparently more concerned about births out of wedlock than stamping out domestic violence and rape committed against their children.

11 Years Old, a Mom, and Pushed to Marry Her Rapist in Florida

nytimes.com

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